Trapshooters Forum banner

241 - 260 of 262 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
30,567 Posts
You know, it is really nobody‘s business why I want an expensive gun.
 
  • Like
Reactions: mg1polo

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,754 Posts
It depends on your perspective . To many ,owning a high grade gun with a lot of detailed scroll work and fine wood is a thing to have and there is pride in ownership just like somebody owning a Corvette Porsche. To some of us who are old school. A gun is a tool for the most part. I have owned a couple of pretty nice guns but, my shooting did not improve with them. The majority of my wins over the years have been with 870s , 1100, and model 12s. So there are really two camps. But ,I would stay away from the el'cheapo offerings . The guns I shoot were made solid and are at least 40 years old when quality control was much better. A new trap gun that will hold up to several thousand rounds is not cheap ( even in the less expensive models ) . There are offerings that will fill the bill on a budget but even those cost more than field guns. What you choose to do is up to you but you need a gun that is reliable and that fits you. If you don't have those two qualities in it ,you will not be successful in the game.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,353 Posts
I am new to trap shooting and have seen a wide variety of opinions on purchasing a gun. I personally am a frugal individual who buys more on value than I do on brand name.

After months of research I ended up purchasing a Tristar TT-15 Sporting O/U because for the price point there really isn't anything like it (whether that is good or bad is to be determined, please keep your opinions on my gun selection to yourself)

When I was looking to purchase my research included trying other's guns to see what I like: I shot a Citori, an A400 Xcel, a BT-99, a TT-15 Sporting, a Silver Reserve II sporting, and a Fabarm Elos - funny thing is, the guy with the TT-15 also had the Fabarm (he teaches Trap at the local high school and if a student doesn't have a gun or their gun has a problem they use the TT-15.

I asked him why he had gone with a Tristar for the gun he uses with his athletes given the reputation, he said "Tristar has come a long way, and most wouldn't feel the difference Fabarm vs the Tristar to appreciate the difference any way.

So my question is: other than reliability (which will always be case by case), what are the reasons to move up in price brackets to more expensive guns?

Other than perceived value given by a certain brand, what are the perks that come with owning a $3,000+ dollar gun compared to a <$1,000 gun?

Thanks for your time.

There is a better $1000 Trap gun out there, though prices might start rising. The 1100 Competition Synthetic has everything a Trap shooter needs, plus two things the TT-15 doesn't: a parallel comb, and the Rucker Auto-Buster. An adjustable rib is nice, but not necessary if the comb is adjustable.


Sort of...it's not any more expensive to shoot a high dollar gun than a cheap one. And honestly, in the big picture, the gun's the cheap part. Also, when I bought my first premium gun, Alfermann #263, I knew I should use that money elsewhere but was willing to make a few sacrifices in order to advance my trapshooting career. Needs, wants, desires...they're all open to interpretation when you want something bad enough you'll find ways to make it happen.
I know what you mean. It took me 40 years to get a Ljutic Mono Gun, and one set up perfectly for me at that. (Thanks again, JACK!) I was shooting my 1100 Competition just fine, but I wanted a Ljutic because I'd shot one, and shot it well. I'm doing well with this one, too, and it's a lot easier to clean than the 1100. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
801 Posts
I am new to trap shooting and have seen a wide variety of opinions on purchasing a gun. I personally am a frugal individual who buys more on value than I do on brand name.

After months of research I ended up purchasing a Tristar TT-15 Sporting O/U because for the price point there really isn't anything like it (whether that is good or bad is to be determined, please keep your opinions on my gun selection to yourself)

When I was looking to purchase my research included trying other's guns to see what I like: I shot a Citori, an A400 Xcel, a BT-99, a TT-15 Sporting, a Silver Reserve II sporting, and a Fabarm Elos - funny thing is, the guy with the TT-15 also had the Fabarm (he teaches Trap at the local high school and if a student doesn't have a gun or their gun has a problem they use the TT-15.

I asked him why he had gone with a Tristar for the gun he uses with his athletes given the reputation, he said "Tristar has come a long way, and most wouldn't feel the difference Fabarm vs the Tristar to appreciate the difference any way.

So my question is: other than reliability (which will always be case by case), what are the reasons to move up in price brackets to more expensive guns?

Other than perceived value given by a certain brand, what are the perks that come with owning a $3,000+ dollar gun compared to a <$1,000 gun?

Thanks for your time.
Congratulations on your first gun, and welcome to the world of trapshoooting .

