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With a 30 to 34" pattern at 30 - 34 yrds. you should still be in the break zone of the target.
That's not really have pattern performance works. There's not a 'break zone' and 'non break zone'. Its all probabilities of hit from the center to the last flyer. Except for brand new shooters we are pointing with the innermost 10" of the pattern. Its why a small change in POI can feel like such a big deal but cause that change in POI is relative to the 10" we point with.


Because trap targets require a minimum of 2 or 3 pellets to break the going away presentation the useable part of the pattern is 22 to 24 inches.
I like how you said 2 or 3 pellets, like depending on which version of physics was loaded into the firmware that day.
1 pellet can break trap targets just fine. More pellets increases the chances of the target being broken.
 

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[QUOTE="hbar314
1 pellet can break trap targets just fine. More pellets increases the chances of the target being broken.
[/QUOTE]
We have all broken targets with one pellet but we've all also dusted targets hit with one pellet.
Since we don't shoot trap virtually I say two or three pellets.
Henry
 

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You can’t fix stupid!

Moderators, please shut down this thread based on the ignorance and inexperience of certain members posting comments based on ZERO facts or proven shooting ability. They literally have no credibility, nor have they provided any empirical evidence or facts they know what they are talking about. Therefore they add “NOTHING” to this discussion.

This member is a troll, literally making a mockery of your website.
 

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[QUOTE="hbar314
1 pellet can break trap targets just fine. More pellets increases the chances of the target being broken.
We have all broken targets with one pellet but we've all also dusted targets hit with one pellet.
Since we don't shoot trap virtually I say or two pellets.
Henry
[/QUOTE]

Thank you for your input and diplomacy regarding this topic. Your proven ability lends credibility to anyone seeking answers and advice regarding this subject.
 

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We have all broken targets with one pellet but we've all also dusted targets hit with one pellet.
Since we don't shoot trap virtually I say or two pellets.
Henry
Thank you for your input and diplomacy regarding this topic. Your proven ability lends credibility to anyone seeking answers and advice regarding this subject.
[/QUOTE]
Thanks for the compliment.
I look forward to the debate on this subject and if we stick to the facts the truth will prevail.
The folks who are wrong will be proven so.
When I'm wrong I view it as a learning experience.
Henry
 

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We have all broken targets with one pellet but we've all also dusted targets hit with one pellet.
Since we don't shoot trap virtually I say two or three pellets.
Henry
And like lots of people have posted before about picking up clays with 2, 3, 4 holes in them....those clays didn't break either. Arbitrarily stating that 2 or 3 is the required minimum is a guess. If it was fact certainty it wouldn't have an OR between it.
Now, the fact is, that one pellet can break the target if it has the energy to do it. But just like pattern performance its a probabilities issue.
 

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If that is true, then why do the majority of people that transfer into a Seitz for the first time require a higher POI to achieve similar or increase their target breaking performance?
The key part of your question is "transfer into". So they're coming from another gun. I doubt lock time is the reason. More like gun fit, quality of trigger pull and its parameters, and so on. There's only one shotgun that I've fired in which lock time was a factor, and that's the old Browning Recoilless. Lock time has never been an issue to me with other shotguns.
 

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The key part of your question is "transfer into". So they're coming from another gun. I doubt lock time is the reason. More like gun fit, quality of trigger pull and its parameters, and so on. There's only one shotgun that I've fired in which lock time was a factor, and that's the old Browning Recoilless. Lock time has never been an issue to me with other shotguns.
The Ljutic Space Gun's lock time was so slow you could smoke a cigarette after pulling the trigger before the gun went off :ROFLMAO:
 

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The Ljutic Space Gun's lock time was so slow you could smoke a cigarette after pulling the trigger before the gun went off :ROFLMAO:
I had 1 as well. You timed the trigger pull with a calendar!!!!
 
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And it didn't make any difference at all
At that point and time of my shooting career it didn't. It was a cool gun that l bought for l had the opportunity to acquire. I thought it would shoot better than what l had. WRONG!! I traded/sold it for a Ithaca 4E.
 

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Be interesting to hear from all of the M12, 870, and 1100 shooters who manage to overcome the abysmal lock time their guns have. Maybe they just shoot them like shotguns instead of rifles.
You'd obviously be surprised what putting a magnum hammer spring in a Md12 trigger or clipping a couple coils off an 870 or 1100 and the change it makes.
 

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Be interesting to hear from all of the M12, 870, and 1100 shooters who manage to overcome the abysmal lock time their guns have. Maybe they just shoot them like shotguns instead of rifles.
Daro Handy shot an 1100. He shot a Timney release trigger and usually had five of them at any one time. It was adjustable for lock time and trigger pull up, travel of the trigger itself. It was so important to him, he cleaned and checked his trigger between every event. Not every trap shoot, every EVENT, singles, handicap and doubles. He was that sensitive to trigger performance and would tell you without a doubt how important it was to him. Anyone who shot with him knows this.
Trying to paraphrase the original question, could a faster trigger lock time require an adjustment to your shooting if your current trigger lock time was slower.
If you notice a difference when you shoot, the answer is probably yes.
That doesn’t mean a shooter couldn’t adjust to the new trigger and become or be an exceptional shotgunner. But, having shot several hundred thousand targets, most top shooters would have it adjusted to their specific preferences.
Since everyone is an individual, at a certain level, one’s perception determines what is fast or slow and what they think works best for them.
For some, the truth is only what they believe, regardless of facts, Physics or history. So Charlie,
you’re right, doesn’t change a thing.
 
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