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With the weather changing for those of us up north or in the mountains of various states what are you running for primary heat? What runs best for your climate? What fuels do you rely on? Total cost year round vs. Gas/Oil/Electric heat? What do you save per year; dollar wise?

I run a 3.4 cubic foot Enerzone stove with a blower burning a mixture of hardwood and cordwood alternative blocks (compressed sawdust alike pellets). Great heat for a 1,600 sq ft ranch. Replaced door gasket this year and made a huge difference in wood consumption, only fired for 3 days.
 

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We have a 1900 Sq foot rambler. We heat the house all winter on about 75 bags of pellets. The total cost is about $350.00. Our worst winter in the last 12 years was 82 bags and out warmest winter was 65 bags. I have no complaints about the heat other than my wife keeps the house too warm.

If you buy a pellet stove by one that is designed for a larger house. The stove we have was listed for a 3200 Sq foot house. The cost of the stove was around $3000.00 12 years ago but you get what you pay for.

You need a good quality ceiling fan as well to move the air around the house.
 

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I use a fire place we go through about 2 to 3 cords of wood a year. All depends on the wood and the temps for that year keeps my heating bill around 55.00 a month which includes the gas heater that keeps the garage at 50 degrees. I'm not a wood snob I burn any wood that's free even pallets and shipping tonnage.
Thinking of getting a corn stove for down stairs.
 

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I bought a lightly used Breckwell pellet stove four years ago. We like it, keeps the houses warm and is relative easy to maintain. I also like just watching the fire at night with all the lights out. Our house is not set up to allow the warm air to circulate from the stove like it needs to so we have some rooms that are chilly. The most I've ran through it was last winter and we used three tons, but it was pretty darn cold around here for several weeks. On a average most of the time it's a little over two tons. Much cheaper then $230 gas bill we were getting every month.
 

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I run a pellet stove most winter days and let the furnace take over at night. Fire scares me.
Moving air with fans can hurt you more than it helps. Ceiling fans will often cool the air as it moves it which will defeat the purpose. I have spent days on end playing with different speeds and lengths of time on vs off. Always warmer with fan off.
Try this, it might surprise you...
In the room with the heat source, hold a tissue at the top of any doorway then move it to the bottom. Top is the direction of the warm air. Bottom is cooler and will always be going into the room. Place a small fan on the floor to help move the cool air into the room with the heat source. You don't want to blow this air, just help it along. This will then aid in moving the warm air out to other rooms that need it, trust me, the warm air will find it's place. Also, don't think you're doing yourself any favors by trying to help move the warm air with a fan, it will only cool it faster.
 

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I run a pellet stove most winter days and let the furnace take over at night. Fire scares me.
Moving air with fans can hurt you more than it helps. Ceiling fans will often cool the air as it moves it which will defeat the purpose. I have spent days on end playing with different speeds and lengths of time on vs off. Always warmer with fan off.
Try this, it might surprise you...
In the room with the heat source, hold a tissue at the top of any doorway then move it to the bottom. Top is the direction of the warm air. Bottom is cooler and will always be going into the room. Place a small fan on the floor to help move the cool air into the room with the heat source. You don't want to blow this air, just help it along. This will then aid in moving the warm air out to other rooms that need it, trust me, the warm air will find it's place. Also, don't think you're doing yourself any favors by trying to help move the warm air with a fan, it will only cool it faster.
Thermodynamics don't work that way. You don't cool air by moving it. You may mix in cool air but you have raised the temperature of the mass.
 
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Whatever it is, a small fan moving cool air into the hot room heats the house better than a fan trying to move the hot air to cool room.
 

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I agree with flash max. The fan is not cooling the room it is cooling you. Air movement across your body will cool you down.

If you turn your heater on in the car you do you turn the fan off to warm the interior?
 

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I run a 2,400 sq ft in the SE-AK rainforest. While we really only have a week or so of deep sub-zero winter temps, we have long periods of sub-32F temps and the rainforest keeps in the moisture. We run oil heat for hot-water baseboards, but we have a pellet stove to knock the chill off. The oil heat in 3-zones is all on programmable thermostats to keep the house reasonably warm in the evenings, and then we use the pellet stove as a peaking heat when the chills set in. It also kicks in right before we wake up to knock the chill down. As such we go thru a bag of pellets every 4th day or so in deep winter, and every 2-3 weeks otherwise.
 

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When I see or hear pellet stove I think

"What happens when the power goes out?"

Family friends replaced their moms Franklin stove with a pellet stove. Almost 30 days of that winter the area did without electricity. They dang near froze her to death! The pellet stove they bought had all sorts safety features that didn't allow burning anything without electricity!

I do admit to liking lazy man gadgets, but when you need heat and the lectrisity broke a good old fashioned log burner is running circles around something that needs an outside source of power.
 

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What squad am I on?
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When I see or hear pellet stove I think

"What happens when the power goes out?"

Family friends replaced their moms Franklin stove with a pellet stove. Almost 30 days of that winter the area did without electricity. They dang near froze her to death! The pellet stove they bought had all sorts safety features that didn't allow burning anything without electricity!

I do admit to liking lazy man gadgets, but when you need heat and the lectrisity broke a good old fashioned log burner is running circles around something that needs an outside source of power.
I'll be honest, I do have somewhat of a concern about a power outage (although I've not yet had to deal with it while the stove's running).
I'm not an electrician by any means but I would think that keeping a 12V battery on a tender, hooked up to an inverter might get you by for a couple hours. I also have a portable generator and a couple extension cords that would get me by as well. I am curious what it would take to run such an appliance off 12V power and how long it would last....anybody?
 

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In the last 35 years I started with wood in a fireplace, next a forced air wood furnace, then a pellet furnace; and finally am to old and lazy so went to a gas furnace.
I hated the pellets, I could buy firewood cheaper than pellets and the labor I saved dealing with firewood was offset with the weekly dirty job of cleaning the pellet furnace.
 

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I have a pellet stove in my walk out basement that we burn when it`s either extremely cold or when we are burning the wood burning insert upstairs thus no furnace heat in the basement . We can keep our basement at 72-74* @ 1 bag every 22 hrs .
 

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When I see or hear pellet stove I think

"What happens when the power goes out?"
Nothing different. My pellet stove has a 12V car battery hooked up that will keep it running for hours w/o house power. If it's already running, you're good. If it was shut off, you have to use small primer pellets to get it started by hand but then the 12V battery will keep it running. There's a small trickle charger on the battery so it is always charged and ready to go.

....then a pellet furnace; and finally am to old and lazy so went to a gas furnace.
I hated the pellets, I could buy firewood cheaper than pellets and the labor I saved dealing with firewood was offset with the weekly dirty job of cleaning the pellet furnace.
Alternatively, I like the fact that my wife can add a bag of pellets whenever she wants, instead of going outside to haul in chopped firewood. We had a woodstove, but the "instant on" feature of the pellet stove makes it so much nicer for her to get going. Cleaning the ash (there's very, very little) is almost inconsequential compared to cleaning up a wood stove. And....I don't spend all summer hunting for firewood.
 

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I go through about 6-8 cords of wood a winter. Had a pellet stove in my last house and pulled it out and put in a wood stove. I have a hard time paying for something that I can get for free.
 

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I have a hard time paying for something that I can get for free.
Depends how you value your time. I see folks around me who heat with wood stoves spend a good majority of their free time all spring-summer-fall hunting wood for the winter. There have been dust-ups over fallen trees as to whom got there first or had "dibs". To each their own. I have other things to do with my time so buying a few bags of pellets allows me to spend my time in other avocations, like reloading.
 
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