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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Transcranial magnetic simulation for tinnitus was first proposed almost 10 years ago when it was found to help those treated for depression (as an alternative to ECT)
http://www.dizziness-and-balance.com/disorders/hearing/tinnitus/tms.html

A VA study is underway
http://www.research.va.gov/currents/winter2013-14/winter2013-14-21.cfm

The cost is $6000-$10,000 and is unlikely to be covered by insurance since it is still investigational, but you could discuss with your ENT if you might be a candidate to participate in a study.

Anyone here with experience with TMS?
 

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Copied from Wicki~~~

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a noninvasive method used to stimulate small regions of the brain. During a TMS procedure, a magnetic field generator, or "coil" is placed near the head of the person receiving the treatment.
[1]:3 The coil produces small electric currents in the region of the brain just under the coil via electromagnetic induction. The coil is connected to a pulse generator, or stimulator, that delivers electric current to the coil.[2]

TMS is used diagnostically to measure the connection between the brain and a muscle to evaluate damage from stroke,
multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, movement disorders, motor neuron disease and injuries and other disorders affecting the facial and other cranial nerves and the spinal cord.[3]

The use of single-pulse TMS was approved by the FDA for use in
migraine[4] and repetitive TMS (rTMS) for use in treatment-resistant major depressive disorder.[5] Evidence suggests it is useful for neuropathic pain[6] and treatment-resistant major depressive disorder.[6][7] Evidence also suggests that TMS may be useful for negative symptoms of schizophrenia and loss of function caused by stroke.[6] As of 2014, all other investigated uses of rTMS have only possible or no clinical efficacy.[6]

Matching the discomfort of TMS to distinguish true effects from placebo is an important and challenging issue that influences the results of clinical trials.[6][8][9] The greatest risks of TMS are the rare occurrence of syncope (fainting) and even less commonly, induced seizures.[8] Other adverse effects of TMS include discomfort or pain, transient induction of hypomania, transient cognitive changes, transient hearing loss, transient impairment of working memory, and induced currents in electrical circuits in implanted devices.

Personally I doubt it works well enough to be fully approved and verified by the AMA as a legitimate Tinnitus treatment or health care providers would approve and pay for treatment.

Literalist , I feel your pain

Eddie



 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Eddie: to clarify, the AMA (American Medical Association) is a voluntary professional organization, which does NOT represent the vast majority of physicians. It has nothing to do with approving drugs, medical devices or procedures, but might lobby for or against such.
Approval is the job of the FDA, then Medicare Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), a branch of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), sets a reimbursement level, which health insurance carriers use to set their reimbursement level. As long as TMS is viewed as "investigational", no carrier will pay for the procedure.
http://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/ProductsandMedicalProcedures/DeviceApprovalsandClearances/

A health care provider is the human (so far) with whom you have a face-to-face (or internet) encounter at some point-of-service. 40 years ago I got a letter from Missouri Medicaid, which I had never billed, labeled "Dear Vendor". Sadly, that is how "providers" are viewed today; interchangeable robots in which one inserts a set of symptoms (or demands) and out pops a Rx and a sign flashes "NEXT" :(
 
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I always thought that it was caused by damaged hairs or something in the ear and not reversable?? love to find a repair of it
 

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Drew, my mistake.

It is the Food and Drug Administrations job to approve or disapprove medicines and the Dept. of Health & Human Services
to set reimbursement parameters to insurance carriers.


Thanks

Eddie
 

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The one in the lower right corner, of course.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Looks to be a summary of the VA study
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/296828.php

"We do not believe that rTMS should be viewed as a replacement for effective tinnitus management strategies that are available now. Instead, rTMS could augment existing tinnitus therapies and provide a viable option for patients who do not respond favorably to other treatments."

More studies planned, and it might be worth investigating if you could participate.
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Thought I'd update information regarding transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) for tinnitus, since mine is no better, and clearly worse transiently after shooting (despite high quality muffs), road noise, the digital organ at church when the lady gets filled with the Spirit!!, and after taking Naprosyn :(

Here is our previous poll
https://www.trapshooters.com/threads/flinching-and-tinnitus-poll.803363/#post-7540017

Good review article
Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in the Treatment of Tinnitus | IntechOpen

More from the Portland VA study
Transcranial magnetic stimulation for tinnitus: using the Tinnitus Functional Index to predict benefit in a randomized controlled trial
There is a sub-group of responders

2019 statement with "limited evidence or benefit"
Tinnitus and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS)

TMS is FDA approved for major depression (2008) and treatment resistant OCD (2018), but NOT for tinnitus, so the procedure will not be covered by Medicare or private health insurance, and is $400 - 500 per session. There are specialty clinics offering TMS for tinnitus however.
TMS is also being studied for PTSD, anxiety & insomnia.
 

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I know it has been around for years they also looked into doing reverse tinnitus by vibrating the inner ear with the reversed frequency that was lost. Which is not covered since it was still experimental. I wish the VA would include this in their studies. I have it bad when it hits me feels like I have needles in my ears for about 30 seconds.
 
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