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Stock Refinishing

4332 Views 33 Replies 15 Participants Last post by  teleskier
I do 15 to 20 stocks a year for the last 25 years so here is my method. First strip all the old finish off using a stripper agent, checkering and all. Mask off any plastic that you can't remove. Sanding is very important at this point, if dings or scratches are present sand them with the grain, carefully! I use 220 down to 400 wet or dry to remove all scratches. If it is a Franchi it is european walnut and usually hard enough you don't have to raise the grain with water and heat. Next decide on stain or not, that's up to you. If you do use good stain that penetrates and seals. Let dry for at least a day. I then mix tung oil and mineral spirits about 70/30 tung oil. Soak the wood and wipe off at least 2 times in a day. This will further seal the wood. I then start with Tru-Oil, follow directions(hint:use sparingly). Add till you're happy then let dry for 72 hrs. For gloss rub it down lightly with compound for satin use more compound. Work till you're happy. Let me know if you get into a snag. ftlupton
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zzt, since you have to cut some of it to fit you might as well remove it all. If it's the typical Perazzi finish it's a urethane and is stripped with any commercial stripper.

Do yourself a favor when you refinish it and use the Chem-Pak products listed in Brownell's that I mentioned above. They have both a rub on material and a spray can. They both contain tung oil and urethane.

I refinished my Perazzi with them and got a much better than factory finish.

Pictures please when you finish.

Smash Em,

Jerry
 

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I spoke with a stock maker a few years ago... He used linseed oil and a few drops of Japan drier to create his own finish. Linseed oil alone takes forever to dry ...adding Japan drier speeds up drying time and creates a reddish colored finish. I have tried it once a few years ago on a Winchester model 50 trap.... looks fantastic.

Thin coats, wait a day in between coats then sand with 600 grit. Do it again till the finish becomes like glass. Incredible looking reddish hard oil finish.

Anyone know where I can find a checkering tool that will match the pitch on a Perazzi and also what degree the pitch is on a Perazzi?

Thanks

Raffaele
 

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ftlupton- I did the same process you used but with different material. When I was doing a lot of woodwork and some stocks on the side, I had 55 gallon drums of lacquer, lacquer filler and lacquer thinner in my shop. I would allow no more than three hours maximum working time for one stock. The three hours were spread over three days. I would sand between coats and after the final coat, rub the finish with very fine steel wool. That was the only time steel wool touched the stock. I did my final buffing with fine automobile rubbing compound. The rubbing compound was applied lightly to a very soft 8 inch buffing wheel. I then applied some water and liquid furniture wax to the wheel, chucked it in a drill press and buffed. This made a great mess when I turned on the drill press. One minute of buffing would do the stock, two minutes would cut through the finish. My finish did come out with the high gloss "plastic" look, not the soft oil finish look you prefer. We went through the same basic steps to end up with a different type of finish. I also believe we went through the same learning process that takes some time.

Pat Ireland
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
We have learned the old fashioned way by trying many different methods and I hope it will save some younger ones some time. I also hope they get the hours and hours of enjoyment I have had over the years. Salute to you.
ftlupton
dick ogle
 

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Joe- The only way I was able to take care of the checkering was to rechecker the stock after finishing it. Checkering is fun. If you clean the checkering with a stiff tooth brush and some wax/thinner compound first, then sand with great care and use a finish that is applied with your hand or a rag, you might get a nice finish without recheckering.

My finish system involve spraying the stock, including the checkering and then recutting the checkering. Most of the used stocks I did needed the checkering recut. On a new stock, I would finish the wood and then checker it after the finish job.

I liked to use several coats of sander sealer that could be sanded 45 minutes after application to fill the pores and a final finish that could be sanded about 1.5 hours after application. This technique resulted in a thicker layer of finish over the wood similar to a factory finish. I was never a big fan of the thin layer of an oil finish that was in the wood and not on the wood. That finish looks very nice but does not offer a real good protective layer over the wood. It also takes a lot of time. I have done it on "show guns" but for a gun that gets a lot of heavy use, my personal preference is for a heaver finish on top of the wood. The only factory guns I am aware of that do not use a heavy finish over the wood have a retail price of $25,000 or more. They are looked at much and used little.

Pat Ireland
 

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Joe, The few times I have tried to mask off an area I was always left with a ridge at the edge of the masking. You could try it and perhaps the final polishing might get rid of the ridge. I would polish the final finish with a large, soft wheel in a drill press. Does a great job and makes a great mess.

Pat Ireland
 

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ftlupton or Pat,

What do you use to strip off the old finish?

I have a field Ithaca 37 stock that I am going to work on to make the stock prettier, and I plan to put an oil finish on it.

Is there any way to get the old stain out?

Tim
 

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Eddie,
I have found that rubbing alcohol and clean paper towels do a remarkably good (and quick) job at removing the dirt, perspiration and hand oil from this type of finish. I go through a number of paper towels and use the alcohol pretty liberally. This will leave the stock a bit dry so you'll want to apply another coat or two of tung-oil afterward. I've done this many times with excellent results. There was a thread about a month or so ago on this very subject but I can't seem to find it. There are a couple of other excellent suggestions on there as I recall, if you are able to locate it.
A quick word if I may on "tung oil". It is not all the same, or at least not the way it is often marketed. The most reliable place to purchase it may be a specilty woodworking store in a container that says "pure" tung oil. There are a number of products out there that are mixes of tung oil and perhaps varnish or lindseed oil. These will often dry to a glossy finish, which is fine if that is what you are looking for, but pure tung oil dry's pretty much to a flat finish. An example of the 'non-pure' type is "Formby's Tung Oil Finish". It dry's to a gloss and I suspect that it is a tung oil/varnish mix. - Michael Gregory
 

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Or brings out the woods natural beauty as well. I've also long thought Tung oil was under-rated. I've always heard that there is no oil finish that will 'bite' deeper into the wood. Then you can easily clean it like this, apply another coat or two and have it look like new - can't do alot better for gun that's used every day! - Mike
 

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This thread has me wanting to do some work. I am not a wood person so I don't know how to describe the finish on my Rottweil. If anyone knows that would be great. Anyway, all I want to do is "shine" it up. What can I do for that?

Mike
 

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Mike- I would first try using automotive paste wax. Put some in the checkering area and use a worn tooth brush to scrub out the area. Follow the existing checker lines. Then coat the entire stock with the automotive wax and see if you are happy with the job.

If you want more, you could lightly remove some surface scratches with 0000 steel wool and then polish with an automotive rubbing/polishing compound. Use the finest grit possible. This procedure can be a little tricky and lacking some experience, you could really mess up things.

Pat Ireland
 
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