Trapshooters Forum banner

1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just noticed some dark staining on the hinge flange (not sure if that’s the right name for that part). The top half is clean metal colour but the dark can be seen across the lower part. Is that normal, or do I need to clean that up somehow?
1719398
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
There is nothing deep and the markings are like fine surface scratches. All grease was removed for a clearer picture, but the gun has always been well greased . . but has always been tighter than I think it should be. I was thinking of burnishing it lightly with oil and 800 or 1000 emery cloth.
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
19,101 Posts
If it is loose, grease it. If tight use oil.10w-30w functions as well as any specialized gun lubes as well as WBG (Wheel Bearing Grease)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
If it is loose, grease it. If tight use oil.10w-30w functions as well as any specialized gun lubes as well as WBG (Wheel Bearing Grease)
Historically I’ve used marine grease on that spot. It’s typically used for wheel bearings, is water resistant, and heat resistant to 500 degrees F . . but the gun is tight. I think I’ll burnish it very lightly with very fine grit emery paper and oil to see if the colouring will come off without removing any of the metal material . . then try a little 10w-30 or maybe STP (instead of the heavy grease) and see if It feels any looser to open/close.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
It looks like bluing on the receiver ther is nothing touching that spot so the bluing will not were off
That’s an interesting observation. I wouldn’t think that a mating surface like that would be blued, but all the rest of that part is blued so that surface likely was completely blued when new . . and uneven contact/pressure has worn the blueing completely off some areas and not others. I’ll inspect that possibility before doing anything else.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Looked at it from a blueing perspective and it looks like it is definitely blueing. Not sure why I never noticed it before. The scratches are very light and what I think can be considered normal wear marking. The mating knuckles are smooth and clean (see pic). I cleaned it up good and smeared a little 10w-30 on instead of the heavier grease. The open/close action seems less stiff. I think I'm good for now. Thanks for the constructive input folks.

1719542
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,708 Posts
Clean it polish it, and use oil on it.
We used to open the hood of the truck/car when assembling our shotgun, pull the dickstick, and use the engine oil on the hinge components. When it got to where you had to pull a lever inside the cabin and chant abracadabra several times just to find the outside lever to release the hood latch I started using some grasshopper spit as lube. It is an “extreme pressure engine assembly lube” that is like either thick oil or thin STP ( take your pick ).

Some think you must grease the hinge. What they don’t see is that grease squeezes out damn fast but oil, with smaller molecules, stays in place and lubricates longer when applied to surfaces.

Whatta ya know Joe?
 
  • Like
Reactions: BENCHREST

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,037 Posts
I am a firm believer that grease shouldn't be used on any firearm. If you shoot and clean your gun regularly 30 wt non detergent motor oil will work fine and not absorb sand, gun powder or whatever crap that causes galling. Many people and I speak with experience being that I worked as a stockfitter don't replace the grease whenever they clean their gun (too much work, no grease available ) I don't know. What I do know is by using a drop or 2 of oil before I shoot and after I shot wipe everything off, I never had any galling scratches. Just one man's experience. Joe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
489 Posts
Polish it out with Flitz on a Dremel - it will be a whole lot smoother.
Use a felt Dremel tool pad and jewelers rouge or Flitz be careful and not polish on the exposed blued surface. Polish it smooth and then use a good grease when assembling and using it. Wipe it clean and regrease every time you use it. It will break-in and your problem will go away. Then after many many rounds you will be looking for someone to tighten it up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,310 Posts
Use a felt Dremel tool pad and jewelers rouge or Flitz be careful and not polish on the exposed blued surface. Polish it smooth and then use a good grease when assembling and using it. Wipe it clean and regrease every time you use it. It will break-in and your problem will go away. Then after many many rounds you will be looking for someone to tighten it up.
Thank you for going into more detail - I made the assumption someone would not use a sanding disc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
489 Posts
If you had seen as many Jake leg gunsmith jobs as I have you would see why I went into a little detail. There could be some Jake leg that would pick up his right angle grinder and go to work. Yes there is a Ripley's Believe it or Not. Duck keep trucking!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
489 Posts
I am a firm believer that grease shouldn't be used on any firearm. If you shoot and clean your gun regularly 30 wt non detergent motor oil will work fine and not absorb sand, gun powder or whatever crap that causes galling. Many people and I speak with experience being that I worked as a stockfitter don't replace the grease whenever they clean their gun (too much work, no grease available ) I don't know. What I do know is by using a drop or 2 of oil before I shoot and after I shot wipe everything off, I never had any galling scratches. Just one man's experience. Joe
I don't disagree except on the knuckle of the receiver and the forearm iron mating surfaces. Most trapshooting is done during the hot weather months. Grease losses its viscosity and shear resistance at higher temps. Think about the wheel bearing on your auto. Rod and main bearings are continually lubed with somewhat cooled pressurized flow of oil. Just IMHO. And what ever one uses clean it and re-lubricate with clean fresh lube.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
489 Posts
We used to open the hood of the truck/car when assembling our shotgun, pull the dickstick, and use the engine oil on the hinge components. When it got to where you had to pull a lever inside the cabin and chant abracadabra several times just to find the outside lever to release the hood latch I started using some grasshopper spit as lube. It is an “extreme pressure engine assembly lube” that is like either thick oil or thin STP ( take your pick ).

Some think you must grease the hinge. What they don’t see is that grease squeezes out damn fast but oil, with smaller molecules, stays in place and lubricates longer when applied to surfaces.

Whatta ya know Joe?
As your wheel bearing roll does the grease squeeze out and leave the bearings and spindle race unlubricated. I think there is grease remaining that lubes them. Study about Extreme pressure additives used in Grease.
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top