Trapshooters Forum banner

Triggers and trap?

5976 50
How much difference do you experienced shooters think a good trigger makes?
I shoot 2 guns a B725 and a P TMX. I shot HP riffle for years and triggers were very important.
The Perazzi trigger is very good and the Browning kind of sucks. That said I shoot the Browning OK.
Both stocks fit decent.
I really think a nice crisp trigger at about 3 # would not hurt my game.
1 - 20 of 51 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
233 Posts
I set my sbt guns up 3 to 3 1/2 pounds of I shoot a heavy trigger it sometimes result in jerking the gun. Over unders usually require at least 4 to 1/2 pounds to avoid doubling especially with mechanical triggers I've known a few skeet shooters with that problem with light triggers
 

· Registered
Joined
·
15,219 Posts
If you are shooting clay targets how you are supposed to, which is by slapping the trigger, the trigger pull and quality largely doesn't matter. One thing that is important is a good clean trigger reset between shots on doubles, but that would be the same if you are squeezing or slapping the trigger.

I slap the trigger, perhaps more extremely than most, and I'm 100% honest when I say I cannot tell much of a difference when I'm actually shooting between my 3.5lb Kolar trigger and the 7-8lb trigger on my BPS 28 and 410. And I shoot the subgauge BPSs SIGNFICANTLY better than I should on paper (terrible triggers, stock fit is pretty bad, guns are 3-4lbs lighter than my o/u).

When squeezing the trigger on a rifle or pistol my finger is extremely sensitive to any hitch or grit, so it's not like I'm just generally a trigger masher and couldn't tell the difference. When I'm trying to guesstimate trigger pull, and can generally get within a half lb if a trigger gauge just by feel, and can easily feel 1/2lb+ in difference b/w both barrels.

Two tangential thoughts. I think most people put WAY too much concern on shotgun triggers, and I also believe that being a trigger squeezer GREATLY increases your likelihood of eventual trigger flinches and trigger finger lock (inability to pull the trigger).
 

· Registered
Joined
·
13,498 Posts
As long as you can get used to the Browning trigger? You are fine. The triggers on the Beretta's and CG's are nicer. I have shot all 3. I can tell you that IMO, the difference in your average will be in the the .10's of a target. Not a lot of difference for me. Your body gets used to working a certain way without much effort. So once your body gets used to your current shotgun (whatever it might be) it will not be a problem. Now if your finger hurts after shooting, because of age, or a pre-existing problem. I can see how a better trigger with a shorter pull could benefit you more. Otherwise, If you don't think your trigger is a problem, don't worry about it. Worry about looking at the target, and having the absolute confidence in your gun, shells and your ability. Remember if you have any doubt about breaking the next target out of the house for any reason. You will miss it before you even pull the trigger. So work on building your confidence, not on problems with your equipment!!!
Remember Neil's and Tim's tests on pattern percentage's. All barrels preform the same with the same full choke and premium ammo. So a factory 870 barrel, is just as good as a Wilkinson tuned barrel, Krieghoff, or Perazzi. Now go out there and build up your confidence!!! break em all jeff
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,326 Posts
If you are shooting clay targets how you are supposed to, which is by slapping the trigger, the trigger pull and quality largely doesn't matter. One thing that is important is a good clean trigger reset between shots on doubles, but that would be the same if you are squeezing or slapping the trigger.

I slap the trigger, perhaps more extremely than most, and I'm 100% honest when I say I cannot tell much of a difference when I'm actually shooting between my 3.5lb Kolar trigger and the 7-8lb trigger on my BPS 28 and 410. And I shoot the subgauge BPSs SIGNFICANTLY better than I should on paper (terrible triggers, stock fit is pretty bad, guns are 3-4lbs lighter than my o/u).

When squeezing the trigger on a rifle or pistol my finger is extremely sensitive to any hitch or grit, so it's not like I'm just generally a trigger masher and couldn't tell the difference. When I'm trying to guesstimate trigger pull, and can generally get within a half lb if a trigger gauge just by feel, and can easily feel 1/2lb+ in difference b/w both barrels.

