which way to go for all around coyote/deer rifle | Page 4 | Trap Shooters Forum

which way to go for all around coyote/deer rifle

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by Diesel Smoke, Apr 17, 2013.

  1. Diesel Smoke

    Diesel Smoke Active Member

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    Ok, it has been a long while since I've posted on this. Time for a little update. I ended up giving my .308 a good scrub down, and took it out to the farm to shoot. I only had factory loads, as I haven't gotten started reloading yet. I'd shoot 3 rounds, and let it cool off while shooting a Remington 770 I had bought (get to that in a minute) It patterned like a shotgun with Winchester super-x, 4-5" groups, brought it down to 3-4" groups with Remington rounds, and finally 2.5-3.25" groups with federal red box cheapo's. All at 100 yrds. Now, I'm sure reloading would tighten it up a little bit but it I'm not too keen on trying to push it out very far.

    Now, on to the Remington 770. I bought it from a buddy of mine, bone stock in 30-06 for $100, after a little research I found some tips for improving the accuracy on it. I free floated the barrel, added weight to the stock and forearm, cleaned the bolt/action thoroughly and adjusted the trigger to a shade over 3#. Shooting the same distance using the same rest, I was able to shoot under 1" groups. I had some hope for this rifle, but unfortunately I got in a jam and needed some money, and sold it to a coworker.

    So here's my idea for a new rig I'm wanting to buy at the beginning of next year. I'm looking at a Remington 700 SPS in .308 with a 20" barrel, Tacticool stock from Boyd's, a Barska 3-12x40 scope (not set in stone on the scope), and a Timney 2.5# trigger.

    As always, any suggestions are welcome. I figured the .308 would work best for me as whitetails will the main target, with the occasional coyote, and I do get in the Ky elk drawing every year (.270 is the smallest legal caliber to hunt them with here)

    Thanks guys
    Smokey
     
  2. CalvinMD

    CalvinMD Well-Known Member

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    I love the 243 and still do but ever since I got a Rem Model 7 in 260Rem the other gun doesn't see near as much daylight..I load the Nosler BTs and it shoots flatter with the same weight bullet..carries more energy and is a very noticeable amount less wind sensitive,..the 260s only drawback is all ammo is handloaded or special order since its not exactly the most popular girl at the dance
     
  3. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    You are looking at (and buying) rifles built to a price point. Remington makes the SPS for people who don't want to spend the money on a better model. No flame intended here, just looking at the facts.

    Accuracy is not an easy thing, and long range accuracy is just short range super accuracy.

    So let's start by tossing out the really insane stuff like tight neck chambers, bullet spin gauges, and really high priced brass.

    That leaves you with stock, trigger, and barrel options.

    Caliber is unimportant here unless you are shooting only factory ammo. If you are on a trip and run out or forget it might be hard to find some for your 7/08 Whiz-Bang at the crossroads gas station. Read up on ballistics and find the flattest shooting round with the most energy out at your extreme distance.

    Federal Premium is going to shoot as good as your abilities, use it.

    Savage makes models with good stocks and triggers, a little more money but worth it.

    Look at the Model 10 Precision Carbine or the Hog Hunter(barrel threaded for muzzle brake if you want one).

    There's a forum called "Long Range Hunting" that is fun to peruse.

    And get as much practice as you can, under hunting conditions if possible.

    HM
     
  4. oleolliedawg

    oleolliedawg Banned User Banned

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    I'd much rather shoot 125 gr. stuff in my .308. Less recoil and plenty for whitetails-shoot great too!!
     
  5. YOTESLAYER

    YOTESLAYER Member

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    .243 gets my vote!
     
  6. texasbilly

    texasbilly Member

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    It would appear to me that you need a rifle and caliber that is capable of reliably killing a deer or coyote at the long ranges you are thinking about. Though a 25/06 and 243 would be excellent for shorter ranges (up to 400 yards), their energy drops off quickly after that. A 7mm magnum is quite capable of killing at the long distances, and of course equally capable at the shorter ranges.
    In the end, whatever you select, it is the proper placement of the bullet that will make the kill.

    tex
     
  7. Doug Kennedy

    Doug Kennedy Active Member

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    It is hard to over look a good 25 06
     
  8. cubancigar2000

    cubancigar2000 Well-Known Member

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  9. timberfaller

    timberfaller Well-Known Member

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    Whatever you decide to pick, get to the range with it, and practice practice practice!

    Doesn't matter what caliber, if you can't hit with it, its of no value.
     
  10. bgf

    bgf Active Member

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    Savage 25-06 or .243 with Accutrigger...Your choice.

