"The Grand Old Men of Trap" | Trap Shooters Forum

"The Grand Old Men of Trap"

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Drew Hause, Aug 10, 2017.

  1. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

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  2. Tom king

    Tom king Active Member

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    Fun to look at the past magazine articles very interesting thank you.
     
  3. o-hale

    o-hale Well-Known Member

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    As usual, good read.
    I was just a wee lass back then, 9 years old.
    Someone tell me how much in today's dollars would $80 bucks be?
     
  4. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

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    $10 in 1960 equals $82 in 2017; x 8 = $656

    I turned 9 in March 1961 :)
     
  5. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

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    The New York American, August 25, 1918
    During the recent Grand American Handicap in Chicago, Miss Lucille Meusel, seventeen years, was one of the fairest of the fair competitors. She is pictured at the right. Captain Any Meaders (center), seventy-nine years, had the distinction of being one of the oldest shooters entered. George Miller, nine years, was the "baby" competitor. Master George hails from Brenton, Ala. He is shown at left.

    [​IMG]
     
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  6. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

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    1910 GAH
    Front from left: Harvey McMurchy, Rolla Heikes, Tom Marshall, Elmer Shaner. Back from right: Ed Banks, Fred Quimby, R.R. Merrill, W.R. Crosby, Neaf Apgar, Jack Fanning, Tom Keller.

    [​IMG]

    Harvey McMurchy was a L.C. Smith & Hunter Arms Co. traveling representative and professional trap shooter from 1886 until 1914, and was active in formation of the American Shooting Association and the Interstate Association, forerunners of the ATA. He won the second "International Clay Pigeon (Ligowsky) Tournament" held in New Orleans in 1885 and 21 years later won the first Grand Eastern Handicap at targets July 19, 1906, on the Florist Gun Club grounds, at Philadelphia with the score of 93 out of 100 at 18 yards.
    Harvey was second at the 1910 Grand American Handicap with a 99/100. From 1914 until his retirement in 1921 he was General Manager of the factory in Fulton.

    August 4, 1906 Forest & Stream
    Forest and Stream

    [​IMG]

    July 2, 1910 Forest & Stream
    Forest and Stream

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2017
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  7. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]

    Rolla A. Heikes “The Great and Only” of Dayton, Ohio.
    Born: 12-25-1856
    Died: 9-23-1934
    Heikes, Rolla O. - Inductees

    Heikes was the first industry representatives in 1885, with the LeFever Gun Co., then used a L.C. Smith. In 1895-96, Heikes participated in 67 tournaments (despite having malaria in the summer of 1895) and was high gun in 60 using a Winchester 1893 slide-action. He defeated Fred Gilbert in 1896 at the 2nd “E.C.” Cup for the title “Champion Inanimate Target Shot of the World” in New York.

    He defeated Charles Grimm on Dec. 6 1897 for the Cast Iron Medal using the new Winchester 1897. He defeated Fred Gilbert for the “E.C.” Cup again at Chicago, August 13, 1898, then successfully defended the “Cast Iron Medal” against Fred Gilbert at Eau Claire, Wis., in August and W.R. Elliston in Nashville in October.

    In 1899 he used a Remington Hammerless to defeat E.D. Fulford for the “E.C.” Cup January and won the Sportsmen’s Association Championship Trophy in the trapshooting tournament held on the roof of the Madison Square Garden in March. He had the 2nd High One Day Average Wins to Gilbert and won the Diamond Charm for Expert Class at the New York State Tournament.

    He used a Parker at the 1900 GAH at Live Birds, then went back to his Remington to win the first Grand American at Clay Targets held at Interstate Park in New York City June 12-15, 1900.

    He was part of the victorious American team in the June 1901 Anglo-American Clay Bird Match using a Parker. He started 1902 shooting a new Remington single trigger hammerless, then used a LC Smith at the Ohio State shoot and to take 3rd in the last GAH at Live Birds in Kansas City.
     
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  8. TractorMan

    TractorMan perazzi and john deere TS Supporters

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    Yes you have joined Trapshooters.com and jumped on a very respected members thread and stated that you have news:

    Drew has farted away more trapshooting knowledge than you have--how is that for news.
     
  9. spitter

    spitter Well-Known Member TS Supporters

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    I was still in diapers, but one of the more interesting threads to come across... you can't move forward, if you don't know where you came from...

