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UPS Delivery Today...my new Spolar!

3464 Views 38 Replies 23 Participants Last post by  Trooper25
Arrived home today to see my new Spolar and hydraulic unit sitting on my front porch! Like a kid in a candy store I unpacked, mounted and assembled. No hydraulic fluid for the pump so have to go get that, but she is ready to rock manually. Which I plan to load a few hundred without the hydraulic anyway to learn the machine. I have been loading for several years on an RCBS Grand. Probably will put her up for sale once I get the hang of the new toy.

If any of you went from the Grand to a Spolar, is there anything I should watch out for while running? I assume the non case activated powder and shot dispensing is a learning curve.
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Maybe a couple thousand to get the feel of the machine... Your call of course. I am assuming this is a 12 gauge. 12 gauge is super easy on the machine. Make sure the dies are lubed as they recommend. Get in the habit of always and I mean always watching the primer drop. One flaw in the machine is if you miss the primer and drop the powder it can drop the powder into primer the track. You may need to remove all of the primers and clean the track. My area is a tad dark and I keep a small light shined on the primer cup so I can see that the primer is in the proper location on the down stroke. I also keep some primers handy and some long needle nose pliers.

On the back left side of the machine there is a lever and it will allow you to raise or lower the machine without advancing the shells. This can help you.

Try using 7.5 shot at first. If you spill shot, 7.5 is big enough that it does not get caught in the machine.

Good luck and this thread is almost useless without pictures (j.k).
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Maybe a couple thousand to get the feel of the machine... Your call of course. I am assuming this is a 12 gauge. 12 gauge is super easy on the machine. Make sure the dies are lubed as they recommend. Get in the habit of always and I mean always watching the primer drop. One flaw in the machine is if you miss the primer and drop the powder it can drop the powder into primer the track. You may need to remove all of the primers and clean the track. My area is a tad dark and I keep a small light shined on the primer cup so I can see that the primer is in the proper location on the down stroke. I also keep some primers handy and some long needle nose pliers.

On the back left side of the machine there is a lever and it will allow you to raise or lower the machine without advancing the shells. This can help you.

Try using 7.5 shot at first. If you spill shot, 7.5 is big enough that it does not get caught in the machine.

Good luck and this thread is almost useless without pictures (j.k).
Yes, 12 gauge and 7.5 shot. Thanks for the pointers
 

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I have 2 MEC 9000's in 12 ga. and one of Ben's first automates before he sold the design to MEC which became the 9000E. Bought the second 12 ga. MEC basically for spare parts for the one attached to the automate. At the time my son and I were shooting ~20K shells a year and lead was $9.99 a bag.

I have MEC 9000's in 16 and 20 ga. also but never hooked them up to the automate. Ben did tell me he didn't believe in reinventing the wheel and what part numbers I needed from MEC to adapt them but I never have. Actually he said he was lazy and didn't believe in reinventing the wheel.

Never stopped reloading for the 16 ga. but with lead prices going up for the 12 and 20 ammo on sale it didn't make sense to keep reloading them for quite a few years now. With the shortage of ammo over the last year I've been cranking out what I need once again.

I am not jealous of a Spolar. Well... OK I lied. If I had it to do over again I'd go Gold all the way. You choose wisely from my experience. Congrats! You are eating some high end candy at the store now :)
 

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You will put shot and powder on the bench. Loaded thousands of rounds on the 9000's and they take care of starting and stopping the powder and shot but it is your job to turn the shot and powder on and off. That was a learning curve moment for me. I also had Rudy from Creative Reloading Solutions make one of his primer punches for the Spolar. I was having trouble with the powder drop tube catching the edge of a hull that wasn't nearly perfect. If the hull wasn't almost completely opened it caught. If you don't see that then it will also put shot on your machine and the wad ends up cocked at the same time. Sounds like the older machines had a punch that helped with that but the newer machines all use a punch designed for the 410.

Short of that these machines put out some really nice ammo. The cycle time is noticeably faster using the hydros than the Mec automate would run the 9000. It is a very good plan to use it without the hydros as you are planning on doing. Things happen fast but do work well.
 

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I'm on the waiting list right now. No hydraulics right away for me, but perhaps I'll change my mind while I'm waiting. Last I heard I should be happy by October.

Buy once, cry once. I look at it as something that will last me the remainder of my time on Earth.
Once you go hydraulic, you won't go without it
 
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