    Bernie
     
  11. Bob Butler

    Bob Butler Well-Known Member

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    Smokey,
    did you stay with the original scope on your 7400? The classic look is cool. But it might be the source of your Patterns. Having a rock solid, known to be good scope to test a rifles long range potential is key.
    I am wondering if you are getting issues there.
    I like the Leupolds but there are some very good scopes out now that wont break your bank. Optics forum on the 24hourcampfire web forum is a good place to get feedback.
    A set of dies and a Lee press would help you test the original rig to the fullest with out going crazy on the budget.
    Big Magnification is not essential to small groups. But a scope that holds zero is. Also bullet straightness in the loaded case.
    I think you can likely wring out a bit more accuracy from the family piece.
    There are a lot of good shooting new rifles out there today, but all of them need a good optic to allow you to get the most of it. Dont skimp on the glass.
    Report back if you try the old rig with a new scope. The scope can move on to the new rifle down the road when the money for that frees up.
     
  12. ric3677

    ric3677 Well-Known Member

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    340 weatherby Mag, there's one for sale on the site.

    Rick in MT
     
  13. Mike

    Mike Active Member

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    Mostly close shots with calls or dogs in my neck of the woods. I like my .222 over 12ga Tikka.
     
  14. trapshootin hippie

    trapshootin hippie Well-Known Member

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    Nothing short of a 50BMG for a 650 yard shot.

    GneJ
     
  15. CalvinMD

    CalvinMD Well-Known Member

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    A big factor of what you plan to shoot them with is whether or not you want to harvest the pelts
     
  16. Diesel Smoke

    Diesel Smoke Active Member

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    Calvin, no I don't plan on saving pelts, we're just trying to manage to deer/coyote population on a few farms.

    Bob Butler, yes it has the old scope on it still. I'm going to have wait for it to warm up some here before I can do much shooting. But I do think I'm going to try a new scope on the old girl. It's still my back-up/loaner rifle for when I take someone new hunting, low recoil, quick follow-up shots if needed.

    I do understand that there are better rifles out there, but I feel that there has to be and end point somewhere. I started off looking at CHEAP guns and building one up to suit my needs. I blew up Google looking for ideas on them, only to see people with similar ideas, and there threads blown up with comments saying stuff like buy (insert next best option rifle here). So I'd do research on that gun, to again see threads with people saying buy (insert next best option here). I've checked out snipershide.com, m4carbine.com, as well as most of the sites on the first 2-3 pages of a google search, and have seen several Remington 700 SPS Tactical AAC-SD's built into good, long range rifles, shooting over twice the distance my farthest shots would be. That's what kind of pointed me in the direction of that rifle.

    But as always, thank you guys for the input I still haven't 100% settled on anything, and will keep looking to see what I can find.

    Smokey
     
  17. Setterman

    Setterman Well-Known Member

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    Another vote for the .243. You can use a 100 gr bullet for deer and drop down to a 55 gr bullet for yotes and varmints. Flat shooting, less recoil, easily reloaded. The new powders and bullets have helped stretched the range and knock down power of the 243.

    My best shooting 243 is an out of the box Remington 700 synthetic.
     
  18. andybull

    andybull Well-Known Member

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    First find out what ammo is available in your area, as it seems rifles are easier to come by than ammo.
    I like .308, .260, .270 WSM, .300 WSM. I have most of the calibers the old folks here have mentioned and they all will drop a coyote, or deer if the bullet finds the right spot.
     
  19. flashmax

    flashmax Well-Known Member

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    Started my son out with a 'sporterized' 03A3 that still had the military mechanical trigger. He learned to shoot that rifle complete with trigger slack, a lot of trigger creep, and a worn to the point of sloppy bolt that caused uneven sear engagement. Then I gave him my M 700 BDL in 6mm remington which by comparison was a tack driver ( 1/2 to 3/4 inch groups at 100 yards. ) But he wanted to shoot an Oryx when he got back from Trash-can-I-stan and liked the performance of the .30-06 round. He spent some saved up combat pay on a Browning White Gold X-bolt in that caliber with a VX-R 4-12x40mm Leupold w/ ballistic fire dot.

    Point is, learn to shoot well with what you have, as hard as that actually is to do, and then when you move to a lot better rifle you will be amazed at how well it shoots. Most rifles out there are capable of shooting MUCH better than the shooter him/herself. The picture3 is of the Oryx, the rifle, and the kid. One shot - one kill.

    Don T
    View attachment 192143
     
  20. wireguy

    wireguy TS Member

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    Great picture. Where?
     
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