Two tangential thoughts. I think most people put WAY too much concern on shotgun triggers, and I also believe that being a trigger squeezer GREATLY increases your likelihood of eventual trigger flinches and trigger finger lock (inability to pull the trigger).
This x a bajillion.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,207 Posts
lock time....that is about all you will even realize.....if ya slap a trigger...you won't really know...now...when we talk release triggers...that's a whole can of worms we don't need to elaborate on....I shoot one...or two or 6...depends on the gun i am holding at the time...I love shooting my Model 12 with a release...but when I shoot the Ljutic or P gun with a release...well...it is like going home at 2 with a 10 and waking up at 10 with a 2....

JMO,
Wadcrusher
 

· Administrator
Joined
·
9,666 Posts
I feel triggers make a difference. I shoot a Ljutic for singles and caps and there is a very big difference between triggers on the Ljutic and other shotguns that I own such as CG--Beretta both break and semi auto and others.

Once you find one that you enjoy and really like stick with it, to me a trigger on a shotgun that is too crisp does not work well but you do not want to be yanking to the point where it gets into your head.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
297 Posts
My father used to say, "If you can't tell the difference between a cheap bottle of wine and an expensive bottle of wine, drink the cheap wine. Once you start drinking the expensive stuff, it won't take long before you won't be able to drink the cheap stuff." So if you can't tell the difference between triggers why sweat it. But just because you can't tell the difference doesn't mean there isn't one. There is a certain appreciation boardering on joy that I get when I mount and shoot a well balanced shotgun with a refined trigger. I took my father's advice on the wine, but I did not apply iit to shotguns. That turned out to be a rather expensive choice.

I think a good trigger makes a difference.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,988 Posts
If you are shooting clay targets how you are supposed to, which is by slapping the trigger, the trigger pull and quality largely doesn't matter. One thing that is important is a good clean trigger reset between shots on doubles, but that would be the same if you are squeezing or slapping the trigger.

I slap the trigger, perhaps more extremely than most, and I'm 100% honest when I say I cannot tell much of a difference when I'm actually shooting between my 3.5lb Kolar trigger and the 7-8lb trigger on my BPS 28 and 410. And I shoot the subgauge BPSs SIGNFICANTLY better than I should on paper (terrible triggers, stock fit is pretty bad, guns are 3-4lbs lighter than my o/u).

When squeezing the trigger on a rifle or pistol my finger is extremely sensitive to any hitch or grit, so it's not like I'm just generally a trigger masher and couldn't tell the difference. When I'm trying to guesstimate trigger pull, and can generally get within a half lb if a trigger gauge just by feel, and can easily feel 1/2lb+ in difference b/w both barrels.

Two tangential thoughts. I think most people put WAY too much concern on shotgun triggers, and I also believe that being a trigger squeezer GREATLY increases your likelihood of eventual trigger flinches and trigger finger lock (inability to pull the trigger).
I agree with you 100%. As long my shotguns go off when I slap the trigger it's a good trigger.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,326 Posts
My father used to say, "If you can't tell the difference between a cheap bottle of wine and an expensive bottle of wine, drink the cheap wine. Once you start drinking the expensive stuff, it won't take long before you won't be able to drink the cheap stuff." So if you can't tell the difference between triggers why sweat it. But just because you can't tell the difference doesn't mean there isn't one. There is a certain appreciation boardering on joy that I get when I mount and shoot a well balanced shotgun with a refined trigger. I took my father's advice on the wine, but I did not apply iit to shotguns. That turned out to be a rather expensive choice.

I think a good trigger makes a difference.
The problem is that you are meant to savour wine. Drink it slowly, appreciate all the aromas and flavours.
You don’t shoot a clay target slowly. You shoot it like you take a dose of cough medicine, quick and sharp.
 

· What squad am I on?
TriStar TT15
Joined
·
8,767 Posts
I developed a bad flinch with my Ljutic so I sent it down the road. Was later told I had a spring or something going bad which made the weight fluctuate, causing it to not go bang when my brain thought it should.
I have a tendency to trap the trigger on my Browning, never have with any other doubles gun.
The trigger in my Alfermann was faster than me which was something I could never wrap my head around and why I have no desire for a Seitz.
So does the trigger matter? I say sorta. I also believe both grip angle and trigger reach play just as much of a role and in most cases, is more important than the trigger characteristics.
 