The good news is you got a gun , and you like to shoot . The more you shoot, the more you think . The more you think, the worse you shoot. So you do some more thinking and conclude a different gun will help your scores. Or you pick up a buddies gun and you break out of a slump ..poof .. new gun.

So the important thing is to have fun . I think you’ll do that with what you’ve got .

Take your time. I don’t know anyone that’s an enthusiast who hasnt been curious about the difference in guns . Personally, my Browning 725 feels better to me than some guns much more expensive . It’s the sweet spot for me . I gotta go +$5000 more to find something that feels better in my hands. I don’t shoot enough to justify it .

I know a lot of guys that run old Winchester model 12 pump guns and nothing but . They were not ridiculously expensive in their day, but they were built for the long haul.

As you get into it, you will find features on other guns that work well for you. There will be balance characteristics that make the gun move more naturally. Maybe you got all that in your TT, maybe not . Hi rib vs flat rib , unsingles , trigger feel , stock design fit and feel .

Beware, there are enablers out there that want to share the joy of their expensive toys. I’ve had several guys let me shoot their P Guns and K guns . For my level , I am fine with the 725. But if I could swing it financially , those high end guns do move very naturally. Plus I just like looking at the beauty of them .

I started with a Beretta 20 ga field gun. Then went to a Browning Maxus Sporting Clays gold. I then went for a dedicated trap Gun in the 725 . I feel I can stop there as I won’t get much more juice for the squeeze of a new gun . That said, I have been eyeballing Zoli for a long time . Never say never .

The game is called trap for a reason... “when you try to get out, it pulls you back in “

Have fun on the journey
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
For me the question is who doesn’t want to own a fine shotgun?

Remember, you can easily date ugly women, but why?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,358 Posts
I grew up very poor, until I was out on my own I had never been able to experince hunting or shooting. I purchased a used 870 20 ga plain barrel for about $60.00 this was my start to a life long love. I worked hard to become successful, I had never had a vacation until I was in my 50's in fact in 1979 I only took 4 days off for the entire year including Christmas. I wrecked my body and health during those years. I quit shooting completely from about 1984 until 2002 I have had many surgeries that were serious and several were life threating, I made up my mind after surviving these challenges, it was my time in life.
I resumed shooting and have been lucky enough to meet some of the best friends anyone can ask for. Shooting has been one of my most rewarding experinces. I have shot and owned my great shotguns. The engraved guns to me are as great of work of art as any painting I have ever seen. For my 75th birthday I purchased a Krieghoff model 32 Monte Carlos grade it is in the process of being upgraded and rebuilt, it is my final gun, it even has the Omega symbol on the pistol grip. I will post pictures when it is completed.

But at my age and with the issues of getting older bring, I can look at this gun and reflect on the journey it took to be able to aquire such a beauty. Is it for show not at all. People who know me know that I am still a blue jean and cowboy boot guy. By the grace of God and the opportunity this great country gave me I'm still here and able to shoot this beauty.

Buster
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
I grew up very poor, until I was out on my own I had never been able to experince hunting or shooting. I purchased a used 870 20 ga plain barrel for about $60.00 this was my start to a life long love. I worked hard to become successful, I had never had a vacation until I was in my 50's in fact in 1979 I only took 4 days offf for the entire year including Christmas. I wrecked my body and health during those years. I quit shooting completely from about 1984 until 2002 I have had many surgeries that were serious and several were life threating, I made up my mind after surviving these challenges, it was my time in life.
I resumed shooting and have been lucky enough to meet some of the best friends anyone can ask for. Shooting has been one of my most rewarding experinces. I have shot and owned my great shotguns. The enraved guns to me are as great of work of art as any painting I have ever seen. For my 75th birthday I purchased a Krieghoff model 32 Monte Carlos grade it is in the process of being upgraded and rebuilt, it is my final gun, it even has the Omega symbol on the pistol grip. I will post pictures when it is completed.

But at my age and with the issues of getting older bring, I can look at this gun and reflect on the journey it took to be able to aquire such a beauty. Is it for show not at all. People who know me know that I am still a blue jean and cowboy boot guy. By the grace of God and the opportunity this great country gave me I'm still here and able to shoot this beauty.

