Trapshooters Forum banner
1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all, I have been working on a masters thesis proposal for a paper that I plan on writing. Currently, my tentative title will be “The recreation sports of clay-pigeon shooting: The impact it had on the Aerial Gunnery Training Program of World War II.”

I am trying to establish for the non shooting community, the recreational nature of trap and skeet shooting prior to WWII. Dick Baldwin's, The Road to Yesterday will be one of my major secondary sources that I utilize to establish this point. I would like to know 2 things:

1. Does anyone have any suggestions on other like minded books to use for trap shooting?
2. More importantly, does anyone know of sources I could use that establish the pre war recreation nature of specifically skeet shooting?

Any help would be greatly appreciated and I look forward to reading your responses.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,050 Posts
You might try reading Bob Allen's book "Shooter". It details some interesting shooting history. After he was washed out of the Pilot training for Cadets ( probably by a poor instructor) he went on to be a Army Air Forces gunnery officer and was in the same officer class as Clark Gable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
Yes, Bob Allen's book would be an excellent source. If I remember right he used the skeet field to train future gunners. A good read.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,960 Posts
.........After he was washed out of the Pilot training for Cadets ( probably by a poor instructor) he went on to be a Army Air Forces gunnery officer and was in the same officer class as Clark Gable.
Just curious why you need to make some assumption that it was a poor instructor?
 

·
Well-Known Member
Joined
·
5,458 Posts
I was just reading Skeet and Trap shooting by Richard Shaughnessy and Tap Goodenough... might add something...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,050 Posts
Just curious why you need to make some assumption that it was a poor instructor?
I admit I am going on one description and may be biased However ,Bob Allen went on to before an instrument rated pilot in private life with many many hundreds of hours in several air frame types before health issues ended his flying ,so I'm guessing he would been a lot better military pilot than some who made it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,944 Posts
I admit I am going on one description and may be biased However ,Bob Allen went on to before an instrument rated pilot in private life with many many hundreds of hours in several air frame types before health issues ended his flying ,so I'm guessing he would been a lot better military pilot than some who made it.
My father was am instrument rated pilot. His partner was an instrument rated pilot. His best friend was an instrument rated pilot. None of them were pilots in the war and from what I remember my father saying was it took years to achieve that designation.

Could it possibly be that he could not grasp the material in such a condensed time frame? There is no doubt that many pilots are very smart people and it just may take some longer than others to grasp certain things. My guess is that when in flight school one would have days/weeks to master the program , not months/years.

Not dissing on Mr. Allen but just sayin'.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,344 Posts
You might try reading Bob Allen's book "Shooter". It details some interesting shooting history. After he was washed out of the Pilot training for Cadets ( probably by a poor instructor) he went on to be a Army Air Forces gunnery officer and was in the same officer class as Clark Gable.
Maybe a little off topic but who cares: Clark Gable served for a short time as an air gunner with the 351st Bomb Group (Heavy) based at Polebrook in the UK during WWII.

RAF Polebrook - Wikipedia

The memorial to the 351st is situated near the North East end of what little remains of the main runway. The original "J" type hangar near the former flying control tower is still there. As kids, old friends of mine used to appreciate the generosity of the "Yanks" every Christmas who bused in the children from the surrounding area for special Christmas parties, fed them and gave them presents that were simply not available to ordinary families in wartime Britain :xpb_thumbsup:.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,050 Posts
Maybe a little off topic but who cares: Clark Gable served for a short time as an air gunner with the 351st Bomb Group (Heavy) based at Polebrook in the UK during WWII.

RAF Polebrook - Wikipedia

The memorial to the 351st is situated near the North East end of what little remains of the main runway. The original "J" type hangar near the former flying control tower is still there. As kids, old friends of mine used to appreciate the generosity of the "Yanks" every Christmas who bused in the children from the surrounding area for special Christmas parties, fed them and gave them presents that were simply not available to ordinary families in wartime Britain :xpb_thumbsup:.
Both Bob Allen and Clark Gable were gunnery "Officers". They were in charge of all gunners in their unit and their training and currency. Bob Allen served in the Pacific, Clark Gable in Europe. As Gunnery Officers, They were required to fly a certain number of missions and on those flights they did man one of the gun positions. The story goes that the "Brass" didn't want Clark Gable to fly, fearing that if he were shot down and captured the Germans would use him for propaganda purposes. They wanted to issue a "waver" in his case. It is said he stormed into the COs office , said he wanted NO special treatment, and demanded he fly his required missions. They decided to let him fly those missions. Before the war ended Gable was discharged because if his age but ,he did see action in the skies over Europe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,050 Posts
Where our gun club sits today was once a training site for WWII gunners.
Tyndall AFB FL was one of the Gunnery training sites. I saw some old pictures of their training. They would start out in standing in a stationary position , Then later have the shooter on a moving platform to learn leading a target while in motion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,050 Posts
My father was am instrument rated pilot. His partner was an instrument rated pilot. His best friend was an instrument rated pilot. None of them were pilots in the war and from what I remember my father saying was it took years to achieve that designation.

Could it possibly be that he could not grasp the material in such a condensed time frame? There is no doubt that many pilots are very smart people and it just may take some longer than others to grasp certain things. My guess is that when in flight school one would have days/weeks to master the program , not months/years.

Not dissing on Mr. Allen but just sayin'.
I don't know . I wasn't there. I do know our old Basketball coach was an flight Instructor in WWII. He told me that there were some instructors who that very good but a few were terrible. He said some instructors had bad attitudes and washed people out because of personality conflicts. Like I said I only have one perspective to go on. Guess neither of us "really" knows do we? At any rate Mr. Allen went on to serve his country as an officer and crew member so it's all good in the end.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,944 Posts
I don't know . I wasn't there. I do know our old Basketball coach was an flight Instructor in WWII. He told me that there were some instructors who that very good but a few were terrible. He said some instructors had bad attitudes and washed people out because of personality conflicts. Like I said I only have one perspective to go on. Guess neither of us "really" knows do we? At any rate Mr. Allen went on to serve his country as an officer and crew member so it's all good in the end.
Yes indeed Slide.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,344 Posts
The story goes that the "Brass" didn't want Clark Gable to fly, fearing that if he were shot down and captured the Germans would use him for propaganda purposes. They wanted to issue a "waver" in his case. It is said he stormed into the COs office , said he wanted NO special treatment, and demanded he fly his required missions. They decided to let him fly those missions. Before the war ended Gable was discharged because if his age but ,he did see action in the skies over Europe.
Yep, I read something like that too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
826 Posts
My Dad and 2 of his brothers were in the Royal Airforce and all flew. As far as I can remember my Dad and one Uncle both were taught to shoot clay targets to help with their gunnery skills and both shot trap later in life. If it were not for my Dad and Uncle I may never have started shooting clay targets 55 years ago. I owe them both a lot for what they did in the second world war and for supporting my early years of clay shooting.
Devonian.
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top