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Discussion Starter #1
Well I'm pretty broke due to my trap addiction, but this inexpensive project piece got the buy a gun itch a scratching. This is a well used Winchester 94. It may look like it has some years on it, but I believe it is only from 1979. It has some unsightly screwdriver marks on the receiver. The wood has been drilled for sling studs. It is still solid and functioning. There is a little play in the action, but this being my first lever gun that may be expected. I don't know.

So here are my plans that I'm turning over in my head. It's kind of a rough idea. I have a lot of questions on best practices for the DIYer. If you have any quick suggestions I'd like to hear them. I have only refinished the stock on a Turkish Mauser M38 before.

1a)Wood- I believe it is Walnut. I bought an Oak dowel rod with thoughts of drilling the stud holes out to fit the rod. On second thought the grain would be going the wrong way. So I'm planning on wedging a piece in horizontal with wood epoxy and some sawdust to fill the void.

1b)Should I use stripper on the wood to remove the lacquer and finish? Or just sandpaper?

1c)Do I then need to use varnish on the wood?

1d)Then finish coat it with TruOil?

2a)Metal- Sandpaper and steel wool to clean the blueing off? Or should I use some solvent?

2b)There is some negative space by the screws where a screwdriver tore up the receiver. I'm thinking on Tig welding it back to level and then filing it down. I've welded once and it wasn't good so they said.

2c)Looking at my friends most of the internal action parts were blued except for it looked like the locking bolt was left alone. Should I go to town and coat everything?

2d)What should I use to blue. I need something easy for my first blueing. Do I use the same stuff for internal and external?

2e)I'm thinking I'm going to leave the barrel on the receiver during the process. I have some lead and could make a barrel vise, but I don't want to get in over my head.

2f)Should I try and take some slop out of the action and tighten some things up by adding some more metal?

If it turns out halfway decent I'll post some pictures along the way.

:)
 

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Hey Sean The post-64 receivers are investment cast you would be alot better off having it plated. Hope this helps.

Roger
 

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Sean, You can have the receiver rust blued but it requires removing and refitting the barrel. I used to build take-down 94's and I had excellent results rust bluing those late ones--post 64--94 Win receivers.
Hope this helps! Phil Simms
 

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Well from your pics I cant tell the year. But if a post 64 then it will have a cast iron frame. Im not a welder so Im not sure if you can weld on it or not. Cast Iron frames are a bear to blue and require a special activator to make the reblue look right. Dura coat would be a good option for the metal. As to the wood I would use a chem stripper and as little sanding as possible. I use tru oil finish on my stocks. I wouldn't try and tighten the action other than tightening the screws. I have pre 64 model 94s One almost NIB condition, all have some play in the actions not as much as the post models I have had. As for the swivel holes I hate them in a 94 but if you plan on hunting with it consider keeping them. If you want to fill. then I would look at getting some black ebony dowel or solid brass rod. either will look better that oak and sawdust. If the gouged metal is still there around the screw holes you maybe able to peen and draw file to look more presentable. I also peen my buggered screws and then spin in a drill and smooth back to new shape. I then recut the slot and oil blue them. A fun project anyway you go.
 

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Check out Duracoat, applied correct it'll out last bluing.
http://duracoat-firearm-finishes.com/
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you gents! I didn't know about the receiver being cast and that is an excellent point. I will keep that in mind during the process.

Reddog that is a very helpful post. Full of helpful hints.

I think I will use Duracoat. The price isn't bad and it looks good and easy. I'm thinking a shinier glossier coat on the outside and barrel. Then more of a flat on the moving internals with the bolt assembly and such. Or maybe the internals should be chemically done. Would Duracoat withstand constant metal on metal?
 

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No problem I have done a lot of projects and my first was a marlin lever in
30-30. it was so pitted I draw filed the whole gun. I removed all the stampings but the serial number, Cold blued the gun re engraved patent dates and caliber stamps and refinished the stocks. I was proud as a pea cock. I later did a professional blue job.

I am not sure if I would do anything (duracoat) to the inside. Is the inside bad? Usually I would just clean all the parts. lube and reassemble. I would be afraid that the tolerances inside might be affected, or bits of the duracoat might scrape off and get clog up the trigger or? You could always strip the blueing off and send to someone that blues. If prepped it shouldn't cost much.

Another way to do the receiver is bead blast and clear coat like pics



 

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The post-1964 Model 94 receivers are made from cast steel. Specifically a type called Graphitic Steel. Here is a description:

<i>"It (graphitic steel) is a kind of quality between conventional cast iron and cast steel, its carbon content is usually between 1.2 ~ 2.3%. It is of high strength and toughness of cast steel roll and also good wear resistance of cast iron roll. The matrix contains a small amount of uniform spherical (point-like) graphite, which gives the alloy graphite steel roll good anti-thermal cracking performance and excellent thermal stability, as well as higher bite friction coefficient, good toughness and wear resistance. In addition, its tensile strength is high with small variation in hardness."</i>

Winchester then coats the surface with an iron matrix that gives the appearance of blueing (black in color, actually). This iron matrix does not take traditional hot or cold blueing. But it does take old fashioned rust blueing.

