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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My daughter is 10yrs old and wants to start shooting trap in school this next year. With that being said I am wanting to get her a trap gun so I can work with her this summer. She has never shot a shotgun really but has her own 22. What are you guys thoughts on a shotgun for her and where might I find one. Here is the crappy part, her LOP is 12in. she is 4'10" tall. I also don't want to spend ALOT of money because i dont know if she will like it or not. If she does and wants to continue we can upgrade in the future. So i was hoping to find one for around the $500 mark or less. Once again help me out guys and thanks alot in advance.

My thoughts are

Rem. 1100
Beretta 303
 

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1100 or 303 (softest shooting), and save the original stock. Buy a used stock and cut it. When you sell the gun later, put the original wood back on it.
 

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really shouldn't go below 13 inch lop, a 1100 with a 13 inch will work ,have her lean forward, if a righty all her weight on her left foot. big difference between shootin a rifle and a shotgun.
 

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I have no experience with kids and trapshooting. But... if a friend of mine asked me what would be a good start for a 10 year old (boy or girl), that is 4' 10" that is actually going to start shooting regulation trap, with the intention of improving, my concerns would be the weight of the gun, so they don't need to adopt a stance of leaning back to support it, and a load that is both capable of breaking a target, and that will not cause undue recoil. I would assume the amount of recoil a 10 years old can handle is way different than what an adult can handle. We're talking shotguns here, not 22's.

Some ideas... a light 20 ga. that can have the stock shortened to her LOP. You may need to build up the comb, there are several ways to do that. Then... the low recoil ammo. Midway USA sell a Fiocchi 20 ga. load that is 3/4 oz. of #7 1/2 that goes 1075 fps for $81.99 a flat.

By the way... when you say your daughter is 10 and will start shooting trap in school, what grade is she in?
 

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I couldn't agree more with Setterman. Buy a used stock to hack off as there are way too many nice trap guns now so short it makes me tear up. DO NOT EVER CUT ANY STOCK. Guns are forever and never seem to end up in dumpsters, so think of the next generation before hacking on it. Start her out with light loads and she will be the one to know if she is ready. You Go Girl, and have fun.
 

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Remington 1100 in 20ga. Get a used stock to cut on, or I think Jack West makes a youth length stock that is already 13" LOP.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the information. She will be 10yrs old next month and will be in 6th grade next you so she will be able to shoot. I understand we are talking about shotguns and not .22 but I was just saying that is what she has had experience shooting. A .22 rifle and a shotgun is like comparing an apple to an orange. She has shot 410 a few shots but once again it dont fit her at all. My son is 13 and he is shooting an old daly single barrel but his LOP is 14 so that isn't so hard to find and he is big enough to have no trouble handling it.

If anybody has any youth models or know of any PM because I am going to get her something. She can't learn with any of my shotguns because they don't fit her.
 

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Today I purchased a Beretta 1301 Competition in 12 gauge for my 12 yr. old son from Gipson's Firearms. The length of pull is 13" with spacers included to bring it out to 14 1/2". The barrel length is 21" and also available in 24". What he really likes is the over sized bolt handle and the over sized closer button. He was having a tough time with the closer of a borrowed 20 gauge.

This shotgun was made for 3 gun matches, but the light weight and short length work very well as a kid's gun. The mechanics are not quite the same as the Beretta A400, but Gipson's price was less than half of the A400.
He was averaging around 10-12 out of 25. These were his first registered targets.

The grip checkering is pretty rough, and that was his one complaint. For an adult, the grip was fine, but for a kid, it is a little sharp. We are planning on getting him a pair of gloves, until his hands toughen up.
I would have preferred the 24" barrel, but this is a starter gun.
The gun comes with an IC choke tube, but Karen was nice enough to throw in a Mod extended tube.
He was shooting 1 oz. loads, and I am going to reload a few 7/8 oz, just as a comparison.

One hundred birds were a little too much, he was done at 75. He was upset about not finishing the 100, but I was happy he went as far as he did.
He was getting tired, and his mount was getting crooked enough to start a nasty bruise.
When he mounted the gun where it belonged, he was very comfortable with it.

