Trapshooters Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
501 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just stumbled upon this...

1968 or 2014, his is great advice:

http://vimeo.com/39200770
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,822 Posts
Words of wisdom from a man who has done it. Reminds me of when Sean Hawley gives advice, he doesn't say a lot, but what he says carries a lot of weight and will gain you birds. Scott
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
501 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Yes. Tom Garrigus was an excellent shot - and coach. And his son, Robert, is a successful professional golfer.

From Wikipedia:

"In 1968, Garrigus won a spot on the United States Olympic Team to compete at the Summer Games held in Mexico City, and was still a member of the U.S. Air Force Shooting Team. He was the youngest member of the U.S. shooting team at the Games. Competing in shooting for Men's Trap, he won the silver medal for this shotgun event. Garrigus tied for second place in the event, with John Braithwaite of the United Kingdom winning the gold medal with a world record score of 198.

Held on October 19, the event had a three-way tie for second place between Garrigus, Kurt Czekalla of East Germany, and Pavel Senichev of the Soviet Union all with a score of 196. In the first shoot-off between the three competitors, Czekalla and Garrigus had scores of 25 in this event where clay pigeons are shot, while Senichev was eliminated with a score of 22. Garrigus then defeated the East German in the second shoot-off with a score of 25 to 23. This was the highest finish for an American in the event since Mark Arie won the gold medal in 1920."

He broke 246 ex-250 - and had to settle for Silver. I wonder why, today, with all the advances in guns and shells, we don't see scores like this any more.
I guess it's the 24 gram load cap.

-JW
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,343 Posts
John

We do see scores like those but they are in the shorter events. Remember the current Olympic course of fire is 125 Targets and it take at least 122 or better to get into the final. Unlike ATA the ISSF does not want to see perfect scores and will toughen up the rules if they get too many.

T
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,758 Posts
Great video. Thanks for sharing.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,644 Posts
I have never been able to understand the mentality of the ISSF. Who cares if a perfect score is shoot now and then? I would be more interested to see what the AVERAGE score has been thru the years from the 36gm to the now 24gm load restrictions. Has it really done anything but make the shells lighter? I mean, these guys, and the women too for that matter, still make perfect scores in the finals where only one barrel is allowed. Is that the next step? Single barrel OT?
Has there ever been any question about who has actually won an event? There have been shoot offs in Oly shooting games since Day One. Well, now and then anyway. The ISSF makes some really stupid rules all around just look at what they've done to Universal Trap and ABT. And why???? Just cuz apparently.

BTW - Tom Garrigus was coaching for the US when my wife went to the Olympic Training Center and she thought he was a fine coach, as well as a simply great person.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,343 Posts
semperfi909

ISSF does not have anything to do with UT or ABT. They only cover Olympic Trap, Skeet and Double Trap.

Tom
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,644 Posts
Oh, yeah - FITASC

sometimes hard to keep the stupid apart since it seems like they are in a contest for screwing the shooters.

If the gymnasts had the same sort of organizational support they'd be performing on concrete floors.

thanks for the reminder
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
629 Posts
Tom used to laugh when he told of shooting off w/ the German. He would poker chip the target, then as the German was preparing and just before the chip hit the ground he would shoot it and visibly shake the German.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
501 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
I am informed that Bob Braithwaite passed away last week. I think the most fitting tribute is this, found at his Wikipedia page:

"Though he won many other events during his career inevitably it is for his Olympic victory that he is best remembered. Braithwaite’s achievement represents one of the last occasions in the history of the Olympic Games in which a gifted amateur with steely determination and great skill won over a field consisting predominantly of commercially sponsored and government funded professionals."

-J.W.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top