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Thoughts and recommendations

2799 Views 25 Replies 19 Participants Last post by  Dutch2016
I’ve been thinking about starting to reload. My son shoots scholastic trap and with the current situation of not being able to find shells and the cost when you do find em would it be worth the cost to reload? He shoots about 8000 targets a year. I was thinking a progressive press. What brand would be user friendly and not break the bank? I know components are tough to find now although i do have powder and I picked up 7 bags of shot, I have primers back ordered, who knows when they’ll come in. Any thoughts?
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+2 on the MEC 9000 for a good press that will not break the bank. Should be able to find a used one. As stated, components very hard to find if you were not prepared in advance.
Winchester and (I think Federal) have programs for school teams to get shells, I would look into that while waiting on your back order.
 

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I agree, if your son is going to actively learn to reload contact member Joe Kuhn, reloaders for youth

that being said your in a hard place with potential ammo and primer shortage,

I'd treat reloading as a learning experience, who knows how long your friend will share his primers with you, 1k is a nice batch but isn't going to last very long,

I'd continue to buy shells and take this as a time to learn reloading, reloading isn't as much about saving money as it is about creating your own load and doing it at your need.

On shotgun world they have a "read this first" about reloading, one of the first things is, don't buy supplies until you know what you want your recipe to be, machine, hull, speed,
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I agree, if your son is going to actively learn to reload contact member Joe Kuhn, reloaders for youth

that being said your in a hard place with potential ammo and primer shortage,

I'd treat reloading as a learning experience, who knows how long your friend will share his primers with you, 1k is a nice batch but isn't going to last very long,

I'd continue to buy shells and take this as a time to learn reloading, reloading isn't as much about saving money as it is about creating your own load and doing it at your need.

On shotgun world they have a "read this first" about reloading, one of the first things is, don't buy supplies until you know what you want your recipe to be, machine, hull, speed,
Thanks. I’m not jammed up on shells yet. Probably have enough to get half way through the season so not pressed to get anything going right away. And yes, i would like for my son to learn the reloading part of it. He’s been shooting three years now and he’s got the bug pretty bad!
 

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You are going to save about $2.00 - $2.50 per box by reloading if you compare with Premium ammo (AA's or STS) @ 8.00 per box. You will only save about $0.50 per box compared to Top Guns type ammo at $6.00 per box.
You can pay for the loader in your first year of shooting about 300 boxes of shells. ($600) That is about what new MEC 9000g will run. Used presses may be a problem to fix up and get going.
When you get started pick one hull and stick to it. It will keep you from having to adjust the press all the time. I would suggest Remington or AA's. Which ever is most available to you.
As far as loads, a standard 1 1/8 ounce load at 1200 fps will break everything. If you are only shooting 16 yard then one ounce is sufficient. Again, for now pick one load and stay with it. Depending on the powder you can find, you will get 3000-3200 shells from an 8lb jug. You will need 24# to get through a season.
Your hulls can be reloaded five times without worry. After that you will be culling out bad hulls. If you can source 2000 hulls, that will get you through a season. There are lots of guys with garbage cans full of hulls. Many here on this forum would assist you if it is helping out a youth shooter.
My opinion on a press is a MEC 9000g. It is easy to learn on and parts can be found locally. There's always support with all the presses from the factory, it just takes a little longer.

Once you decide what direction you are going check back in and ask for help. A couple questions asked here will save you hours of frustration.

Good luck and enjoy.
 

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I love the 9000s but would recommend a new one over used. Just spent $250 for a rebuild at MEC to include shipping both ways. That machine is a dozen years old and has loaded many thousands of rounds. I like Grabbers for the small gauges since they don't spill shot like the 9000s.
 

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I have only used mec but I love my 9000 fast and efficient. Parts are easy to come by when needed.

You will save money over time depending on where you are able to find supplies. I enjoy reloading and the plus side I know what is in every hull.


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I have been reloading for Several years now. A few of the guys that used to reload sold Their equipment and started buying shells because they said that they could not reload for the price that they could buy shells. Those same guys are struggling trying to find shells today.

In the meantime I have been building my supplies up to the point that I Now have enough supplies to last me for the next four years.

I do not purchase small amounts at one time since there is no savings and doing so. If you do not have the money to purchase enough to save on hazmat fees , then you are wasting your time. I try to avoid having to pay hazmat fees if at all possible. Also if you don’t have a source to buy Shot for no more than $40 a bag , than don’t bother , unless you are just fed up with trying to find shells every week.
 
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