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Discussion Starter #1
So after 8 months of thought I bought a new Beretta. The wood looks great but I think it could benefit from a few more coats of tru-oil or something else to create more depth in the wood. if I decide to do this can I apply the tru-oil to the existing finish with no preparation, or is it a multi step process that I can screw up. mike
 

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Just get some Johnsons paste floor wax and give it a couple coats. Way easy and it'll do everything you're looking for. And protect the wood.
 

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If the finish on it now is a oil finish, i would apply. Multiple coats. Hand rub it in.
A couple of good coats will give it a nice satin shine. If you want a glossy finish more coats will need to be applied with a good build up. Wet sanded to remove high spots then polished/buffed.
 

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If the finish is high gloss, use a 6" orbital polisher. The same
polisher you use on your car's paint. Use clear coat scratch
remover. It's available from any automotive supply store. It will
bring back the high gloss like-new look.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The wood is EELL but the finish is flat- no gloss. I may try the wax sounds the least invasive. I have a banister which was paste waxed and looks good, most of the wood in my old home we finished with tung oil. Is the wax the paste wax used on furniture or the liquid floor wax? Thanks It's cold and 40 mph winds, no shooting today. mike
 

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Rub the stock down with mineral spirits to get the grime off of it. Tape off the checkering, with masking tape, then cut the outside edges with a razor. When you press down on the tape you can see the outline of the checkering underneath in a good light. Then apply the Tru-Oil. Like stated above once you get enough built up, lightly sand with wet-sandpaper, and a stiff block of rubber or something of the same consistency, to get out any high spots, or dust. Then polish with a very fine polishing compound. I use headlight lens cleaner, and polish. Apply a coat of fine car wax, buff out, and you will see the grain of the wood pop. Remove the tape, and clean out the border of the checkering with a riffler file.

I let the Tru-Oil cure for about three weeks before you do any polishing. Also, I cut around the border of the checkering with a very sharp razor, ever so slightly, and carefully, before removing the tape, as to not peel the finish up, and away with the tape.

grntitan, will show you what the finished product looks like when done in this manner on his Beretta, once he sees this thread.
 

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Don't do it! Don't know what you have now but it's probably a hard two-part finish, maybe an epoxy. Sounds like an "in the wood" finish. If you have never finished a stock it could end up a mess. The border on the checkering will need to be cleaned up no matter how careful you are. Have it sprayed with a couple of coats of automotive clear coat.
 

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Johnny........Won't the checkering fill up with the clear coat. Or if you tape it off how do you feather the edge?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
First let me make it clear that the finish and the wood are first rate. But,I would like it even more it if it had a little gloss, but I can live with it. second I will not be using a mechanical polisher way to easy to go through the finish if its thin: I did that on a car. Third Beretta recommends Tru-oil on their website for their oil finish touch-ups I was hoping it is as easy as when I do our wood work touch ups at our home with tung oil, we just apply a very,very thin coat, with minimal to no prep. I will say i did attempt to strip one of their none oil stocks and nothing would soften the finish but again it was not oil. I want to thank every-one for their experience. mike
 

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Stl Flyn walked me through the process of doing the TruOil on my Beretta. I desired a high gloss look and his process gave me what I was looking for. I did this two winters ago and it has held up great. My Beretta came with the matte finish wood like you described.


This is the best pic I could find but it shows how it really brought out the figuring in the wood. I did roughly 20 coats while wet sanding between. It's a lot of work but worth it.







P.S. If I was to do it again, I'd pay someone. It was a great learning experience but there are folks who are just great with finish work.
 

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Just get the paste wax and save yourself a world of trouble.

just use a toothbrush to keep the wax from building up in the checkering

Seriously
 

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Discussion Starter #14
One of my buddies used Tru-oil on his beretta just went over the existing finish. but I have a few questions about the wax: 1:in the summer does it get gooey? 2: If I want to remove the wax do I use mineral spirits? Again the factory finish and wood are great but I think it can benefit from a little shine. and semperfi my boy is in the corps. mike
 

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1. No - never has for me

2. About anything that will cut wax will cut the finish. Be prepared.

All my best to the kid.

Charlie
 

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This is a Beretta Stock that was polished to high gloss with nothing more than Meguire's Final Glaze and an Orbital polisher.
 

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Yea use paste wax. Then shoot in the rain and spend 2 hours cleaning the "white" wax off your wood. Begin by using an oil soap and clean real good, then use a good liquid furniture oil and really rub it in.

blade819
 

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If you don't like the way it looks with the paste wax, good luck on the job you will have getting it off. Clean the gun with naphtha, and then multiple coats of the tru oil. Keep going till you get the gloss you want. Not that tough. Have done it on Ceasars.
 

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Agree with the others who recommend TruOil. Have done it on 4 stocks - all with great results and a very different shine/gloss than wax/polishing. Super easy to use and you don't necessarily have to steel wool or sand between coats (only if you get uneven buildup). In fact, I'm working on a Model 12 stock now.
 
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