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Hi, I am currently 13 and just started trapshooting last year. A lot of my friends are moving up to 12 gauge shotguns, but many of them have been shooting for 3-4 years. Should I move up now as well, or stay where I am. I have a habit of taking my head off the gun right after pulling the trigger, though I am working on it. I am 5' 7 1/2" and about 95lbs.
 

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Thanks, I'll give it a try. The range that hosts the program I'm doing has ammunition available, which I'm pretty sure is 1 oz, and has a few 1100s to loan out to kids, which is a gun I really liked in 20 ga. My Dad and I are looking into getting me my own shotgun in a couple of months, would the 1100 be a good choice?
 

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Thanks, I'll give it a try. The range that hosts the program I'm doing has ammunition available, which I'm pretty sure is 1 oz, and has a few 1100s to loan out to kids, which is a gun I really liked in 20 ga. My Dad and I are looking into getting me my own shotgun in a couple of months, would the 1100 be a good choice?
You can build 28gauge loads in a 12gauge shell and it's very pleasurable to shoot. Reloading components really hard to find but maybe worth looking into. @joe kuhn has a reloaders for youth program you could learn more about.

Shooting the lightest loads in the heaviest gun you can effectively handle reduces free recoil. Getting a good gun fit helps more and it also helps your scores.

Trap is a 12gauge game. If you can, I'd get a 12 gauge to future proof your purchase.

A gas semiautomatic would be a phenomenal choice. A Remington 1100 is sweet but don't overlook Beretta A303, A391 and A400s. Remington went bankrupt so nobody is 100% about the future of Remington. Berettas have lots of parts and are easy to get. A shell catcher or a knockdown pin is a must for semis. Nobody likes being hit with shells.
 

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Thanks, I'll give it a try. The range that hosts the program I'm doing has ammunition available, which I'm pretty sure is 1 oz, and has a few 1100s to loan out to kids, which is a gun I really liked in 20 ga. My Dad and I are looking into getting me my own shotgun in a couple of months, would the 1100 be a good choice?
I think an 1100 in 12 guage is a great choice. I may have a personal bias, but mine has never let me down. They shoot pretty soft and with a 1 oz #8 at 1200 fps or less load and a minimum of improved modified choke, you should have all you need to shoot respectable scores.

If you do buy one, pick up a spare barrel seal and piston kit and a spare link. That should be all you need in case of a break down. Anything else is unlikely to fail.

Also, don't forget the shell catcher. The wire stick on birchwood casey ones work very well.

There is a very nice sporting 12 for sale on this site in the for sale by participating members forum right now. I won the c class doubles championship at the empire grand last year with that very gun!

As far as trying not to pick your head up, try to pretend as if your going to shoot the target twice. Or keep the head down by following a piece of the broken target with the gun for a second after you shoot, or follow the unfortunately unbroken target with the gun. That's how I taught myself to stay on the stock.

Good luck and have fun!
 

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Cant beat an 1100 for low recoil from an off the shelf gun- go with a 12, just bare in mind it might be a little heavier than the 20 you are used to. I agree with everyone saying to go with the 12, too- get some light loads and you’ll be golden.
 

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HI,

My son just turned 11, he started with a 20G O/U tristar at 10 and I struggled with this same thought. I didn't think he could handle a 12G, well the trap gods decided to show me I was wrong and his 20G broke mid way through the state shoot. We had no other choice but to let him shoot a loaner gun and it was a 12G browning BT-99 34" and he is rocking it, no problems with kick. The gun is darn near as tall as him so i wouldn't say it is fit perfect, but it is working and he has not complained or had any recoil problems. I think you will be fine moving to a 12G, good luck and safe shooting.
 

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OP, I think you need to work with an adult shooter to help you develop. Some of the other posters have mentioned, correctly, that low recoil, lower velocity shells will allow you to shoot the 12g comfortably. But, I fear they did not read your post. Thirteen years old, 5'7" and 95lbs. You're growing, but knowing kids in my own family, I don't think you're going to be able to shoot an 8 or 9lb 12g for very long on a saturday afternoon. The mechanics of trying to heave that gun to your shoulder are whats worrying me.

Not to mention there are no low recoil shells available to buy at this time.

Do a search on this forum for new/starting shooters and you'll see lots of information that may help you. I'd be in no rush to get into a 12g. I'm assuming you're shooting from 16yd line, hand traps, maybe some sporting clays with your buddies. At your age and size, I'd be focusing on lowest recoil possible so that you dont begin to develop bad habits. Think 28ga Remington 1100 or other auto loader. If you cant find 28ga or money is tight, then move to 20ga, same guns. Very last would be 12ga. Good luck.
 

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I started my son an daughter off with a 28 gauge Remington 1100 at ages 9 and 12. They both switched to a 12 gauge after about 18 months.
My son is 13, 5-3” and about 95 lbs. He’s been shooting a BT-99 for two years with no issues. He has several 25’s under his belt already.
My daughter is 20, 5-6 and 95 lbs. She shoots a Remington 1100 12 gauge and tears them up. At age 18 she put a 195 on the board at the Grand.

I think you are more than ready for a 12 gauge. Just make sure the gun fits.
 

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I started my son an daughter off with a 28 gauge Remington 1100 at ages 9 and 12. They both switched to a 12 gauge after about 18 months.
My son is 13, 5-3” and about 95 lbs. He’s been shooting a BT-99 for two years with no issues. He has several 25’s under his belt already.
My daughter is 20, 5-6 and 95 lbs. She shoots a Remington 1100 12 gauge and tears them up. At age 18 she put a 195 on the board at the Grand.

I think you are more than ready for a 12 gauge. Just make sure the gun fits.
I really hope that's a typo. A 20 year old woman 5'6" 95 lbs???
 

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When I was young my father moved me to a 12 ga pretty quickly after a short time with a 20ga. He provided light loads for a year or so and I did okay with that. Later on I got an 1100 and moved on to regular loads.
I was a very tall girl for my age group though, so stocks didn't need to be altered fro length.
Best wishes.
 

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When my son started I took the advice given here, stuck with 12ga and looked for Rem 1100 or other soft shooting auto. Went to a gun show and after shouldering a few models we found a beretta 302 and right around the corner from that booth we found a 303 so we bought both. Both have been fantastic to shoot and very reliable. They are light so he could handle it well but has little felt recoil. Best purchase ever, and some good advice from here too
 
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