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My son just went from glasses to contacts. He has prescription shooting glasses. Am I better off getting him non prescription lenses or have him take contacts out and shoot prescription lenses?
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Absolutely stay with the contacts and use plano lenses in shooting glass frames.
Consider: the contact corrective prescription is right up against his eye....with prescription lenses, there is a small but actual distance between his eye and the corrective lens which likely distorts the image ever so slightly. I used contacts for years until I had cataract implants. The contacts worked fantastically well! Plano tinted lenses are less expensive, too.
 

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I started wearing contacts in 1972. Had LASIK in 2000. Five years later, went back to contacts and started with glasses about 7 years ago after LASIK. Correction is very minor compared to before LASIK, because LASIK cured my astigmatism and I no longer need a toric lens. I am more confident, less stressed and think my contacts are better than glasses for shooting, driving, etc. When wearing contacts, I do not have to move my head to catch movement such as a clay target.
 

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Absolutely. Grab a set of non RX lenses if you're able. There seems to be some debate as to which offers a clearer solution to vision. I've had doctors preach contacts are the end all, and others say that you'll never see as clear out of them over glasses, as the focal point is easier to achieve over a larger surface area. Personally, i feel as though I see better with contacts. My issue is that I don't wear them daily due to convenience of glasses and my eyes dry out very fast. This is even worse since I choose to wear RGP contacts (hard lenses),and they physically change the profile of your cornea.

Why go this route? I have an astigmatism :rolleyes:

Long story short, grab some non rx lenses or, have him try on a plain set of shooting glasses if you don't want to take the plunge and let him decide what he likes.
 

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Another + for contacts... Rx lenses are expensive and require change as the Rx script changes. Contacts change one variable and you can keep the existing plano lenses

Being older, my contact's script is all distance. I have astigmatism and its corrected for. I keep a bottle of eyedrops if my eyes get dry.

He 's wearing contacts... give him a plain pair of shooting glasses and see how he does...
 

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I’m a contact lens wearer for close to thirty years and shot with uncorrected colored lenses until meeting with Frank Rively.
I have a slight astigmatism that Frank corrected for in my shooting lenses and it helped darken and sharpen the targets when I was examined at Elysburg years ago.
The downside is if the astigmatism changes, you’re in the same boat as shooting with prescription lens. If not, well you know what plain vs prescription lenses cost. Ten years later I’m still in his same lenses. I’m not endorsing Frank, but depending on your sons eyes, he may need seen by someone who knows more than your vendors row lens seller.
 

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What an interesting thread. I’ve worn glasses since I was in my late teens. I considered contacts, just never made the move. By my early 20’s I was on the fire department. Since I was the chauffeur, and I might need to get out of bed and see to drive, I wore my glasses.

Now a few years post retirement, ya got me wondering if I should finally do it.
 

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+1 on contacts, the only downside is seasonal allergies, can cause more itching, discharge, lens movement, than RX. Depends on how severe his prescription is. If the correction is very small Rx glasses are fine. With a big RX you can’t even find shooting lenses that thick, and things look much smaller. Peripheral vision much better with contacts.
 

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I assume two eyed shooter?

Personally, this is something each person should try for themselves. Obviously, there is so many different variables as far as cost, comfort, prescription changes, colored lenses, etc.

Seeing as you already have the shooting glasses, is your color selection limited, or are they inserts? Shoot with the contacts and borrow some colored lenses to shoot with. See which combination works best for all conditions.

My problem is I only wear contacts once in a while. Glasses for me are better the majority of the time because I can not see far or near. Carrying cheaters around with the distance contacts is a hassle. Astigmatism and multi focal lenses don't seem to give me clear vision either way. My right eye is my dominant eye, and the multi focal works ok in that eye. It does almost create a double image on a moving target sometimes. Maybe it is the combination of both eyes.

Prescription glasses to distance only I see the target very clearly, and for me are best. Comfort wise, prolonged contacts wearing gets uncomfortable, and the boogers in my eye corners the next morning are much worse.
 

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I’ve shot using contacts for over 40 years. The “one use” lenses I use are so much improved since me first ones. I use Johnson and Johnson “Accuvue Moist, with “Lacreon” lenses and they are the most comfortable contacts I’ve ever used. I only use them for shooting and one box usually lasts a whole season. Good stuff.
 

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Absolutely stay with the contacts and use plano lenses in shooting glass frames.
Consider: the contact corrective prescription is right up against his eye....with prescription lenses, there is a small but actual distance between his eye and the corrective lens which likely distorts the image ever so slightly. I used contacts for years until I had cataract implants. The contacts worked fantastically well! Plano tinted lenses are less expensive, too.
The vertex distance usually does not cause any distortion. On Rx's where it might, the actual vertex distance is measured and the Rx is adjusted for it. The base value labs use for vertex when not specified in fitting is 12mm. The Rx usually has to be above + or - 8 diopters before the vertex needs to be moved from 12mm.
 
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