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I'll just throw this out there -- I've heard of others who have success with it . . . toothpaste?
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Lots and lots of excellent ideas. I have some Flitz coming tomorrow, I will try the other methods, and I am grateful for the caveat on Naval jelley which I was about to try.
In worst case, I will have bolt jeweled as like some M12 models were done, Hope I dont have to. Before this I will try the extra fine wet & dry paper as I have just found some 1500 grit. Another good point made was the surface finish was not originally a high polish so to match the finish I would have to polish the entire outside of the bolt, which can be done.
I will post my final solution and the results when I have them. Incidently, I prefer restoration like original in all things. The original pad is too long for me so I am replacing it with a replica plain red 1/2" pad with a thin black spacer. I have seen other Winchesters done like this.
Fred G
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Flitz did it!!! And in one easy aplication. Magic!
Non-abrasive so it left the metal texture untouched.
Could not tell the bolt side had ever been touched with anything.
I had several different products lined up ready to try, but waited for the Flitz to arrive because so many had recommended it so highly. I am so glad that I did. When I was in the Army we used a cloth called, "Blitz" which operated very similar. We used it to polish our brass emblems, buckles, etc.
Thanks to everyone who took an interest and had suggestions. Especial thanks to those who insisted on Flitz.
Fred M
 

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I'd just tell people it's a hard-earned accumulation of grease and gunsmoke. It happens to M12s.

The bolts were not chrome plated, as was suggested.

Use some manner of fine polish to work out the stain, as others have suggested. Chemicals (naval jelly, vinegar, etc) should be avoided as they have the annoying habit of leaving behind their own mark, usually a light gray color that could be harder to get rid of than the stain itself. Know that some stains simply will not come out without serious degradation of the surface you are trying to restore.
Use a piece of 600 grit J weight back metal finishing belt. The J weight is very flexible. Rub it with light pressure. Do not go in circles
Rub straight back and forth. If stain is removed the put some Vaseline Grease on belt and Rub into the lines of the previous lines.wipe off and check finish. If not satisfied with finish repeat last operation .

I've been a metal finishe all my working life as a medical device polisher. All stainless types, colbalt, titanium, aluminum and all.
 

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Perazzi TMS/Browning Citori XT
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If they still make it Solvol Autosol...fantastic metal polishing compound and non-abrasive. We used to use it on gun bolts and parts, aluminum wheels on our vehicles and man it would make our tunnels look like chrome back in the day when we rode snowmobiles.
 

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Perazzi TMS/Browning Citori XT
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Here are a couple shots of the jeweling on my carrier and bolt. View attachment 1776618
View attachment 1776619
My Model 12 Y has the same markings from use in the jewelling. My older pre-64's did the same thing as did my new Browning Model 12's once they started being used. It's just part of owning a model 12. That is just normal wear. To the OP I'd suggest you just shoot it and don't sweat it! Either enjoy shooting the best pump gun ever made or leave it unfired in the box if you can't handle wear marks.
 
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