Trapshooters Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello,
Over the last few years I have had two Timmney release triggers for 1100 Remingtons. Both are steel housings. One a smooth trigger face, the other a grooved trigger face. I kept one and sold the other to a friend. The one that I sold (grooved trigger), has a speed lock hammer. It also has a slot in the plunger, that the hammer rides in. These are the differences that I notice, with out dis assembling them and comparing them part for part.
The Timmney that I kept has a Remington factory hammer and no slot in the plunger.
I have purchased a Speed Lock Hammer, and would like to replace the Remington hammer in my Timmney with the speed lock hammer.
The hammers have the "catch" or hook in different locations. The first question that I have is, can I swap the hammer with no issues, since there are some differences.
Will just the hammer "improve" the trigger.
Between the two Timmney triggers, as they are now, I feel the one with the speedlock hammer, is a bettere trigger. It has less travel on the release, and is quite noticeable. I initially tried to improve my trigger via the adjustment screws and made no improvements.
Has anyone else tried this ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,691 Posts
To get the benefit of the Speedlock hammer you need a stronger hammer spring. That creates more resistance when the bolt travels back to reset the hammer, and increases the chance you'll break the hammer. I think that's what was happening and why you see so few Speedlock triggers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I have picked up a extra power wolf spring (Midway Usa) for the change. Just wanted to see if the change is a compatable with what I have.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
507 Posts
I had both. Actually have 3 now, and converted them all to standard hammers. I use the standard Rem hammer spring under the piston. Bought 2 of them from a poster named "Allem" or something like that. (No offense, please, on the possible misspell). There was no real difference. It's not like you don't need to be in front of a hard right when you have a speed hammer, or something like that. (Sorry about the double negative).

You said: "It has less travel on the release, and is quite noticeable. I initially tried to improve my trigger via the adjustment screws and made no improvements." You are definitely doing something wrong there.

There are 2 screws on the back of a steel housing Timney trigger, (they're the ones with the wide trigger, there is no safety on these!)

The screw closest to the center adjusts how far the hook falls in relation to the sear. What that means is: with the screw backed out, when you "set" the trigger, you barely need to relax the trigger and it WILL go off. With the screw adjusted in... you can "set" the trigger and allow it (the trigger) to go forward as much as you require before it goes off.

The furthest back screw will determine how much pressure it takes to "set" the trigger. If you screw it in, it will take more pressure to "set", and it may seem that the trigger goes off as soon as you relax ("will" it to shoot), or if you back it out the trigger will be easy to "set" but may not respond as well when you want it to, to go off "right now".

I don't know of any other trigger that lets you just "dial in" what you want. Good Luck, and shoot well!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Shooter R thanks for the reply. Did the triggers you converted, to a factory hammer, have a slot in the plunger that the hammer rides in? If so did you use it with the factory hammer or replace it with a factory non slotted plunger?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
507 Posts
The speed hammer had the slotted plunger. You need to use the flat top original part if you use the regular hammer. As I remember, the speed hammer had a bump that rode in the slot to increase speed leverage. I took all 3 of my triggers completely apart and adjusted the hook/sear gaps to .020". As checked on my Lyman Trigger Scale, it takes 5 pounds 6 ounces to drop the hook. These settings work well for me.

Be sure the rear screw has the spring under it that pushes the trigger forward. If in fact you do have the Timney All Steel housing, and it's the one with the wider trigger and has no provision for a safety, (some converted triggers had a brass plug where the safety used to be, the one's I'm referring to have none), you will need to buy new hammer pins. You can get them from Brownells and they are called: HAMMER PIN/NON SYN TRGR PLATE, part number 767-000-149.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Shooter R,
Thanks again, I will be in the market for some slotted plungers. If you are intetested in letting your speed lock components go, please drop me a PM.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top