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When I was in eighth grade (1972) I read a trapshooting story about a company trapshooter. (Remington I think). Who was shooting at a range when a young man drove up in a old pickup truck. After watching a few rounds he told the pro I believe I could hit them with my .22 rifle. The Pro told him if u want to try it I will pay for your round. The young man got his rifle. He missed his first 4 shots on station 1. Then he hit one. Then he proceeded to hit 18 out of the next 20. Then said Thank you and got in his truck and left. I thought this was a Remington book but can’t find it. Was wondering if anybody else remembered this story or could tell me what book this was. Thanks Bob
 

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The quote came from Dick Baldwin's book, "The Road to Yesterday", published in 2005. From his story about 'A Killdeer and the Greatest Ever?'

From the book, page 138:
The actual event happened to the Remington Pro, Clyde Mitchell in South Dakota when he was giving a shooting exhibition. The traps were set up in a rather rustic area, hidden behind bales of straw; not a regular trap layout. He had just broken 95x100 when a young rancher drove up in an old touring car. The rancher watched the last squad shoot, got out of his car and walked up to Clyde and said, "I didn't know you used shotguns. Makes it pretty easy, doesn't it?"

Clyde said, "Of course we use shotguns. What do you want us to do, hit 'em with a rifle?" "Well," said the rancher, "I think I could. I can hit prairie chickens flying."
This burned Clyde a bit and he replied, "Well, if you'd like to try, son, I'll buy the targets."

Using a single shot .22 rifle from the 16 yard line:
As Clyde related the story: "He missed the first two targets from position 1, and then I'll be damned if he didn't break the next three. When he got to post 2, he missed one and broke the other four. I guess he finally hit about two-thirds of the targets, but nobody thought to keep score. When it was all over he came back and thanked me, got in his old car and drove out across the prairie. We just kind of stood there and never thought to ask his name. Nobody ever saw or heard of him again."

Scott Hanes
 

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The quote came from Dick Baldwin's book, "The Road to Yesterday", published in 2005. From his story about 'A Killdeer and the Greatest Ever?'

From the book, page 138:
The actual event happened to the Remington Pro, Clyde Mitchell in South Dakota when he was giving a shooting exhibition. The traps were set up in a rather rustic area, hidden behind bales of straw; not a regular trap layout. He had just broken 95x100 when a young rancher drove up in an old touring car. The rancher watched the last squad shoot, got out of his car and walked up to Clyde and said, "I didn't know you used shotguns. Makes it pretty easy, doesn't it?"

Clyde said, "Of course we use shotguns. What do you want us to do, hit 'em with a rifle?" "Well," said the rancher, "I think I could. I can hit prairie chickens flying."
This burned Clyde a bit and he replied, "Well, if you'd like to try, son, I'll buy the targets."

Using a single shot .22 rifle from the 16 yard line:
As Clyde related the story: "He missed the first two targets from position 1, and then I'll be damned if he didn't break the next three. When he got to post 2, he missed one and broke the other four. I guess he finally hit about two-thirds of the targets, but nobody thought to keep score. When it was all over he came back and thanked me, got in his old car and drove out across the prairie. We just kind of stood there and never thought to ask his name. Nobody ever saw or heard of him again."

Scott Hanes
His name was probably "Hank" :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The quote came from Dick Baldwin's book, "The Road to Yesterday", published in 2005. From his story about 'A Killdeer and the Greatest Ever?'

From the book, page 138:
The actual event happened to the Remington Pro, Clyde Mitchell in South Dakota when he was giving a shooting exhibition. The traps were set up in a rather rustic area, hidden behind bales of straw; not a regular trap layout. He had just broken 95x100 when a young rancher drove up in an old touring car. The rancher watched the last squad shoot, got out of his car and walked up to Clyde and said, "I didn't know you used shotguns. Makes it pretty easy, doesn't it?"

Clyde said, "Of course we use shotguns. What do you want us to do, hit 'em with a rifle?" "Well," said the rancher, "I think I could. I can hit prairie chickens flying."
This burned Clyde a bit and he replied, "Well, if you'd like to try, son, I'll buy the targets."

