Trapshooters Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,115 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Am near the end of my tru oil refinish on my stock and fore end. The tape will come off soon and I will begin touching up the checkering and border with some single line tools.

Firstly, if anyone has any advice on touching up checkering, I'd love to hear it, never done it before.

Secondly, what do you recommend that I use to seal and finish the checkering?

Thanks for any help and advice,

Chip
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,610 Posts
Work very carefully with a single cutter one line at a time. Use a 60 degree cutter if possible and do not try to cut full depth in a single pass. Go over all that needs touching up with the first pass followed by two to four additional passes to the desired depth The 60 degree cutter is easier to control in recutting/touching up checkering. Use the same Tru-Oil to seal the checkering by applying lightly, brushing vigorously with a soft tooth brush to remove all you can and finally wiping with a soft cloth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
534 Posts
Recutting checkering is as difficult, if not more so, than cutting new checkering. Not a project for an amateur. You can easily ruin a nice refinish job by tackling the checkering re-cut without knowledge or experience. I would recommend you have someone who is a professional and does checkering to do the job before you end up with a botched up mess. You didn't mention the brand of gun you have, but if it has a higher value, it would be worth it to get the job done by a pro. As a stock builder and checkerer for over 30 years, I would be happy to quote you a price to do the job, if you would contact me.

Steve
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,989 Posts
Recutting old checkering is NOT for the faint of heart or the inexperienced. You don't know the angle of the original cutter so once you start you're going to need to go over every line or the area you re-cut will have a different texture.

Checkering requires practice on a junk stock. There is a steep learning curve.

As previously mentioned re-checkering is harder. One tiny slip and you're going to have to re-do your new finish.

If you haven't done many checkering projects do not start with something of value.

There are plenty of pros that will do it for a reasonable price.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,408 Posts
Dilute the Tru-oil 50% with mineral spirits for the checkering. You don't want to build up the finish in the checkering.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,115 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the advice so far...

However with regard to it being precise and delicate work, it's less delicate than what I do for a living every day, so this really doesn't scare me.

That being said, do you ever seal or soak the wood before recarving to stiffen it up?

Regards,

Chip
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
263 Posts
Instead of, or in addition to a checkering tool, you might want to look at a checkering rifler-a double sided curved needle file. Much easier to handle than the checkering tool, and available from Brownells.
Maybe it is my age, but I also find magnifying loupes very helpful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,437 Posts
"Firstly, if anyone has any advice on touching up checkering, I'd love to hear it, never done it before."

Well, if you're going to ignore the advice to hire a pro or at least practice on a throwaway, then....

1) Start with the attitude that it's going to take you a long time and 4-5 passes with your cutter to complete the job. If you get tired , impatient, or (worse yet) cocky, stop and give it a rest. Set your cutters to cut on the PULL. Start by placing your cutter just inside the near border and push 1/2-1" towards the center. As you push, you create a dented or slightly scratched line that your cutter will follow on the return. If you make a mistake on the push you can stop, lift the cutter, and start over.

I've checkered and recut dozens of stocks and NEVER used a cutter to cut on the push. And though I've seen it advised, I've never seen the reason explained.

2)As you advance from the near border to the opposite border in a back and forth motion of 1/2" steps, stop 1/4-3/8" short of the opposite border. When you've covered the entire pattern, and left an untouched 1/4" wide border, you can now tackle that last bit as a separate task.

3)Starting at the border opposite you, place the tip of your cutter at the border and gently PULL away from it, towards the center of the pattern. In other words, never try to run up to the border from the inside of the pattern, and you'll never runover.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Chip,

When you ask about adding anything to stiffen the wood. Do you mean it is bare from when the stock was stripped of its finish? If so you will certainly want to seal it and let it dry before you begin recutting. You never checker or rec cut checking in bare wood.

The 50/50 mix of tru-oil and mineral spirits would be the best thing since you did a tru oil finish on the stock. Use a tooth brush and brush te finish into the checkering before you cut if it is bare wood and again after you are done. If during the recutting process your wood begins to fuzz up then seal it again and give it a couple days to dry before continuing.

The single line cutter is the tool to use for recutting. Turn on some good music, take your time and enjoy.

Good luck, Doug
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
742 Posts
Unless the checkering is really worn, almost obliterated, you probably don't need to recut it as much as clean it out and retouch it. Use a pointer for that (a specially designed file). Actual cutters allow you to do more damage faster, and even if your cuts are good, you will have to use a pointer clean things up afterward.

Work with a 60 degree pointer if the checkering is flat-topped, a 90 degree if the diamonds are pointed. Pointing is fairly light-handed work and should not be too difficult for a careful beginner. I would suggest you get both a push and a pull. It's the same kind of head in each handle, but you install one of the heads backwards so that it cuts on a pull stroke - you don't want to be pushing toward your border and overshoot your edge, so you use the pull tool to cut away from the border. They also make little beeny pointers, about 3/16" long, and I would get one of those set up to pull. You will need it to work in the corners.

Some checkering has a finish, some doesn't, your choice. If you use a finish, it should be at least as dark as whatever treatment you gave the stock. I usually used a stained oil like Pilkingtons, apply it uncut, let it sit for a few minutes, then work it over with a fine bristle toothbrush, and dab off the excess.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,115 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
wm rike,

Is this the pointer you speak of (see link above)?

Doug,

Yes, it is bare from being stripped.

Thanks,

Chip
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Then by all means give it a couple treatments of tru oil to stabilize the wood before you start recutting the checkering. Make sure you let it dry good before you start.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,437 Posts
After one pass with the cutter, I'm checkering bare wood.





I continue checkering bare wood until I'm done.





Then 2,3 possibly 4 coats of finish....the minimum required to just create a shine tells me the checkering is sealed with no unnecessary buildup.



 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top