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Discussion Starter #1
Hello:
What factors determine if you shoot a gun with a Monte Carlo or a straight stock?
I believe that I saw more shooters using straight trap stocks years ago than today.

When I first started shooting in 1970, I often heard that if you had a long neck you shot with a Monte Carlo stock. If you had little to no neck you should shoot a trap straight stock.

I have a size 56" chest, long arms, 36" sleeve, 22" neck, fellow shooters say I have no neck and I should shoot with a straight stock. I have always used a Monte Carlo stock as it feels more comfortable to me.

So my question is, does shooting with a straight stock have it's benefits if you have little to no neck? Should a shooter with virtually no neck ever use a Monte Carlo stock?
Steve Balistreri
Wauwatosa Wisconsin
 

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Today, there is no difference in comb height between the two stock designs in production stocks. As Country Blues said, the Monte Carlo design actually lowers the recoil pad instead of raising the comb, so it still works better for long-necked shooters. Compare the drop at the comb of a brand of stock made in both designs and you'll see they are the same. Their drop at the heel will be very different, however. Given their commonality, Remington stocks are a good brand on which to check this.

I actually have a Remington trap stock with a straight comb that is higher than my Remington Monte Carlo stocks for the same model of gun. The old 870 Competition's comb is higher than the Monte Carlo combs on my 870TCs as long-yardage handicap was one of the Competition's intended uses.

Ed
 

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The original idea

Feb. 11, 1893 "Sporting Life"

MODIFIED GUN STOCK. "Something New From England Which Isn't Popular"

A representative English gun firm recently devised a new gun stock which is quite a novelty, but not likely to find favor with many sportsmen. The firm terms the new stock a "modified stock." This stock, while retaining the extreme drop at the butt, has a parallel bend along the face line from the comb to five or six inches back, giving the same alignment at any point between these limits, subject in some cases to slight modifications.

It is generally conceded that shooting is greatly improved when the stock fits easily against the face at the moment of sighting. This cannot always be obtained when the drop of the stock continuously increases from the comb to the extreme butt. As most guns used by American sportsmen have a bend of one and three-fourths inches at comb to three inches or more at butt, there is an increasing slope of about one-fourth-inch between these points. It follows that in shooting a high-flying bird the face presses against the stock nearer the comb than when aiming at a low-flying bird or ground game; therefore, according to the flight, high or low, so the sight is taken at various distances from the comb and practically increasing or diminishing the bend of the gun at each shot.

English and continental sportsmen for years have used stocks parallel from comb to butt, but the extreme drop of guns which has prevailed with American sportsmen, although there is now a tendency to use straight stocks, has interfered with, the attainment of that desideratum - easy and accurate shooting.

From "Pigeon Shooting" by A. W. 'Bluerock' Money, 1896

 

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Reinhart Fajen said the top of the recoil pad should be at the top of your shoulder.

Not hard to figure after that.

HM
 

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Remington trap stocks for 870/1100/1187 come in straight comb and monte carlo.

Both have the same comb height.

The only difference is the drop.

This means both stocks shoot to the same POI for the same shooter, but one or the other fits the shoulder better.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Drew:
Thanks for posting that, interesting.
Steve

Halfmile:
I have always believed that too.
Steve

I am starting to think it makes no difference what type of stock one uses as long as it fits you.
Steve
 
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