· Ya can't miss with a shotgun
Joined
·
3,182 Posts
My own thoughts......

Of course it makes a difference. Whether you “slap” your trigger, pull decisively, or not, good triggers and bad triggers require different amounts of effort to pull whether you notice it or not; pull weight is pull weight regardless of interpretation. It takes 1 pound more effort to pull a 4 lb trigger vs. a 3 lb pull; that equates to a difference.
I agree with Wadhopper about grip ergos and distance between the curve of the grip and the trigger. The farther you have to reach for the trigger, the less weight you can pull easily, and the closer your hand becomes to making a fist, as it is with a shorter trigger reach, the more pressure you can apply. You want the grip to fill the hand so that any pressure you apply is translated directly to an action and not wasted closing up gaps before the action happens.
Also, when shooting Doubles with a gun requiring a long stretch to the trigger, the more likely you are to “trap” the trigger with the first shot, and more pronounced with a LoP that’s too long.

.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
2,391 Posts
I prefer 3.5-4.5 lb pull triggers without much creep for clay shooting and shoot Brownings as good as any other gun. It is very important for me to not consciously think about trigger pull while shooting clay targets. Thoughts like "am I pulling the trigger or slapping the trigger" will ruin a score quickly! Eyes and automated trigger response works best.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
614 Posts
As long as you can get used to the Browning trigger? You are fine. The triggers on the Beretta's and CG's are nicer. I have shot all 3. I can tell you that IMO, the difference in your average will be in the the .10's of a target. Not a lot of difference for me. Your body gets used to working a certain way without much effort. So once your body gets used to your current shotgun (whatever it might be) it will not be a problem. Now if your finger hurts after shooting, because of age, or a pre-existing problem. I can see how a better trigger with a shorter pull could benefit you more. Otherwise, If you don't think your trigger is a problem, don't worry about it. Worry about looking at the target, and having the absolute confidence in your gun, shells and your ability. Remember if you have any doubt about breaking the next target out of the house for any reason. You will miss it before you even pull the trigger. So work on building your confidence, not on problems with your equipment!!!
Remember Neil's and Tim's tests on pattern percentage's. All barrels preform the same with the same full choke and premium ammo. So a factory 870 barrel, is just as good as a Wilkinson tuned barrel, Krieghoff, or Perazzi. Now go out there and build up your confidence!!! break em all jeff
Nicely stated.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
8,260 Posts
How much difference do you experienced shooters think a good trigger makes?
I shoot 2 guns a B725 and a P TMX. I shot HP riffle for years and triggers were very important.
The Perazzi trigger is very good and the Browning kind of sucks. That said I shoot the Browning OK.
Both stocks fit decent.
I really think a nice crisp trigger at about 3 # would not hurt my game.
I am here to state my disagreement with several of the others.

I believe that clean triggers of moderate weight (3.25-4#'s) are an important factor in successful development and sustained effectiveness when shooting a shotgun. My hunting guns have better triggers than probably the majority of trapshooters have on there target guns.

I am a trigger slapper and I guarantee you that a trigger over 4.5# and the gun will be off my shoulder with eyes looking at it trying to figure out the issue of not firing. Same if a gun has a sloppy trigger.

Large poundage/sloppy/excessive trigger creep are also a reason that I believe puts shooters into releases prematurely.

I don't care if you slap, squeeze, tug whatever, a junk trigger will adversely effect your scoring and may instill new issues for you to deal with elsewhere.

A good trigger job isn't that expensive.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
1,531 Posts
I shot release/double release for 25+ years. A nerve injury caused the right arm problems, time healed the nerves. I am now working hard to rewire my brain to shoot not only pull triggers but double triggers too! I need to have the triggers be clean and bright and I slap the crap out of them! My doubles are coming along with a few 10's--I have not registered any but will as confidence grows.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
My personal take, yes, triggers are important for shotguns. Just not comp rifle level.

If they weren't, I don't think companies like Krieghoff would be around. Those shotguns seem to be designed around their trigger group (only a slide lock action seems to have enough space)

Sent from my SM-G973U using Tapatalk
 
1 - 20 of 51 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top