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What squad am I on?
Lots of different guns...
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I may not be a Wadhopper or mg yet
MG is in a class all his own ;)

Myself on the other hand....it's one target at a time.
 

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MG is in a class all his own ;)

Myself on the other hand....it's one target at a time.
Your killing me Wad! I'm very luck to have shot and still do shoot with GREAT shooters, but I'm not in there class. Don't get me wrong, I'm good, but they're great! At this point in my life, I'm just glad to be alive. Thanks for the nice comments and I'll see ya at the Cardinal this Summer.
MG
 

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Face it your cheap
But your young and with age comes wisdom
Maybe you will trade your shotgun for golf clubs next year. Maybe not. One day you will put away the paint by numbers kit and have an appreciation for oil on canvas, or a new K80
 

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Face it your cheap
But your young and with age comes wisdom
Maybe you will trade your shotgun for golf clubs next year. Maybe not. One day you will put away the paint by numbers kit and have an appreciation for oil on canvas, or a new K80
I like your comment, but I can see why people don’t have k80’s they really are expensive and that’s from one who has a k gun...
 

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Some of us just aren’t cut out to own a spectacular gun. Saw a friends new Kolar Max Lite Sporting with upgraded wood and the Regal engraving pattern a week ago. I’d be scared to death to take something that beautiful to the line. But that’s me I guess......destined to shoot my 34 year old S682X for the rest of my life.
 

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Thorn in your side
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Some of us just aren’t cut out to own a spectacular gun. Saw a friends new Kolar Max Lite Sporting with upgraded wood and the Regal engraving pattern a week ago. I’d be scared to death to take something that beautiful to the line. But that’s me I guess......destined to shoot my 34 year old S682X for the rest of my life.
Why would you be scared? Do you have a history of dropping your gun? I own several pretty nice guns and have never been scared to take them to the line. The only thing that may be an issue is leaving them unattended in the rack, although if you shoot with several of your buddies typically there is always one there to watch over them while you may be gone for a few minutes.
 

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I lived in Connecticut for a while and belong to a club that was covered up with trap and skeet shooters who were very wealthy. I saw some very beautiful guns and being a young guy it always puzzled me that they would leave there guns unattended. Being young I asked one of the guys weren’t they afraid of theft. The guy I was talking to said “no not really”. He explained that yes the guns were expensive, many were one of a kind with custom engraving but most of the guys who owned them were either doctors, lawyers or judges. He further explained that the guns were mostly highly insured and, however, if someone were to come into his courtroom for theft of one of these guns they would go away for a very long time and besides most who shoot trap and or skeet for the most part are pretty honorable people. I always felt the last part was the truest words said. Most are pretty honorable and just appreciate fine and beautiful guns. Yes, sometimes accidents happen and one gets dropped, then a few cuss words are heard, the gun is repaired and life goes on. We all know [email protected] happens.
 

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Why would you be scared? Do you have a history of dropping your gun? I own several pretty nice guns and have never been scared to take them to the line. The only thing that may be an issue is leaving them unattended in the rack, although if you shoot with several of your buddies typically there is always one there to watch over them while you may be gone for a few minutes.
No history of dropping guns, but a history of paranoia? Yep. Probably dates back to some questionable activities in the 60s.
 

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I could care less about pride of ownership. What matters is how well the particular gun works with me. Of course, the barrels MUST be well regulated (and I do check them right from the go) and the trigger decent, but other than that, it's where the rubber meets the road. The truth of the matter is, expensive guns are expensive for a reason....because they are well designed strictly for target shooting. Not that a cheap gun can't shoot exceptionally well (the Browning line comes to mind), but shooting at the higher levels when it's often a one bird game, the premium guns tend to pull ahead.
 

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Personally I think people that have to ask this question should buy the cheapest gun they feel comfortable with... use the rest of their money on rounds ans clays..... if they like shooting competitively it won’t take long and they will upgrade and understand why they had to do it at that point....... when you shoot enough you can just feel quality and have to have it.. all the disposable guns are no longer an option.
 

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(Not that a cheap gun can’t shoot exceptionally well). (The Browning line comes to mind).

Now Joe, Tron, I usually agree with and enjoy your silly comments, but I wouldn’t call the Brownings a cheap line of gun. Yes, compareed to Kriegoffs, and the like, they are cheaper, but to call Brownings cheap guns is laughable to me. You know better than I that back in the past even less expensive guns were in the winners circle.
 

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I figure life is too short to shoot a cheap gun, be married to an ugly woman, or own a stupid dog. Under the adage “if you can’t be good, try to look good” we all make our gun and equipment choices as we see fit. I see shooters drive to the gun club in a new Lexus or Mercedes and pull out a Remington 1100 or Beretta a400. I also see guys drive up in a 10 year old pick up truck and pull out a Krieghoff, Perazzi, or other high dollar gun.

I am retired and have raised my children, paid for their college tuition (four of them), paid off my mortgage, and shooting is my only past time. I choose to own some reasonably “nice“ guns. Last I looked gun prices seem to be holding their own in the market. Granted you May have a bigger buying audience for a $1,000 shotgun than a $10,000+ shotgun, but the high dollar gun buyer is generally less affected by economic downturns and usually has more discretionary income to spend on “luxuries.”

Until we are all subjugated and are only allowed to shoot government issued guns, I will continue to take enjoyment in owning and shooting nice firearms. Additionally, I will not criticize nor ridicule the gun choice of other shooters.

I can own a Remington 870 or this. I choose the latter.

The
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