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Discussion Starter #1
I recently purchased a new beretta and the furniture has a dull oil finish that seems to hide some of the nice characteristics the wood has. I have some Tru-Oil and mineral spirits and have done some research and had a few questions before I get started..

1. The wood is brand new and has not been exposed to elements or handling, what should I do for prep before starting?

2. I keep reading of wet sanding.. I understand the concept but unlike automotive coatings I do not think water would be the correct application.. Is this with mineral spirits or another solvent?

3. Any special tips and proper sand paper suggestions during the different coatings process would be appreciated.

Thanks in Advance
 

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I recently purchased a new beretta and the furniture has a dull oil finish that seems to hide some of the nice characteristics the wood has. I have some Tru-Oil and mineral spirits and have done some research and had a few questions before I get started..

1. The wood is brand new and has not been exposed to elements or handling, what should I do for prep before starting?

2. I keep reading of wet sanding.. I understand the concept but unlike automotive coatings I do not think water would be the correct application.. Is this with mineral spirits or another solvent?

3. Any special tips and proper sand paper suggestions during the different coatings process would be appreciated.

Thanks in Advance
pull the stock and clean it using naptha, if your not happy with the color true oil will just highlight it. don't use steelwool as it will stick in the wood pores and rust later,tape off you checkering you can use sctchbright pads or open coat (3m) sandpaper 280 grit and up. thin your true oil 50/50 1st couple of coats,let each coat dry completely!!. buff between coats using a backer block. Rub on undeluted true oil until you get what you like,then let it dry at least 10 days before rubbing out the finnish,use rotten stone and pariffin oil. (cabinet/furniture maker) 40+ yrs. good luck
 

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Discussion Starter #3
pull the stock and clean it using naptha, if your not happy with the color true oil will just highlight it. don't use steelwool as it will stick in the wood pores and rust later,tape off you checkering you can use sctchbright pads or open coat (3m) sandpaper 280 grit and up. thin your true oil 50/50 1st couple of coats,let each coat dry completely!!. buff between coats using a backer block. Rub on undeluted true oil until you get what you like,then let it dry at least 10 days before rubbing out the finnish,use rotten stone and pariffin oil. (cabinet/furniture maker) 40+ yrs. good luck
Do you cut the Oil with Naptha?
 

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Do you cut the Oil with Naptha?
NO! naptha is for the cleaning process,(wax,dirt removal) I cut the "oil" with paint thinner,a little goes along ways.If you rub the oil on to hard you will get heat strokes in the finnish,if so let it dry sand and reaply. take your time,most people rush the finishing process and are unhappy with the results.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
NO! naptha is for the cleaning process,(wax,dirt removal) I cut the "oil" with paint thinner,a little goes along ways.If you rub the oil on to hard you will get heat strokes in the finnish,if so let it dry sand and reaply. take your time,most people rush the finishing process and are unhappy with the results.
Are there any substitutes for Paraffin oil?
 

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You need to completely strip the existing finish off first before you put the new finish on, esp if you think the current finish is hiding the grain.

Personally I'd wait until you've used the gun for a few years, based on the questions you're asking there's a very high liklihood that the result of your project will look worse than the brand new factory finish.

You're not looking at a 20 minute project here, more like 15+ hours to do it right esp w/ a hand rubbed finish.

In summary, leave it alone for now.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
You need to completely strip the existing finish off first before you put the new finish on, esp if you think the current finish is hiding the grain.

Personally I'd wait until you've used the gun for a few years, based on the questions you're asking there's a very high liklihood that the result of your project will look worse than the brand new factory finish.

You're not looking at a 20 minute project here, more like 15+ hours to do it right esp w/ a hand rubbed finish.

In summary, leave it alone for now.

Well I was thinking since the Gun has an oil finish to it that I would not have to strip anything off. The stock looks incomplete to me and almost Dry which does not let me wood characteristics pop.

So I guess your inferring that the questions I am asking make me look stupid and its in my best interest to not mess with the wood at all???

Appreciate your help
 

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Well I was thinking since the Gun has an oil finish to it that I would not have to strip anything off. The stock looks incomplete to me and almost Dry which does not let me wood characteristics pop.

So I guess your inferring that the questions I am asking make me look stupid and its in my best interest to not mess with the wood at all???

Appreciate your help
There is a difference between an oil finish and a Tru-Oil finish.

Tru_oil is a wiping varnish. Linseed oil and derivatives are not (I now use pure orange oil, btw).

Tru_oil will look great if it is well done. I used it on a guitar I built and it looked amazing. It can also look like chit if the surface isn't properly prepped or if the job is not undertaken in a meticulous and patient manner.

I'm not inferring anything, btw-I know nothing about your skill levels. Mine are pretty basic, so I can tell you with the knowledge of experience that it's easy to screw up a wiping varnish finish. I have.