The problem is when the thin iron coating is worn off. And unfortunately it doesn't take a lot of handling or neglect for this to happen. It's very common to see rust freckling on these receivers. One the coating is worn off or removed, it's difficult to do much with the cast steel other than plate it.

When someone tries to use hot or especially cold blueing, the receiver takes on a mixture of hues ranging from browns to golden colors, and it usually winds up reeking of nitric acid.

Supposedly there is a technique to hot blue it, but it requires a lot of care for temperature of the mix, etc., and doesn't require much variation to fail.

It does plate well, though. I've seen bright chrome, black chrome, nickel and brass used. The first three have either been on polished or bead blasted (matte) finishes. Black chrome is the closest to the original black finish.

It can also be rust blued. This is the old fashioned blueing method where the metal is covered with the rust blueing chemical, allowed to turn to a reddish oxide, then is carded off. The process is repeated until a deep finish results. This can take weeks. But it wears much better than modern blueing. Generally the color is a dark blue-gray, not black like modern blueing.
 

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Now, having said all of that, I'm not sure SeanMan30-06's is a post-64. There are some spotting features on the receiver that seems to indicate it may be a pre-64. The photos are pretty poor, so I can't say for certain.

The change occurred around serial number 2,586,000. Below that number it is a pre-64. After that number it is a post-64. If very close to that number, it may have to be identified from photos.

So is your serial number higher or lower than 2,586,000?

If it is lower, then the issue of blueing is a moot point. Hot blueing will work just fine.

Also note that the pre and post 64 buttstocks WILL NOT interchange. The post-64 buttstocks are unique to that model only. The pre-64 Model 1894 buttstocks are actually interchangeable with the 1892 buttstocks. So if you decide to replace the buttstock, the date of the gun is important. Do not let people selling buttstocks at gun shows tell you differently than this. I have found a lot of ignorance from stock sellers who do not believe the 1892 and pre-64 1894 buttstocks are the same, and being stock sellers they ought to know better.

For that matter, most parts between a pre and post 64 Model 94 will not interchange either. Screws especially.
 

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Brian I have to disagree with the point that they plate well. I am a jeweler and once had to replate a golden spike. Well it had to go to the plating shop after I was unable to make it plate and look good. To plate, it had to be copper then nickled then I gold plated it. The plating ended up so thick I had to have a friend and hand engraver Benno Heune recut all the engraving. Then I had to have the action threads recut and the barrel headspaced by gunsmith Ken Genecco. I ended up braking even on the job and was glad I didn't lose anymore than my time. Now I know they might not all go that way but this was my experience. I was glad I had friends that could save my a$$ on that one.
 

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I've seen several plated with chrome, black chrome and nickel, and one with brass, that had no issues. It can and has been done with very good results.

However, you said you had trouble with a Golden Spike model. That version comes with brass plating from the factory. I have not seen one of the brass plated versions redone, only the "blued" versions. There may be a difference in how the brass plated models were done at the factory, and this may have bit you.
 

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Stocks. The stocks in the pics appear to show a lot of dents in them. Provided the wood has not been torn, it is possible to steam the dents out.

This is done with cotton cloth and a steam iron for ironing. A cloth baby diaper actually works well. The iron should be set for cotton, and the cloth needs to be wet, but not sopping wet. Wring it out if need be.

The cloth is placed over the dents and then the iron is placed on the cloth, and gently and slowly moved over the dents while gently pushing down. Don't scorch the cloth. The cloth protects the wood from the hot iron, and it helps fill the dents.

Steam will help expand the cellular walls and raise the dents. It will take some work and may have to be done over a period of a few days.

Do not sand until the dents are raised. And do not sand until the stock has dried for a few days. If any dents reappear prior to sanding, repeat the process.

I've done this to numerous old stocks and have removed some dents that I didn't believe could come out. In fact, I have a huge electric tin smith's soldering iron for doing this now, but it's much faster and hotter than a laundry iron and can quickly cause problems if not watched carefully. But it's more precise due to a smaller contact surface.
 

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Besides the serial number there is another way to tell if it is pre or post 64, and at a glance.

The floor plate hinge pin on a pre64 is a pin with the screw holding it being in the middle of the floor plate

on the post 64 it is a screw running left to right thru the frame and floor plate.

I do not know the process of gold plating jewelry.

I have been blessed to have had access to plating shops since I was in my teens, going on 40 years later I have a chance to get plating done that I prep and take to the plating shop and walk thru myself.

for a post 64 94 win nickle is my preferred finish,

duracoat is very durable,

but TO ME it looks like paint,

and no matter how you cut it, paint on a firearm..........................
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looks like those shovel ready jobs my friends pup leaves for him!

AL
 
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