Buster
More power to you brother! Keep on keeping on-
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Buy what you can afford. I have seen plenty of great shooters with inexpensive guns. There are also a ton of people who have $10,000 guns and their scores are not any better then whenever they started.
Find a gun that fits you and ignore the herd.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Buy what you can afford. I have seen plenty of great shooters with inexpensive guns. There are also a ton of people who have $10,000 guns and their scores are not any better then whenever they started.
Find a gun that fits you and ignore the herd.
Point well taken - affordability and level of competence. The reason there are still professional photographers is that is how they derive their livelihood. Cell phone cameras are getting better every day, it is true! A lot of people take cell phone pictures that are used by the evening news team, that is true too. Are those cell phone photographers on the same level as the professional - NO! The local news station will spend lots of dollars on processing equipment and hire the best photographer to get those low level light (night) shots! Cell phone cameras often can not produce low level light photos though some are making great progress in this area. Most cell phone photographers do not have the knowledge to properly manipulate those cell phone cameras to maximize the photograph. Professionals will spend what ever it takes to keep their income at a desired level. Having said that, their camera is a tool which is optimized only when the user exerts every bit of sweat and tears as they can muster. Two rules make a winner- practice and the tool they use. If your averages are as high as you can physically and mentally make them it may be time to elevate your game if that is your intention. But your intention and return on the value of that tool comes at a price. Are you prepared to pay for your non-income gratification? That is the question!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
678 Posts
There have been a lot of posts here that I think answer your question very well- fit, finish, hand engraving, etc. one thing I will add (unless I missed it) is that for many, the most priceless gun they own isn’t always the most expensive one. It’s the one their daddy and/or granddaddy used when they were kids and they remember the times they had together. Although not expensive guns, they are guns that did hold up through decades of use and can still be enjoyed. I buy higher end guns for my kids to inherit for that reason. They will have finer guns than my dad or grandad had starting out and they will last multiple lifetimes. For the right price, I could sell any gun I own but two: my dads Beretta that he gave me (thank God my father is still alive so I haven’t inherited his guns) and my best friends Kimber 1911 that I bought from him before he died tragically.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
258 Posts
Since the OP posted this over a year ago I wonder how his TriStar is holding up? How many rounds have gone down the tubes....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
The better question is “How do I get tricked into reading old, dead threads, every time?” Lol Half the time it is someone’s first post too.

I posted on the asking “why pay for a P or K gun“ thread. Best analogy I can think of follows. Wife’s car is black sedan, sport package, tinted windows, leather interior, nice tires and rims. Toyoty Camry SE is a nice car. Last one was BMW 328i. Both had the same featues but the BMW drove way differently and just “felt“ like a precision machine.

I’ve owned or own Brownings and Berettas, but the K gun keels different 🙂
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,772 Posts
Hi All : Frugal, drinks the best scotch, drives an economy mercedes. His kids love him.
I never ever regretted buying a good gun. When the stock market takes a dip and our stocks drop 10-20 %. We have to take it. When we buy a new shotgun and the stock market is up the account does not even notice it.
Please Enjoy ! A good shotgun is a small bonus !!!

Joe Woods/Ontario
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
If you have the money, get want you want. If you don't have the money, buy what you can afford. Shoot what you enjoy. Don't worry about what other people are shooting. Don't look down on people who shoot budget guns and don't envy people who shoot guns that they themselves can't afford. At the end of the day, did you have fun shooting? Isn't that all that matters. Very few of us (definitely not me) will ever be world champion clay shooters.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,232 Posts
I figure life is too short to shoot a cheap gun, be married to an ugly woman, or own a stupid dog. Under the adage “if you can’t be good, try to look good” we all make our gun and equipment choices as we see fit. I see shooters drive to the gun club in a new Lexus or Mercedes and pull out a Remington 1100 or Beretta a400. I also see guys drive up in a 10 year old pick up truck and pull out a Krieghoff, Perazzi, or other high dollar gun.

I am retired and have raised my children, paid for their college tuition (four of them), paid off my mortgage, and shooting is my only past time. I choose to own some reasonably “nice“ guns. Last I looked gun prices seem to be holding their own in the market. Granted you May have a bigger buying audience for a $1,000 shotgun than a $10,000+ shotgun, but the high dollar gun buyer is generally less affected by economic downturns and usually has more discretionary income to spend on “luxuries.”

Until we are all subjugated and are only allowed to shoot government issued guns, I will continue to take enjoyment in owning and shooting nice firearms. Additionally, I will not criticize nor ridicule the gun choice of other shooters.

I can own a Remington 870 or this. I choose the latter.

The View attachment 1731586
\
 
241 - 260 of 262 Posts
Top