    Thank you...
     
  10. dickgtax

    dickgtax Well-Known Member

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    I was.more interested in the "Pull" column which had a piece about the old Lincoln Park Gun Club in Chicago where I shot for many years. Talked about a squad of skeet shooters setting a world record, four of whom I knew. Though it was best known for the big skeet shoots, it also held the Chicago Grand trapshoot. That shoot is still held, but at different clubs in the Chicago area.
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2017
  11. alpsstuff

    alpsstuff Member

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    Great reading. History is important to any activity for it to survive.
     
  12. SPORTALLURING

    SPORTALLURING Well-Known Member

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    F. D. Kelsey... one of the shooters that shot in the first Grand American.
    His last Grand trophy that he won before his death...
    Sportalluring

    S5003271.JPG
     
  13. slide action

    slide action Well-Known Member

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    I hope the admins ban you for your drivel! Drew is much respect and SA nonsense from twerps like you is certainly NOT needed here. Got over to some yuppie smart mouth site where you belong!
     
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  14. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

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    Last edited: Aug 22, 2017
  15. kolar4931

    kolar4931 champion midget wrestler Banned

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    Slide,
    He sounds like a coward azz demorat snowflake.
     
  16. SPORTALLURING

    SPORTALLURING Well-Known Member

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    Some of the Greats... 1899 Madison Square Garden. Fanning, Crosby, Budd, Woodward, Heikes...

    Sportalluring
    1899 Madison Sq Garden FanningCrosbyBuddBWoodwardHeikes.jpg
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2017
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  17. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

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    Wow. What a find!
    Jack Fanning (Smith), W.R. Crosby (Baker Paragon), Charles Budd (Parker), B. Leroy Woodard, Campello, Mass., (Remington), Rolla Heikes (Remington)

    In Feb. 1898, Budd received on consignment a Parker $400 AAH Pigeon Gun SN 87449 with 30” Whitworth barrels F/F and 2 7/8” chambers. LOP was 14” and DAH 2 1/4” with a pistol grip stock and no safety. It weighed 7# 12 oz.

    Budd was part of the victorious American team in the June 1901 Anglo-American Clay Bird Match using a Parker.
    The British trap shooters, in recognition of the victory of the American gunners, arranged a special contest for the visiting team for the British Presentation Cup. It cost forty guineas (about $200) and was the largest shooting trophy in the world. After two days of shooting, two Iowans, Fred Gilbert and C. W. Budd were tied at 23 out of 25 targets. In the shoot-off Gilbert won as Budd broke 7 out of 12 and withdrew.

    He later shot for U.M.C. and used a Remington C.E.O. Trap. In 1906 he was shooting a Remington Autoloading Shotgun, as was Rolla Heikes.

    With your permission I'll add that image here
    https://www.trapshooters.com/threads/national-sportsmens-association-exposition.211437/
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2017
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  18. SPORTALLURING

    SPORTALLURING Well-Known Member

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    Morning Drew... might just be the consigned Parker Pigeon that he is holding. Yes, a nice addition to your Sportsmens association thread...

    Sportalluring
     
  19. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

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    Last edited: Aug 1, 2020
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  20. Bob Hamilton

    Bob Hamilton Well-Known Member

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    A very nice DuPont trapshooting image from an early cover:

    IMG_0724.jpg

    A little information on Chas. H. Perdew from the Charles Perdew website (charlesperdew.com):

    "Charles and Edna Perdew of Henry, Illinois, combined their talents to become famous folk artists in Central Illinois and throughout the rest of the United States. They produced thousands of examples of
    painted wildfowl sculpture, originally purchased mainly by hunters to attract ducks, geese and crows to within shooting range.

    Charlie was born near Henry in 1874 and was a hunter and carver of decoys. Edna was born in 1882 in Henry and their marriage in 1902 formed an artistic partnership that lasted almost sixty years. For much
    of that time, Charlie carved and Edna painted from their home and workshop in Henry. Charlie Perdew died in 1963 and Edna survived him until 1974.

    The story of this remarkable couple and their artistic legacy has been beautifully portrayed in the book "PERDEW: An Illinois River Tradition " by Ann Tandy Lacy and published by David Galliher in 1993.
    Copies of this book can be obtained through the museum."