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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a true smith and Wesson victory model 38 special. all numbers match and in 95-98 %.very rare to have the compleat package shoulder holster and ammo pouch with military brass ranking bars on ammo pouch. bombing division in i942.has all the markings from wwII. this one is not an loan and lease pistol.
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Nice. My dad carried a privately purchased Victory Model in a shoulder holster during the Korean War. Alas, it was stolen during his return home on his troop ship.

I had one back in the 1990s. Probably shudda kept it, but traded it off.

This page has info on the markings, finish, etc.

The Victory model Smith and Wesson

So the question is, what is your asking price?
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
YES IT IS FOR SALE AND YES THIS IS A TRUE 38 SPECIAL. THE LOAN AND LEASE WERE 38 S&W THE ONE'S THAT WERE USED BY THE BOMBERS WERE 38 SPECIALS. THIS ONE IS ALL ORIGINAL UN TOUCHED. $ 1,200 BUCKS TAKES IT
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Nice. My dad carried a privately purchased Victory Model in a shoulder holster during the Korean War. Alas, it was stolen during his return home on his troop ship.

I had one back in the 1990s. Probably shudda kept it, but traded it off.

This page has info on the markings, finish, etc.

The Victory model Smith and Wesson

So the question is, what is your asking price?
$ 1,200 BUCKS WILL BUY IT VERY NICE PART OF HISTORY.
 

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They were 38 S&W (not Special) unless they have been modified. I have one that has been so modified and is no where as nice as yours.
Victory Model
The S&W Model 10 military revolvers produced from 1942 to 1944 had serial numbers with a "V" prefix, and were known as the Smith & Wesson Victory Model. It is noteworthy that early Victory Models did not always have the V prefix. During World War II over 570,000 of these pistols were supplied to the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa under the Lend-Lease program, chambered in the British .38/200 caliber already in use in the Enfield No 2 Mk I Revolver and the Webley Mk IV Revolver. Most Victory Models sent to Britain were fitted with 4" (102 mm) or 5" (127 mm) barrels, although a few early versions had 6" (150 mm) barrels.[5][6] In general, most British and Commonwealth forces expressed a preference for the .38/200 Smith & Wesson over their standard Enfield revolver.[7]

The Victory Model was used by United States forces during World War II, being chambered in the well-known and popular .38 Special cartridge. The Victory Model was a standard-issue sidearm for US Navy and Marine aircrews, and was also used by security guards at factories and defense installations throughout the United States during the war.[8]

Some of these revolvers remained in service well into the 1990s with units of the US Armed Forces, including the Coast Guard. Until the introduction of the Beretta M9 9mm pistol in 1990, U.S. Army helicopter crew members and female Military Police officers were equipped with .38 caliber Victory Model revolvers. Criminal Investigation Division agents were issued .38 caliber revolvers with two inch barrels. The Victory Model remained in use with Air National Guard tanker and transport crews as late as Operation Desert Storm in 1991.[9]

Some Lend-Lease Victory Model revolvers originally chambered for the British .38/200 were returned to the U.S. and rechambered to fire the more popular and more powerful .38 Special ammunition, and such revolvers are usually so marked on their barrels. Rechambering of .38-200 cylinders to .38 Special results in oversized chambers which may cause problems. Lee Harvey Oswald was carrying a re-chambered Victory Model when he was apprehended on November 22, 1963.[10]

The finish on Victory Models was typically a sandblasted and parkerized finish, which is noticeably different from the higher-quality blue or nickel/chrome finishes usually found on commercial M&P/Model 10 revolvers. Other distinguishing features of the Victory Model revolver are the lanyard loop at the bottom of the grip frame, and the use of smooth (rather than checkered) walnut grip panels. However some early models did use a checkered grip, most notably the pre-1942 manufacture.[11]

Smith & Wesson Model 10 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Victory Model
The S&W Model 10 military revolvers produced from 1942 to 1944 had serial numbers with a "V" prefix, and were known as the Smith & Wesson Victory Model. It is noteworthy that early Victory Models did not always have the V prefix. During World War II over 570,000 of these pistols were supplied to the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa under the Lend-Lease program, chambered in the British .38/200 caliber already in use in the Enfield No 2 Mk I Revolver and the Webley Mk IV Revolver. Most Victory Models sent to Britain were fitted with 4" (102 mm) or 5" (127 mm) barrels, although a few early versions had 6" (150 mm) barrels.[5][6] In general, most British and Commonwealth forces expressed a preference for the .38/200 Smith & Wesson over their standard Enfield revolver.[7]

The Victory Model was used by United States forces during World War II, being chambered in the well-known and popular .38 Special cartridge. The Victory Model was a standard-issue sidearm for US Navy and Marine aircrews, and was also used by security guards at factories and defense installations throughout the United States during the war.[8]

Some of these revolvers remained in service well into the 1990s with units of the US Armed Forces, including the Coast Guard. Until the introduction of the Beretta M9 9mm pistol in 1990, U.S. Army helicopter crew members and female Military Police officers were equipped with .38 caliber Victory Model revolvers. Criminal Investigation Division agents were issued .38 caliber revolvers with two inch barrels. The Victory Model remained in use with Air National Guard tanker and transport crews as late as Operation Desert Storm in 1991.[9]

Some Lend-Lease Victory Model revolvers originally chambered for the British .38/200 were returned to the U.S. and rechambered to fire the more popular and more powerful .38 Special ammunition, and such revolvers are usually so marked on their barrels. Rechambering of .38-200 cylinders to .38 Special results in oversized chambers which may cause problems. Lee Harvey Oswald was carrying a re-chambered Victory Model when he was apprehended on November 22, 1963.[10]

The finish on Victory Models was typically a sandblasted and parkerized finish, which is noticeably different from the higher-quality blue or nickel/chrome finishes usually found on commercial M&P/Model 10 revolvers. Other distinguishing features of the Victory Model revolver are the lanyard loop at the bottom of the grip frame, and the use of smooth (rather than checkered) walnut grip panels. However some early models did use a checkered grip, most notably the pre-1942 manufacture.[11]

Smith & Wesson Model 10 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
are you interested ?
 
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