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I am trying out tite group powder and while I like the consistency of the loads I am finding that it leaving my barrel a dirt mess.

My load:
17.1 grains
1.125 shot
TGT Remington wad
Gun Club Hulls

Anyone else have this problem or am I doing something wrong?
 

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I used it a lot and found it to be very clean. I started using it after reading some info where it was tested against a bunch of other powders of similar speed and in those tests it was found to be the cleanest of the bunch.
 

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I am trying out tite group powder and while I like the consistency of the loads I am finding that it leaving my barrel a dirt mess.

My load:
17.1 grains
1.125 shot
TGT Remington wad
Gun Club Hulls

Anyone else have this problem or am I doing something wrong?
What primer?
 

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OK, this is almost exactly a load I tested recently.

This should generate about 8900 psi (which is plenty for complete combustion) and 1150 fps, according to my test gun.
 

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Thank you Tim,
Your testing is another conformation that a lot of the data is incorrect.
The data states,
Screenshot_20200412-121032_Chrome.jpg

But your testing shows that this data is not accurate.
I believe that for this reason some folks claim one powder is softer shooting than others. The truth is, they're not confirming the speed of there shells!
If they were the same speed, with same shot weight, they would confirm no recoil difference in powder.
MG
 

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The loads being different on Hodgon and Tim by about 50fps not too unusual. Different powder lot numbers fairly commonly give more difference than what you expect. If you have chronograph you notice pretty quickly that published loads can vary with what you are able to observe after loading up something right from a loading table.
 

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The loads being different on Hodgon and Tim by about 50fps not too unusual. Different powder lot numbers fairly commonly give more difference than what you expect. If you have chronograph you notice pretty quickly that published loads can vary with what you are able to observe after loading up something right from a loading table.
Part of that philosophy is that consumer chronographs are NOT accurate when testing shotgun shells. The only way to aquire this information is the test lab.
Happy Easter To All,
MG
 

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I agree it is improper to do felt recoil comparisons on the assumption two loads produce the same speed just because the data manual says they do. Felt recoil comparisons should not be done unless and until it has been confirmed, either through testing or a chronograph, that the two loads produce the same speed.
Part of that philosophy is that consumer chronographs are NOT accurate when testing shotgun shells. The only way to aquire this information is the test lab.
Happy Easter To All,
MG
A consumer chronographs may not be as accurate as one would like, but I think they would do a good enough job telling you whether two loads were the same speed. Now, that pro-grade system timb99 uses, that's a different ball park.
 

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Part of that philosophy is that consumer chronographs are NOT accurate when testing shotgun shells. The only way to aquire this information is the test lab.
Happy Easter To All,
MG
I have also came across that, but details were always scant. Could you tell some more about the problems of chronographs and shotguns? I have actually had more problems measuring high powered rifles than shotguns. My shotgun measurements seem to be pretty consistent, but I had a really bad time recently measuring rifle velocities, they were all over the place, until I moved back from the chrono a longer distance. I have two chronos and they have both seemed to work pretty well on shotgun loads, and pistol loads. If chronographs are the problem, should we be asking the load testers what chrono they use?
 

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The chronos the load testers use are completely different than the consumer chronos. The load testers use the kind of equipment timb99 has.
 

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I cant tell from photo but crimp can effect burn this was from NEBs,,Crimp Depth Velocity Chamber Pressure
0.030″ (too loose) 1,308 fps 9,300 psi
0.050″ (normal reload crimp) 1,329 fps 10,500 psi
0.070″ (too tight) 1,351 fps 11,900 psi
0.090″ (very tight crimp) 1,363 fps 13,100 psi
 

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I cant tell from photo but crimp can effect burn this was from NEBs,,Crimp Depth Velocity Chamber Pressure
0.030″ (too loose) 1,308 fps 9,300 psi
0.050″ (normal reload crimp) 1,329 fps 10,500 psi
0.070″ (too tight) 1,351 fps 11,900 psi
0.090″ (very tight crimp) 1,363 fps 13,100 psi
The crimps in the pic look inconsistent. The one in the center of the pic looks borderline too deep while the one on the left looks too shallow. But, it could just look that way due to the angle from which the pic was taken.
 

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I have also came across that, but details were always scant. Could you tell some more about the problems of chronographs and shotguns? I have actually had more problems measuring high powered rifles than shotguns. My shotgun measurements seem to be pretty consistent, but I had a really bad time recently measuring rifle velocities, they were all over the place, until I moved back from the chrono a longer distance. I have two chronos and they have both seemed to work pretty well on shotgun loads, and pistol loads. If chronographs are the problem, should we be asking the load testers what chrono they use?
The explanation I read somewhere explained that depending on each individual shell you MIGHT have a flyer pellet or 2 that are out ahead of the main shot stream and are an abberation from what the shot stream is doing. Our inexpensive home chronos just measure the first thing goes over them and that's what you get. Some shells might not have an abberent pellet and the first one might be doing what everything else is doing, in which case your data should be close.

The professional chronos for shotshells measure the whole shot stream or the majority of it, I've read. How I'm not sure but it's expensive.

As for rifle, in my experience playing with chrono placement can help. I'm usually about 6ft from muzzle. Try moving it down and shoot over it higher. If light is right you can shoot much higher over mine (Prochrono) than the guides extend up to. In fact I removed the metal rods, replaced with wooden dowels and leave the tops off. Less chance of ruining something if you shoot a dowel. Best light for me is midday bright but a thin to moderate cloud cover. Any problems I've had getting goofy readings have been either early or late in the day when sun is low but sometimes bright sun can be problematic in the right conditions.
 
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