The good news is you can take it off and start again if you do get it wrong. I did. The bad news is your gun is out of action now for at least twice as long.

If you do go the Tr-Oil route, expect weeks to get it perfect if the weather is kind. If it's super cold that could translate to a month.

Just my experience, and as I say I'm no master, not even close.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I understand the timeline of what it will take, I was planning on practicing on other wood. If I can just figure out a good procedure and materials list I should be able to pick this up no problem. Was looking for more helpful tips than just don’t do it. Everyone has to start somewhere
 

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I am familiar with the Beretta finish, and believe they stain all of their wood to eliminate any "matching" required. Sometimes you have a lot of figure under that "chocolate pudding" stain. But seldom will the stripped wood on the butt stock match the wood on the fore arm. I have found that a good stripper - sold by Walmart - does a great job if you remember to thoroughly clean the stock after stripping. I used a mixture of water (50%), liquid hand soap (10%) and vinegar (40%) and SCRUB the stock and checkering to get the stripper out of the wood pores. There are several very good stock stains on the market - Brownell's has a really good selection - choose carefully and follow the directions. If you can handle a spray can, Brownell's handles a Class Oil Spray (not oil) that provides a nice hard finish of either satin or gloss. Or, if you want an actual oil finish and will take the time, Dusty Bird offers a really good classic oil stock finish. Good Luck.
 

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I have done several Beretta stocks because of their finish being rather inferior. I cleaned the stock with mineral spirits, and simply put the Tru-Oil on over their finish. Tape off the checkering and rub it on by hand, or spray if you can find it. Then I wet sand with 2000 grit sandpaper and a block on the larger flat areas, and folded over in the curved areas. I use a 3000 grit sponge to get a better polish. Then I buff it out using a very fine grit polishing compound used for car finishes if you want it a gloss finish. I leave the 3000 grit finish if you want it to look like a hand rubbed finish.

This is to get a gloss surface which will highlight the grain that is already there. You do need to let each coat dry between applications at least two days and apply many coats (sometimes 20). After the finish is built up enough, you have to let it sit for about two weeks to harden enough to polish. You can't be aggressive with the sanding as it is very easy to go through the finish to the wood. Tru-Oil is a very thin application process and it takes a long time to
accomplish. Almost always even though the finish may appear filled and smooth, the pores will sink eventually and you will see them.


This is a very time consuming process (Months). If you are looking for the gloss finish, I just simply strip the finish and do the staining, filling the pores, and finish with an acrylic car finish. Though it is somewhat more involved work, it is actually less time consuming in total, due to the fact you can apply four coats of finish in about an hour, that will be the thickness of probably 6 coats of Tru-Oil each.
 

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I learned to finish stocks using tru-oil 40 years ago on my brand new wingmaster that I ruined with mosquito spray from my arms. I think I did an amazing job for an 18 yr old kid. It looked better than brand new. Tru-oil is beautiful in my eye. You can do it. Patience is your friend. I like hunter 45 instructions. Sound better than mine but I will add one thing. I do use a wet water cloth on the bare wood to raise the whiskers. Let dry Sand off and then one more time. Let dry well. I’m not saying soaked, just damp. After that do as hunter suggests. I think it brings out the grain better in the end. Good luck.
 

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Try Miniwax antique oil. Superior to tru oil IMO as it drys faster, looks very natural. and is more forgiving.
I ,knowing this isn't exactly a gun stock, but. Refinished a quarter sawn oak cabinet wit the Antique Oil. I dry sanded to 220 then went to wet sanding with 320, then 400, then 600, then 1000 grit,using the Antique oil as my wetting agent. Then allowed it to set briefly then buffed with lintel free cloth. After several 1000 grit wet sand coats. It looks fantastic , and has looked great for many years .
 

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I think the question your asking in regards to sanding in the finish is this first apply 2 thinned and cut 50/ 50 coats to seal the wood good let dry at least a day between coats then start applying coats of finish and sand in the finish while it's still wet starting with 600 grit paper and working all the way down to 2500 grit as the pours fill in each sanding will create a fine slurry of finish that can be rubbed into the wood to fill the pores. After sanding use either a small lint free cloth or your fingers to push the slurry into the pores. Keep it damp with a little fresh finish as you rub it in. After its completely filled smooth let it dry good and then wet sand with water to a smooth finish. Then apply a couple of very light finish coats to obtain the sheen you want and then wait at least 2 weeks to wet sand with 5000 grit foam backed and polish with fine polishing compound. The stuff sold at auto parts stores for clear coat buffing works great for this
 

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Another excellent finish that I use is waterlox original sealer finish it's a tung oil based finish with hardeners in it. It produces a very deep finish that brings out the highlights of the wood. The advantage of oil type finishes is if it's scratched or damaged it's a simple process to fine sand the damage and re apply finish to it and buff
 
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