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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently purchased a Weatherby Orion 20 gauge grade 2. This is a Japan made gun...Miroku I am guessing. The gun is in excellent condition other than the wood finish being crazed and is checking. I decided to refinish the wood. I disassembled the gun and slathered the wood with Citristrip. I let it sit on the stock for 24 hours. The stripper did absolutely nothing. It did not lift the finish at all. I am not sure what type of finish was used on these guns...but it seems pretty impervious to chemicals. Internet searching is saying that removing the finish on this era of Weatherby rifles and shotguns is a problem. I even tried some brake cleaner....did not even touch it. It appears that only a couple of years ago there was a chemical in paint strippers called methylene chloride that was banned for use in paint strippers in the US. Since then, paint strippers really don't work as good as they used to. I don't want to sand it because this gun has fairly large patches of checkering and detail work. In the past I have chemically stripped wood stocks and refinished with Tru-oil with great results. Any ideas? Thanks in advance. Don
 

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You can buy Methylene Chloride yourself and give it a try. Home Depot, Amazon, etc.
Not hard to find, but I can’t speak to its effectiveness on those plasticized Weatherby stocks.
 

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Try scoring the finish with extremely coarse sandpaper first. Just a bit. If you can barely cut through the finish in a few places it allows the stripper to work its way under the finish and is much more effective. Good luck.
 

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I’ve done one once and vowed never to do one again.

Start with a drywall sanding screen an get into the finish, coat with the citristrip and wrap in plastic, give it plenty of time as in days.

Repeat the process too many times.

I was using brass brushes and custom cut pieces of aluminum flashing material as scrapers to get under the finish and scrape it away.

If I had it to do all over again I’d find a good furniture refinished and pay them to strip it for me, they usually have tanks of good and nasty stuff.
 

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You used to be able to buy a stripper from Brownells that works, Maybe still can. You can buy Jasco epoxy stripper at Ace. I wrapped the stock with the stripper on it in Al foil for a day at a time. Several times. Not sure the Methylene Chloride works on epoxy but I stripped my stock back when it was still in strippers. But all in all it is a bear to strip some of these finished. Never worked on that one. I have heard that the aircraft industry has some strong strippers for epoxy. Maybe a Sherwin Williams auto paint store, Or a auto paint shop.

Is there any chance that you have not hurt the finish enough to have to continue?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I made some calls and sourced a friend that has about a quart of the old MC formula of paint stripper. I masked off the checkering and broke the gloss of the finish with some 180 grit sand paper.......hoping to open up the pores and allow the stripper to penetrate the finish. I won't have my hands on the stripper until later this week. If this does not work I have found a couple furniture restoration places in the area......I might have to check with them for plan "B".
 

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Try a stripper that works for epoxy. There is a Jasco product that claims it will strip epoxy. Kleen Strip has a similar product.
 

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Yes, the good stuff was banned. Apparently people did not take the warnings seriously not to use for stripping bathtubs. No idea why someone would strip a bathtub, but the fumes were causing people to pass out because they remained beneath the bathtub edge. When they passed out they died because they did not have ventilation.

I used the old stripper and that worked faster. Like mentioned above, the Jasco and Kleen-Strip extra strength will remove it, but like also mentioned above you need to keep it wet, and have to wrap with plastic wrap. Keep applying it, whenever you go past it and re-wrap. Eventually it will soften enough to use a putty knife to dig into the finish. This will take a day or so. Once you get some areas down to the wood, re-apply and wrap some more. The stripper will start to work from behind around the edges where you are now to the wood. The key is to keep it wet! It will start to lift off in some areas which can be scraped off easily. I use the sharp edge to get the first cuts in, then a dull edge will buckle the finish after if softens enough. Be careful not to gouge the wood.

It takes sometimes days to get it done. You can't just apply the stripper and expect it to fall off like latex paint.

I then wash off the wood with a soft bristled brush with soap and hot water, making sure the water does not get in the bolt hole. More than likely you will have to bed the receiver again.

Was this enough information to change your mind because it is a PIA to do? There is a reason why refinishing gun stocks is expensive. Finishing the wood is only 20 percent of the battle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I spent 26 years as a Auto body repair technician....hard work, attention to detail, and patience is the life that I live daily. I consider working on my guns as being relaxing and somewhat therapeutic. You want an expensive PIA?.....I have a GTO sitting in my garage....did most of the restoration work myself..... ten years and $30,000 dollars later it is winning best in class awards. I am confident with some good advice from good people on this site I will have no problem completing this stock restoration with good results......but I think I will skip the "scrape it with a bowie knife"method.:18:
 

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I have a Weatherby Orion made in Japan. The stock finish is hard like a bowling pin. Also from my aviation days, I think if you use a stripper designated for use on two part aviation finishes you may see some good results. But to warn you, it is definitely an outdoor project and with a respirator and eye protection as well. It is nasty stuff and you'll need chemical resistant gloves as well. Good luck if you want to continue your diy project.
 

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C-Class Wannabe, you're the perfect guy to be doing this type of work. Your background puts you way ahead of most of us. I've had the best luck with that Weatherby finish using epoxy stripper followed up with 0000 steel wool soaked in MEK and scrubbing. I do suggest you look into the scraper idea because it can save you a bunch of time and you already know better than to dig an edge in. The key with the scraper is to use it while the finish is still a bit soft from the stripper. Good luck in your endeavor.
 

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You might try aircraft stripper but be very careful as the stuff is hostile and will burn your bare skin bad in a couple of seconds. However, it will dissolve any finish that you might have on a gun stock including epoxy tout suite.
Aloha
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I will have my hands on the old formula stripper in a couple days...I will see what happens and post some pictures of the results.
 

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I've used Jasco with good results. Got ahold of a stock and forearm awhile back that just wouldn't strip. Hardest finish I'd ran into. Ended up getting a quart of certistrip from Brownells. Took a few hours but it finally softened the finish enough to scrape it off with a putty knife. Defiantly want to wear gloves though. Burns if you get it on you. If your stock has a gripcap I would keep it away from it and sand if possible.
 

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Sounds like 2 part epoxy like others said use screen type drywall sandpaper fairly course to rough up the surface avoiding the checkering. I pour enough stripper into a foil roasting pan to completely cover the stock and then seal it with aluminum foil and let it sit overnight. I use the jasco product. Even the new version seems to work. Back edge of an old table knife works good for scraping. Definitely an outside project and use chemical res. Gloves.
 
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