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I know that all of us here have a pet load that we swear by. I know that there are burn rates and cost considerations of each brand of powder. I have not seen much of a percentage change at the pattern board or target performance. Using different powders with the same wad has given me near similar results.
I am not sure if it is the quality of my barrel or it just is indeterminate.
Similar shot speed with the same wad and different powder shoots the same.
The things that have shown change for me
Some do not perform well in winter and sound like bad loads.
Dirty, cost, and final product appearance after loading are also some of my considerations of choice.

What is your take?
 

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For me, the big differences in powders is density, which has an impact on how the final product looks. Depending on the wad and hull, a more dense or more bulky powder will be called for, particularly if one is loading AAHS hulls like I do. Those hulls are much more sensitive to stack height than most other hulls. Usually, depending on the powder I'm using, I'll have to use a different wad in order to move the stack height up or down so I get good crimps. It's all sort of a balancing act.
 

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+1 for powder density changes. in many cases, in the same hull if you change powders you will need to change wads to make up for stack height. sometimes its just a change in wad column height, sometimes it could result in having to use a different design of wad. a wad design change may or may not impact your pattern. one thing that needs to be accounted for with different powders is chamber pressure. that primarily comes into play with gas operated autoloaders. for example, a gun that cycles correctly on a powder that generates 10000 psi may not cycle correctly with a powder that generates 8000 psi or less.
 

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^^To add to the chamber pressure comment, lower chamber pressures often contribute to barrel residue. Boosting the chamber pressure to ~10K psi will reduce the amount of residue, giving a cleaner burn. You can increase chamber pressure by going to a faster powder; slower powders usually give lower chamber pressures, ceteris paribus.
 
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