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I was thinking tonight about the first time my dad took me shooting. It was on a hill outside of town, and I was shooting cans on the ground. I was shooting a 20 ga. and was around 9 years old at the time. The wierd thing was as I was thinking back, all of a sudden I remembered the smell of the powder. As fast as I remembered the smell, it was gone. I do know that it was a different smell then I smell now, when shooting. Has anyone had a similar experience, thinking about something long ago and remembering a smell?
 

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It's called "Olefactory memory"...and is one of the most powerful brain stimulators known. That said....I have a similar memory. Dad gave me my first shotgun as a Christmas present,when I was 8 yrs. old. Dwight Eisenhower was President. It was a single shot .410,with a box of shells. He would take me out to shoot hand thrown cans...then eventually took me bird hunting with our Weimaraner "Stormy". The smell of those paper hulled .410 shells on a cold Ft. Lauderdale morning (must have been in the lower 50's) takes me to another place and time.
Thanks for bringing that to mind at this Christmas time.
MERRY CHRISTMAS To ALL..!!!
 

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I remember the Christmas morning, extremely cold in MA, when I received from Santa my Daisy Red Ryder. Anyone ever pull the trigger with the lever open?? WOW,it was cold and did it hurt. Some lessons in life are learned easier than others.LOL. Have a very Merry Christmas, Bob
 

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When I was a trap boy, most shooters at the local club shot Federal paper shells. I remember the smell of Federal papers shells and burning leaves in the Fall well.

I do not remember the smell of cow manure or cleaning out the chicken house and I will do nothing that might improve my memory of these things.

Pat Ireland
 

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My older cousins always took their beagles and went rabbit hunting on Thanksgiving morning. I think I was 10 when I was with them one morning, one of my cousins gut shot a rabbit from about 30 feet. They made me carry that thing the rest of the day. A smell I'll never forget. Got Dad's .22 Marlin bolt action and took up squirrel hunting. Wayne
 

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I remember very well buying ammo buy the single cartridge. .22 shorts were a penny each and 12ga shells were 10 to 15 cents apiece. A whole box of 12ga shells cost about $2--a princely sum back then for a kid running a paper route. No one had ever heard of a PLASTIC shotgun shell. All were paper and smelled like heaven.
 

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I remember the olfactory signature of borrowing a new car and with a new girlfriend back in high school. We won't entirely go there. Merry Christmas!
 

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I don't remember registered targets at $5.35 but I sure remember $8/100. Also recall when cases of shells were 20 boxes for less than we pay for 10 now.
 

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The smell of federal papers I did not have to load on a single stage Texan as I saved my grass cutting money to go dove hunting with my long departed and missed Dad. Happy New Year, Jeff
 

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Dad and I and a 922 H&R and Hiawatha .22s at $3 per carton. Smelled a little like Red Dot from a Federal paper does today. Also remember the smell of our Springer when wet. Don't like to remember that one, or the smells she left in the car on the way home after we shared sausage and jerky with her.
 

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I was five, Dad took me out to finish off a wounded antelope on the ranch. The old 30-30 Winchester carbine, held together with electric tape, was supported on the half-way rolled down window. I had to remember to hold the lever tight so the grip safety would allow the gun to fire. I held the sights where he told me, behind the middle of the shoulder. The metal butt wasn't all the way into my shoulder when the gun went off. The recoil must have knocked me half way across the truck. I didn't see the buck fall, I was crying so hard, but it was one of the greatest moments of my life. Yes, I still remember the smell of the gun powder. A month later I shot my first mule deer. AJ
 
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