Trapshooters Forum banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,232 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've heard dents can be removed to some degree with a wet towel and an iron/heat gun.
If this is true, could someone please post an explanation of the process?
I'd hate to make the wood worse trying to remove a cosmetic blemish.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,021 Posts
Gun stocks are fairly dry wood. By using a wet towel you get water into the wood and by heating the moisture vaporizes and essentially expands inside the wood to 'raise' the dent.

For this to work the finish needs to be off the affected area - to allow the water to enter. If the dent is severe enough that is not a problem, but if the surface isn't broken this technique may not work very well.

Food for thought.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
486 Posts
A wet cloth or cleaning patches and a soldering iron with a flat tip first get the iron hot if it is not hot enough it will not create the steam needed. Next place the wet patch on the dent and place the iron on the patch move the iron around just like ironing cloths and watch the heat will dry the patch out so keep the patch wet and watch to not burn the wood. As for the finish should be removed around the area first then steam the dents out it can take time depending on the dents and the wood then sand and refinish.

In gun smithing instructor looked at my stock I made from a blank that I was ready to put finish on and said good job but there is a dentist in the side of the stock is said no there isn't. The head took the back of a claw hammer and hit the stock and put a deep dent in it and said there a dentist now!!! Now you can fix it. It took some time but I got the dent out. I hope this helps. Any questions just ask. Zack H.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,032 Posts
Wood is fibrous. When the wood gets dented the fibers get compressed. Heat and water causes the compressed fibers to expand back towards their original shape. Make sure you use a cloth like cotton that will withstand heat. Don't use a synthetic or synthetic blend that will melt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,195 Posts
I've done this successfully on numerous woodworking projects. Steaming works if the wood fibers have not been broken; if they have been broken, you will be dissapointed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25,277 Posts
I've taken many dents out of old gun stocks with a heavy duty soldering iron with a large flat tip, and a thick, wet cloth diaper. This works very well on dents. Even large deep dents can be taken out.

The cloth needs to be wet, not damp. Does not need to be dripping, though. You need to force water into the dented area, by turning it into steam. If your soldering iron scorches the diaper, the diaper was not kept wet enough.

The iron I'm using is an old hand me down from the 1950s, and was quite large. It's original purpose was probably for soldering tin plated sheetmetal together. The point is, a soldering iron for delicate electronics is not going to work well. You need to produce continuous heat, not have the water wind up cooling an iron that's too small to made sustained heat and steam.

As I said, this works well on dents. What it does NOT work on are gouges. There's simply no way to steam out something that ain't there. And, dents that are actually torn into the wood will be a problem, and will probably need a resin based glue to impregnate where the torn wood meets again. These will not work as nicely as true dents.

And while some dents will come out with only a few minutes work, others may need to be steamed over a period of days, a bit each day.
 
  • Like
Reactions: bsd

·
Registered
Joined
·
917 Posts
I've used an old tea kettle - the kind that whistles.
Get water hot to whistle, with the steam coming out the hole, stick a small finish nail under the spout (if you can't stand the whistle) and play the dent over the steaming hole. I've done it several times and it worked fine (finish off too).
 

·
Supporting Vendor
Joined
·
9,780 Posts
Depends on the finish. If it's a cheap factory oil finish, like Beretta's or Browning's, the water may penetrate, but will likely discolor the area being ironed. If it's a poly finish, it will NOT work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,317 Posts
If your stock is poly you will have to refinish it or pay someone to do it for you. If this is the case then hold off for a few more and get them all fixed at the same time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,100 Posts
Yes....a clothes iron and a wet wash cloth works fine! This may be a good time to
learn to strip And refinish a stock. A gloss finish can be scraped off. A good OIL
finish can simply be repaired. If you refinish a stock be sure to keep the recoil
pad ON THE STOCK and mask if while sanding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Assuming this is hit or miss. Seen youtube video's but never heard of someone using this method with positive results.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,384 Posts
Tea kettle is my go to choice. If you have a poly finish, try an awl and poke (break tiny holes) holes through the finish, in order to allow vapor to get to the wood. You will then have to perhaps wet sand the area and polish the ar will always see the tiny holes you made
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top