Using a single shot .22 rifle from the 16 yard line:
As Clyde related the story: "He missed the first two targets from position 1, and then I'll be damned if he didn't break the next three. When he got to post 2, he missed one and broke the other four. I guess he finally hit about two-thirds of the targets, but nobody thought to keep score. When it was all over he came back and thanked me, got in his old car and drove out across the prairie. We just kind of stood there and never thought to ask his name. Nobody ever saw or heard of him again."

Scott Hanes
Thank you.
The quote came from Dick Baldwin's book, "The Road to Yesterday", published in 2005. From his story about 'A Killdeer and the Greatest Ever?'

From the book, page 138:
The actual event happened to the Remington Pro, Clyde Mitchell in South Dakota when he was giving a shooting exhibition. The traps were set up in a rather rustic area, hidden behind bales of straw; not a regular trap layout. He had just broken 95x100 when a young rancher drove up in an old touring car. The rancher watched the last squad shoot, got out of his car and walked up to Clyde and said, "I didn't know you used shotguns. Makes it pretty easy, doesn't it?"

Clyde said, "Of course we use shotguns. What do you want us to do, hit 'em with a rifle?" "Well," said the rancher, "I think I could. I can hit prairie chickens flying."
This burned Clyde a bit and he replied, "Well, if you'd like to try, son, I'll buy the targets."

Using a single shot .22 rifle from the 16 yard line:
As Clyde related the story: "He missed the first two targets from position 1, and then I'll be damned if he didn't break the next three. When he got to post 2, he missed one and broke the other four. I guess he finally hit about two-thirds of the targets, but nobody thought to keep score. When it was all over he came back and thanked me, got in his old car and drove out across the prairie. We just kind of stood there and never thought to ask his name. Nobody ever saw or heard of him again."

Scott Hanes
That is what I was looking for. Thanks.
The quote came from Dick Baldwin's book, "The Road to Yesterday", published in 2005. From his story about 'A Killdeer and the Greatest Ever?'

From the book, page 138:
The actual event happened to the Remington Pro, Clyde Mitchell in South Dakota when he was giving a shooting exhibition. The traps were set up in a rather rustic area, hidden behind bales of straw; not a regular trap layout. He had just broken 95x100 when a young rancher drove up in an old touring car. The rancher watched the last squad shoot, got out of his car and walked up to Clyde and said, "I didn't know you used shotguns. Makes it pretty easy, doesn't it?"

Clyde said, "Of course we use shotguns. What do you want us to do, hit 'em with a rifle?" "Well," said the rancher, "I think I could. I can hit prairie chickens flying."
This burned Clyde a bit and he replied, "Well, if you'd like to try, son, I'll buy the targets."

Using a single shot .22 rifle from the 16 yard line:
As Clyde related the story: "He missed the first two targets from position 1, and then I'll be damned if he didn't break the next three. When he got to post 2, he missed one and broke the other four. I guess he finally hit about two-thirds of the targets, but nobody thought to keep score. When it was all over he came back and thanked me, got in his old car and drove out across the prairie. We just kind of stood there and never thought to ask his name. Nobody ever saw or heard of him again."

Scott Hanes
Thanks this was just what I was looking for.
 

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Awesome book with tons of great stories. I had thought that one autographed by a lot of todays super shooters would make a great trophy for the Grand or something along those lines.
 

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Used to shoot at a club that had an event at turkey shoots where they would set the trap on straight away and from post 3 with a shared Marlin 39a 2 or 3 hits out of 10 were made once in a while.
 

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I too remember reading that at one time, but it was quite awhile ago. I’ve always wondered where I DID read that snippet, actually and now I know where it came from originally. I know it had to read it over 35 plus years ago and I’m sure it was a short story quote in Outdoor Life, Field and Stream, Fur Fish and Game, or another monthly periodical that I’d devour as soon as I’d get home from school. If I had the actual book I would or re-read it in my youth.
 

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I used to do a demonstration at the Boy Scout camp where I would hit clay pigeons off a hand thrower with a .22 Rifle and then a .45 1911. I had pretty good success once I figured out the trick.
 
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