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Vic

Those model 31 Remingtons pointed like nuthin' else.

If Vic showed up at one of today's big shoots, and saw an 18 yard line packed with "MEN" toting fancy K-80s, Ljutic's, Kolar max's, and MX whatever . . . . all custom stocked . . . .in high grade marble cake . . . . he'd quit and never come back.

GAP
 

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Back about late '70s, early '80s, Vic sponsored a trap shooting for beginners group every summer. Held at the Waukesha Gun club and alternately at Boxhorns. Very popular and upwards of 100 new shooters every year. Vic, Dick Bennett (Trapshooting is a game of Opposites), the late Frank Hoppe, and the late Jack Gracey all teamed up to teach trap to newcomers. It was very successful and helped grow the sport in that region, at that time.
 

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Vic tried to drive purses out of trapshooting. He was passionate about trapshooting and loved it but he alienated a lot of shooters, even from his own state.

He did a lot of good for trapshooting but wasn't a saint either.
 

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Barry, why do you say that he tried to drive purses out of trapshooting? I did not personally know Vic, but shooting in Wisconsin for the last 45 years or so I have some experience shooting when Vic was the WTA president. The added money was twice as much in the 70's as it it now and we had a compulsory purse in the state handicap championship, which was outlawed by the ATA. He was fair with the money distribution, money payouts went to more shooters and were larger than today's payouts. Over half of the shooters played the purse, 50's, and 25's back then. That doesn't sound like he tried to drive purses out.

Going back to the original question. I think that Vic would not have allowed the gap between the top handicap shooters and the average shooter's average to become as wide as it is today. It's kind of like allowing AA singles shooters to compete in the same class as B shooters. (Right Neil?) Maybe I am wrong, that's just the way I see it.

Bob K.
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Because it's true. He "ruled" the WTA at Waukesha for years and didn't like purses. WTA added money was only for the WTA members, which was and is appropriate.

Barry C. Roach 17 50780
 

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Vic Reinder's was a personal friend of mine. Like previously stated above, he was the president of the ATA in 1958. He is credited with rewriting the entire ATA rule book. Obviously, what I will be expressing today will be my opinions on how Vic might make changes in today's world of trapshooting.

Vic felt that every man put his pants on one leg at a time, and he would have had a fit seeing any yardages set for a male adult in good health less than 20 yards. Vic would also have gone back to 3 hole targets. Vic was totally against having bars in gun clubs. Most likely, Sporting clays and 5 stand would not be offered at most clubs that he might be associated with.

He tried his hardest to keep the cost of trapshooting as low as possible, mainly so the average working man could stay in the sport and still shoot tournament targets. He felt if the cost of shot ever exceeded $10.00 a bag, shooters would leave the sport in droves.

This is the reason he was always testing and looking for a replacement for lead as he could foresee lead some day rising in price. He strongly believed that the success of trapshooting laid in the hands of the average working mans participation in our sport. He felt with the advent of reloading, the average man could partake in trapshooting and do it well.

Vic NEVER, beat around the bush, he told you point blank how he felt and what his opinion was on any subject if you liked it or not. This is why most people did not like Vic. It was Vic's way or the highway. You never had any doubt of who was in charge and how Vic felt on any subject.

In Vic's younger more competitive days he traveled by car, train, plane, and boat to get to a shoot and hopefully win some money. Trapshooting and hunting was his life.

In his later years, he was strongly against Calcutta's (money shoots) as he felt it only attracted chiselers in our sport, (his words, not mine). If someone shot a high handicap score at a non registered shoot he would call in to the ATA and attempt to increase the individual's assigned handicap yardage.

He lived and ate Trapshooting and the ATA. He always fought against the anti gunners. Someone asked the type of car he drove. First year I met Vic he drove up to the old Milwaukee gun club in a green Rambler. There was a sigh among some of the competitors as they knew Vic had a very good chance to win that day's events. Trust me, if you beat Vic in a shoot off, you beat the best.

He purchased his famous Remington 31 TC shotgun from a Remington rep by the name of Harry Dunham at the Milwaukee gun club for $50.00. It had a 28inch barrel on it and was .045 in constriction. In later years he had a bulge near the choke caused by a stuck wad. The forend was broken and never repaired as he felt "it never effected the way the gun shot".

Vic never owned his own home, as most of his money was shot over trap fields. He was a chemistry professor at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee campus. He married his wife Tommy who was a physical education teacher and a trapshooter.

Vic had so much faith in his ability to shoot that one year his teaching salary was $3,000.00 and he went to most out of state tournaments with just enough money to shoot and eat. He had to win to either take a train or bus back home.

One year a sound A shooter with deep pockets offered a challenge to anyone in the Ata to shoot against him with a $1,000.00 entry, 1/3 of his yearly salary. Vic entered as well as one other all American shooter and over 1,000 targets Vic won beating the other All American by 2 targets and the class A shooter by 8 targets. Vic never doubted that he would win.

I hope this answers some questions about who Vic Reinder's was. Many people did not like Vic, but the sport of trapshooting owes this man a debt of gratitude for all he did for the sport. Like him or not, he was one of the best shooters in the world at one time and attempted to promote our great sport.
Steve Balistreri
Wauwatosa Wisconsin
 

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He was on my skeet squad one year at Faskell's. Shot the same full choke release trigger model 31.

Doubles:

Click - Bang - Shuck - CLick - Bang, and 2 smokeballs hanging in the air.

I'll never forget Vic, and his crusty ways.

HM
 

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He was on my skeet squad one year at Faskell's. Shot the same full choke release trigger model 31.

Doubles:

Click - Bang - Shuck - CLick - Bang, and 2 smokeballs hanging in the air.

I'll never forget Vic, and his crusty ways.

HM
 

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My 1954 average book shows a picture of Vic and his wife. Vic was 4th high doubles average and his wife 3rd.in Ladies in Wisconsin in 1954. Not bad for a pump gun. I had the honor of squading with Vic a couple times in the 1970's & 80's at the Grand. Always shooting that trusty M31. His name is shown many times in the 1954 average book.

Clyde Doll
 

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My 1954 average book shows a picture of Vic and his wife. Vic was 4th high doubles average and his wife 3rd.in Ladies in Wisconsin in 1954. Not bad for a pump gun. I had the honor of squading with Vic a couple times in the 1970's & 80's at the Grand. Always shooting that trusty M31. His name is shown many times in the 1954 average book.

Clyde Doll
 

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Herb:
I think that is the same Dick Bennett. He worked with Duane Buchholz. Dick is still living last I heard in Wisconsin. Duane Buchholz passed away in 2008. They were long time friends, and when Dick and Duane worked together it was Duane who got Dick interested in the sport of Trapshooting.
Steve
 

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Herb:
I think that is the same Dick Bennett. He worked with Duane Buchholz. Dick is still living last I heard in Wisconsin. Duane Buchholz passed away in 2008. They were long time friends, and when Dick and Duane worked together it was Duane who got Dick interested in the sport of Trapshooting.
Steve
 
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