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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Could anyone tell me some info on a Young Repeating Arms Co. Trap gun. I’m needing to know the chamber on the gun ? I’m planning on taking it to a gunsmith but was wondering if anyone had ever fired one of these and if 2 3/4” high brass shells could be shot in it? No markings on the barrel at all. I’m hoping to take it out and hopefully shoot me a gobbler with it . Any help would be appreciated .
 

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It will be ill advised to feed your 120+ year old gun anything but light target loads. I would consider shooting turkey loads through your gun tantamount to abuse. Looking at photos it does not appear to be a particularly robust gun, and even the most sturdy shotgun of that time period wasn't built for anywhere near what a standard turkey load is today.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It will be ill advised to feed your 120+ year old gun anything but light target loads. I would consider shooting turkey loads through your gun tantamount to abuse. Looking at photos it does not appear to be a particularly robust gun, and even the most sturdy shotgun of that time period wasn't built for anywhere near what a standard turkey load is today.
Thanks for the info . I pulled up a video on internet and looks like their gun was shooting high brass but I’m not sure of that . Anyway I was leaning towards your thoughts myself .
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·



View attachment 1741325
I found that and I also found this .



View attachment 1741325
 

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I found that and I also found this .
"high brass" doesn't necessarily mean "high power" or "high velocity" or heavy shot charge. Some of the highest brass shotshells ever produced were standard target loads.
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Sorry I am new to this forum and can’t get a picture to post. I did find an article from Auction ZIP that states 3” chamber on the one for auction. This was in 2018 and the gun brought good money in that auction. This is the only listing with a stated chamber . I am going to take mine to a gunsmith before I try to fire any kind .
 

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There is one of these guns in the ATA Hall of Fame museum at Sparta. Two years ago there was no documentation with the gun other than the manufacturer. I asked them how it worked so the director and I took it out of the showcase and figured out how what the buttons did that allowed it to open up and operate. If works basically like a normal pump except you push it forward and then pull back to load another round. It is a museum piece, and not something that should be shot with modern shells.
 

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I doubt many 3" shells existed when this gun was made. Regardless, 3" shells from 120 years ago would be extremely different than 3" shells today. I'll bet a 3" load of that era wouldn't be terribly different than a heavy target load today, except for the difference in shot size.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I doubt many 3" shells existed when this gun was made. Regardless, 3" shells from 120 years ago would be extremely different than 3" shells today. I'll bet a 3" load of that era wouldn't be terribly different than a heavy target load today, except for the difference in shot size.
You are probably correct. I wonder if they were shooting black powder shells in them back then?
 

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First of all why would you want to ruin an antique gun. If you have had it this long it must have some intrinsic value to you or your immediate family. This would be akin to taking an old Parker side by side and removing all of the case colors to make it shiny. If all you want to do is take a shot at a turkey go find an H&R Topper and have at it. Leave the firearm relics to those in the future who come after you.
 

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I caught a lot of hell when I took my vintage 37 Chev, which was original and running with only79,000 miles on it. I scraped all the running gear and made a hotrod out of it. I took a lot of grief, but I plan on being here only one lifetime and I am going to live it and enjoy it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
To everyone that has answered my question I thank you . I am not out to beat up the gun and especially even think about destroying it . I just received it Saturday from a purchase. I can understand the not shooting a new load in it . Anyway no use to get all upset about it because if I do go shoot a turkey with it then I’ll use a load that is safe for the gun . I just personally think it would be neat to harvest a bird with an old gun like this . Who knows I might just put it in one of my safes like I have some of my others and never pull the trigger on it . I was just trying to get some info on a safe shell to shoot if I even decide to shoot it. I am not familiar with the RST loads but I will research and find out some info on them (I promise ).
 

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American Small Arms, 1904, “Young Repeating Shotgun” states the gun was designed to shoot 2 5/8" - 3" shells
American Small Arms

American Rifleman, Sept. 1966, “The Young Repeating Shotgun” by Donald A. Hutslar
You could request the full article from your local library.

1741444
 

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At the 1901 GAH at Live Birds, "Sparrow" Young used his Repeating Shotgun killing 23 birds. He used Hazard Bulk Smokeless 3 1/2 Dr.Eq. with 1 1/4 oz. shot
The pressure of that load equaled or exceeded those of today's trap loads.

That said, who is the gunsmith that will be evaluating the gun, with the experience and expertise to do so? And can he fabricate the parts when something breaks?
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
At the 1901 GAH at Live Birds, "Sparrow" Young used his Repeating Shotgun killing 23 birds. He used Hazard Bulk Smokeless 3 1/2 Dr.Eq. with 1 1/4 oz. shot
The pressure of that load equaled or exceeded those of today's trap loads.

That said, who is the gunsmith that will be evaluating the gun, with the experience and expertise to do so? And can he fabricate the parts when something breaks?
Thank you sir more and likely won’t be shooting it at all . That’s why I got on here and posted to get some info . Just because I had a wild hair to try and kill a turkey sometimes it isn’t worth it in the end. I have a local gunsmith that has been working on guns for many years but still as most everyone has stated the loads of today are much stronger and could damage my gun. No going to take that chance. I had found some info but had no idea that those type loads were to be shot in it . I figured back in those years they didn’t even have that great a shell . Everyone just imagine going 100 of 100 with those shells they were shooting. When you think of it that was quite a feat .
 

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I have been doing research on the Young trap gun for an educational display project. I have found that the original information indicated that it was designed for Nitro powder and up to 3" shells. What is the serial number of your gun?
 
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