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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

I'm in the process of building a custom stock. Right now I'm knocking together the try stock. I've hit a bit of a snag when it comes to a moldable putty that dries hard and won't flake or chip or rub off while shooting.

I've tried the Elmers wood filler putty in the past. Its a great consistancy and is easily molded. However, when it dries its very soft and breaks very easily.

At one of my local clubs there was a gentleman that was also having a stock made. His stock had a pinkish colored material that is perfect for what I want. But he has no idea what it is.

Does anybody have any suggestions on a material I could use for this application and where can I find it? BYG
 

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Mix a little course sawdust in with it, you will find it will be a lot easer to work. Alternate two colors of hardner ( usually pink and blue) also gives you an idea of how much you have taken off or how much more you need to take off.
 

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Whatever they had at the local auto parts store. Didn't know there were different kinds.

I developed molds to pour into out of cereal box cardboard and lined them with plastic. In spite of the weird look, this stock fit me the best of all.







 

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Joe, that is the exact material I'm looking for!

Do you have a picture of the container? I want to make sure I get the right stuff.
 

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Sorry about the size. This online picture matches the can I have left over. I'm betting what they have at your local auto parts store will work even if it's a little different.



 

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I used Bondo also. For making a palm swell, just put on a latex glove, spread Bondo in the palm of your hand and then grip you gun stock and wait till it hardens. It's a good starting point, then you can add or remove to suit. Can also make finger grips than same way.

Willy
 

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The regular Bondo is good for smoothing and finishing. But it's chalky and can be too weak for a structural build...it may crack and flake off. All Bondo is heavy and enough of it will affect the weight and balance when you may be mostly after dimensional changes.

For a really large build-up I scab on pine first, to keep weight down and save money. Then I fill in with Bondo. For any application thicker than 1/4" or so, I prefer the "short-hair" fiberglass stuff, followed by the regular for smoothing. That's especially true if the Bondo is permanent and I'm going to paint it. But I learned it's a good idea for pattern making as well. It cures so fast you can apply it and rasp it 15 minutes later. Took off too much? Apply more and rasp again.










 

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I have used bondo on many socks that were used as try stocks to be duplicated. Very easy to use and sand, just don't forget to cover the stock with masking tape before you put it on. Regards Joe
 
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