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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I often use Claybuster Wads and I get very little plastic fouling in my ported barrels. Others seem to get a lot using the same components that I use. High pressure is not the reason because the plastic deposits are usually near the end of the barrel where the pressure has gone down. Is there a lot of difference in the interior finish of barrels? Could polishing a barrel reduce fouling? Why do some have a problem and others do not?

Pat Ireland
 

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I don't know either Pat. I have Invector plus skeet chokes that pick up plastic to a small degree with my ported barrels on my 425 and my old fixed full choke 1100 that I use for trapshooting collects none. I use the same wads as you in both guns as well as the same powders.
 

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My guess is that it is friction and heat. A little plastic melts off as the wad goes down the barrel. I think I get less fouling, when I keep a thin coat of oil on the inside of the barrel. Billy
 

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I think the finish does influence plastic build up. Before having barrel work done to one of my trap guns, it collected some plastic (not excessive). Now it collects almost none. Backboreing and lengthening the forcing cone more than likely contributed to less friction also. I would think the smoother the bore finish, the less friction there would be on the surface of the wad contacting the barrel keeping the wad cooler. A wad with the surface temperature near melting point would almost certainly leave heavy plastic deposits in the machine marks in the choke. Velocity would also effect heat. Just my thoughts! Mike
 

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I could be wrong but My take on the plastic in some barrels may be caused by choke tubes that don`t fit properly and when tightened have a cutting edge affect on the wad , shredding it as it travels through the choke . Unfortunately the picture on another thread doesn`t show a choke tube or I can`t see one ?? I use only Claybusters and have a lot of guns and never had anything like whats shown nor do I have any build-up of any kind in my guns .
 

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The plastic build up is the result of heat caused by friction. The shot charge forces the wad petals against the bore, the rougher the surface the greater the deposit. HMB
 

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I'm surely not the one to give scientific reasoning to the buildup of plastic. That being said, I used to use Claybuster wads in 2 of my Model 12's and my Beretta 682. (No choke tubes and no porting). I had strings of plastic that I removed from the barrels. I then switched to Remington Figure 8 wads and never had the problem again. I have successfully used AA wads and within the last couple of years I switched to DownRange wads. No problems. Again, I'm no rocket scientist; but I have to believe it was the makeup of the Claybuster wads that caused it. I haven't used Claybuster wads in approximately 7 or 8 years. Don't plan on it either, for that very reason. Ed
 

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this is a good post. on my trap gun I only get plastic build up in my choke tubes. not the barrel. weather I use extended chokes or flush chokes. I use figure 8 wads. I will be changing to blue duster wads but I have 1,000 loaded to use up. if this makes a difference I dont know. I use 700 x powder, and federal primers with 1 1/8 oz. loads with a rem. fig. 8 wad
 

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Well, there's a hornets' nest for you.

Logic would seem to indicate it's primarily an issue of the plastic formulation, and secondarily the bore finish.

Some wads leave reminders of themselves, others don't. My own experience with Claybusters has been that they leave stuff in the barrel - at least any barrel I own, and some of them are so polished that spiders can't walk the length of them without falling down a couple of times. I get nearly as much plastic shread in front of the chamber as I do in the chokes.

Could be the barrel or choke tubes. I have a set of Briley tubes that pull plastic off any wad that's made, but then the Brileys come with all those little ridges, so maybe the plastic shrap is just a given. My few brushes with chrome-lined barrels is that they shoot pretty clean and are easy to clean afterwards, so that speaks to surface finish.

Wouldn't think it would be the powder since the wad is ahead of all the heat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Heat seems like a logical answer, but I am not sure it is a correct answer. For heat to melt the plastic, the plastic must be exposed to a heat source long enough to raise the temperature of the plastic. The wad remains in the barrel for less than 1/400 of a second. I flicked a wad across the red hot burners of my cooking range. The burners were much hotter than a barrel and my quick flick of the wad over the burner was longer than 1/400 of a second. The wad was a Claybuster and it showed no indication of melting. Then, just for fun I rather slowly passed the wad and my finger over a cigarette lighter. The wad did not melt and my finger did not burn.

Pat Ireland
 

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What about the tremendous amount of pressure from the shot being forced through the constriction of a choke. The pellets are still inside the shot cup and pressing the plastic against the choke tube or barrel. As pressure increases so does heat. I wonder if skeet tubes have less plastic build up because of less constriction. Wayne
 

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flame temperature associated with the powder burn rate and the degree of the load pressure.

Is there less plastic with lighter shot and powder charges?

Unique seems to have a higher flame temperature fro example that 700x
 
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I've never got a large buildup in the choke area with claybusters,
but do get buildup about 2-8 " down the bore from the chamber.
If you've ever looked at most claybuster wads,in the center of the basewad, there's a sprue where the plastic injection mold inserts the molten plastic.
The sprue is very pronounced,moreso than most other type wads,also,you'll often notice while loading claybusters, these spider web like plastic strings hanging off the sprue.Claybuster doesn't do any sort of tumbling process, or anything the get rid of this.It's the protruding sprue and spiderweb like strings at the bottom of the basewad that melt upon ignition, and smear the bore with plastic.
I also feel their plastic composition is to blame.
BTW: a mirror smooth bore will have more friction than a rougher bore.
 

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Years ago I bought some CB wads for a bargain price that were manufactured with wrong mixture of plastic and those were just fine and again , no plastic build-up in my barrels ??? Don`t knock the Claybusters !!!! Maybe my guns are better than your guns .
 

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I used to use the WT-12 Orange wads, but have switched to Fig8, much less deposit! Too bad cause the WT12 shot fine and were (are) cheaper
 

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Years ago, before I polished the barrel on my TM-1, I had flags of plastic flying from the muzzle end of my gun! Now I can shoot most any of the cheaper wads without any plastic build-up! Ask a few MachOne owners if they ever have plastic build-up in their guns? Smoothest barrel internals to be had.

Hap
 
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