Trapshooters Forum banner

WTB COLT SAA

3852 Views 17 Replies 6 Participants Last post by  Rebel Sympathy
PM Sent
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

· Premium Member
Joined
·
6,031 Posts
I have a pair of Colt Single Action Army P1850's. New (only factory fired)with no turn marks on the cylinders and the Colt 175 year anniversary rollmark on the barrels (manufactured in 2011). They are NOT consecutively numbered. They would come with the original blue colt boxes and the white sleeves that go over the boxes. I would only be interested in selling the pair.

Thanks,

Dominick
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
611 Posts
I have a beautiful Colt 45 SAA I would consider selling.

This gun has a SN# of 68XXX, that's right 5 digets, that makes a 1880's mfg.

Has after market grips, a replaced hammer, the rest is orginal.

It also has a short (cowboy) barell that would come with the gun.

Photo's

Hal



 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,489 Posts
Not trying to bust your bubble, but both those barrels are at least as new as late 1960's as evidenced by the large front sights (changed about 1912) and the letter spacing between "Colt Single Action Army .45". This style barrel caliber marking first appeared in 1929. But, it was not until the late 1960's that the words had that much spacing between each as does yours.

Also, the cylinder flutes appear to be shallow for a pre WW-II SA cylinder and there is no visible radius between the flutes - not sure but looks to be about same vintage as the barrels. An original 1880's cylinder would have had a prominent radius between each cylinder flute.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
227 Posts
I like USFA single actions and would love to own one. They made one a few years ago called the Gunfighter. It was a great gun to handle and the action was as smooth as glass. I passed up on a good used one and now kick myself for it.
Jim
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
611 Posts
Rebel,

You could be right....but not completely. The short barrel was purchased in

the late 60's. The long barrel was on the gun when it was purchased. A gunsmith

here that I had put the orginal barrel back on the gun said that he felt it was

the orginal barrel. He also pointed out that the numbers on the cylinder

matched the SN# on the frame. So if you are wrong about the cylinder....what

else?

I am no Colt expert, but you might want more information before you "bust"

bubbles.

Hal
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,489 Posts
Hal:

I said I was not sure about the cylinder; couldn't have stated that more clearly. I could probably tell if I could actually see it. As for matching numbers, I have seen many, many Colts and replaced Colt parts which have been numbered to match. I am confident the barrels - both of them - are mid to late 1960's or newer. I saw the photos you posted under the "old things" thread and the barrel caliber markings on both barrels are late 1960's or newer.

I started collecting single actions about 1971. I have owned at least a hundred of them - 1st, 2nd and 3rd generations; mostly 1sts. I am a life member and been active in the Colt Collectors Association for over 20 years, having recently finished serving on the board and as treasurer for eight years. None of that makes me a "Colt single action expert", but I might know more about single action originality than a local gunsmith who screwed a barrel back into a frame and indexed it.

While I'm at it, I may as well tell you, for a gun made in 1880 your frame is wrong also. Your cylinder base pin is retained by a transverse screw, nut and spring. That method of retention didn't appear on Colt single actions until around serial number 165XXX, or about 1896-7. And it did not become common until about serial number 167000. An 1880 Colt would have the base pin held in place by an in-line screw coming up through the front of the frame below the barrel, upward at about a 45-degree angle. The tip of that screw itself extends into the groove in the base pin and holds it in place.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
611 Posts
Rebel,

You are right... had the gun checked out by a local colt guy.

He said that while all the parts were Colt, they were several years of 1st.

gen. Cyl. was right for the frame but that was about the only two that matched.

He also said that it was more than likely put togather to shoot mod. ammo. at

cowboy action shoots.

Guess I will gust give to my son as he wants it.

Thanks for your knolage and info. put me on the right track.

Hal
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,489 Posts
Barfin:

You are right. However, the "VP" did not start showing up until sometime in 1905. Not all 1905 shipped guns have the "VP". I once owned 262666. It lettered 1905 but did not have the "VP" proof mark. I also owned 267XXX (can't remember the whole number) and it did have the "VP". And I have seen other 1905 guns, both with and without the "VP". Regardless, Colt started advertising them for smokeless powder at 180000 as you said.

Currently I am playing around with 289331, 45 X 4-3/4", shipped to New Orleans in 1907. Still, I will not shoot more than "cowboy" loads in it, just to be on the safe side.

Mike
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
611 Posts
Rebel

The SN# is on the frame in front of the trigger guard. It is 68010.

The front of the cylinder has the Colt horse on it and is marked 010.

I have shot smokless ammo in it with no bad effects, except what I was shooting

at.:)

Thanks again for you imput.

Hal
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,489 Posts
Hal:

Usually the horse is on the rear face of the cylinder between two chambers. The last three digits of the serial number are on the front face of the cylinder near the base pin bushing. Also, the horse marked cylinders are second generation cylinders (1955-1975). If, indeed, the gun is a second generation frame and cylinder, then the frame serial number should - at least at one time - have had an "SA" suffix. That would make it a 1973-74 range frame and cylinder. In that case, the barrel(s) are of the correct vintage to match the frame and cylinder.

If that is what it is, it will be plenty strong for firing modern standard velocity ammo.

Mike
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
611 Posts
Mike

You are right again. The horse is on the rear of the cyl. and the 010 is on the front.

The compelete SN# is 68010SA. The loading gate has the number 121 on the inside face.

The only other numbers I can find is the pat. dates of Sept. 19, 1871, July 2

72, Jan 19, 75.

Aha... After pulling the grips off I found more numbers... on the left side of

the backstrap is 68010SA, on the trigger strap (under the grips) is 68010SA.

The bottem of the grip metal has a screw in the front.

Don't want to take it apart any more to find other numbers.

But you have sure gave me an education on my Colt.

Thanks

Hal
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,489 Posts
Hal:

Well, I'd say you have a 2nd generation Colt Single Action Army made about 1973-74. This would explain why the cylinder flute depth and lack of bevels and radius curves caught my attention in the first place. The good news is, the metal in your gun is much stronger than a gun made in the 1880's or even the early 20th Century. It should be a great "shooter" and probably one of the barrels is the original.....

The 121 is the assembly number. You should have a match to it on the rear face of the frame, right side. You will have to remove the right side grip to see it on the back of the frame. Colt did that so that the frame and loading gate could be paired back up after case coloring.

I am glad this worked out to where we are not angry at each other. Life is too short for that.

Take care,

Mike
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top