We still need a shell catcher, the only one I can find that will work is the Birchwood Casey stick on. I have one, but I haven't put it on yet.

I hope your daughter has a long and happy shooting adventure!

regards,

Todd
 

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Of the two you post, I would opt for the 1100, just because they are ubiquitous. You can find them, and parts/barrels/etc. for them almost under every rock. An auto is a wise choice for her. Even so, I would not go too light. Check out your local clubs. Both of the clubs I belong to have youth guns that you can check out so your youngster can shoot. One of the clubs has an active youth shooting program. If you can find one in your area, bring your daughter so she can check out the guns used, the ammo, etc. Chances are excellent she will be able to try out a few guns, especially from girl shooters. You may find she handles recoil very well and that may open up other gun possibilities.

A note on ammo. You will find that the velocities listed on an ammo box may not be accurate. I have one brand of 20b ammo that lists 1200fps on the box. The 9 shot shoots soft, but the 8 shot kicks like a mule. If you have to buy factory, the STS Managed Recoil loads are effective, soft, and will operate an auto. If you reload, 20b 3/4oz loads at 1150-1200fps work perfectly well for Skeet and 16 yard trap. Another thought- consider the recoil pad you put on. Girls have longer necks. If you buy a gun with a trap or sporting stock and have her mount it correctly, the heel of the stock will dig in and it will hurt. An adjustable butt plate and/or a Rocker style pad will help.
 

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Just did a Boy Scout trap shoot this past weekend at one of the sports clubs I belong to. I was on the range with the youngest shooters, some at least as small as your daughter. We had a range of cut down shotguns for the youths to use but by far the one that worked the best for the new shooters was the 1100. Too bad we only had one of these since the guys using pumps were having a rather uncomfortable experience compared to whom ever got to use the 1100.
 

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I couldn't agree more with Setterman. Buy a used stock to hack off as there are way too many nice trap guns now so short it makes me tear up. DO NOT EVER CUT ANY STOCK. Guns are forever and never seem to end up in dumpsters, so think of the next generation before hacking on it. Start her out with light loads and she will be the one to know if she is ready. You Go Girl, and have fun.
Stocks are replaceable. It's a piece of wood and they are growing more as we speak. I haven't had a trap gun yet that the wood was serial numbered to the receiver. When I buy a trap gun, it is my new trap tool. Like the other tools in my shop, I customize them and set them up to my liking. I don't worry about resale. If one of my guns hits the road, it's the buyers to do with what he wants. If he wants a new stock, he can buy one. I'm damn sure not gonna buy two stocks. I take damn good care of my guns but I do not worry about the trivial stuff like shortening a stock to fit me.
 

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A correct fitting gun is important. I don't know about the 20 ga. version of the 1100, but before you remove and cut the stock to fit on a 12 ga. 1100 be sure not to go less than the action spring tube. I didn't take mine apart to find out, but I doubt it can be shortened for a 12 inch LOP
 

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You might want to look at the H&R "Parnder Compact"
20 gauge, break open, LOP = 12.5", 5.5 lbs, 22' barrel & should be well under $250 retail. Action requires to manually cock the hammer which makes it a very safe youth gun. I have taught many kids that started w/ this gun.
I started my son with a 20 ga. single shot H&R. I had to cut the stock but was able to add a pad as he grew. He had no problems and it is safer than a semi auto with a new shooter. You can probably find a used on for around $100.
 

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1100 cut to as short as it will allow. Add the thinnest urethane pad you can get from Terminator, Kick ease or Trapdude's "gooey pads".
 

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Remington makes an 1170 20 ga in a "Youth" version. We use them for our woman on Target program. The stocks come with different pads, and it's not a bad gun for a beginner. We bought them for about 6oo dollars each. Very soft shooting, and great for a young lady! Lorrie
 

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A 20 gauge gas gun should do the trick.
A Remington 1100 or 1187 or any of the Beretta semi's should be fine if you cut the stock. If you buy used, they hold value well too
 
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