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have never seen one. How do they work and about how much does it cost to have a stock done to the unfinished stage. Needing finish sanded,checkered and finish coated.
 

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Here's one of many videos on YouTube. I've been considering such a machine for about a year now.

 

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My son has one. They can be fickle to set up correctly, especially if the spindles and rods aren't perfect.
And a lot of hand work I assume?
My interest is (of course) trap stocks.
My biggest question is drilling the bolt hole. Seem's like that would be almost the first step cause you screw that one up and it's all over.
 

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My biggest question is drilling the bolt hole. Seem's like that would be almost the first step cause you screw that one up and it's all over.
I've seen some videos of guys using a lathe to cut the bolt hole. Seems like a pretty good way to do it.
 

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Even if your duplicator is right on the nuts, there's plenty of sanding involved. It's a bitch to glue wood back on. You'll tend to be too careful, which means more sanding.

A very sturdy self made jig is used to drill the bolt hole. Semi autos are easy. Side locks and plates....not so much.
 

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It's a horizonal pantograph. I've seen old Remington pictures of them with 15 spindles. I built one off plans I bought off the internet about 10 years ago. It worked fairly good, cost me maybe $150 in materials. The biggest issue was making sure the stylist and the milling cutter were lined up perfect with each other, and the spindles were lined up perfectly with the cutter and stylist.
 

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This is the fastest, easiest, and most accurate way to do it. Also the most expensive. I should have tried it when I had my shop and the equipment but I was too busy making a living.

 

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I've seen some videos of guys using a lathe to cut the bolt hole. Seems like a pretty good way to do it.
The best way to do it. Chuck the drill/forstner bit, and feed the wood into the bit. No drift, and direct center after changing bits. Works better than forcing the bit into the wood with a drill press.

Best duplicator was a Don Allen, Dakota Arms. Hard to find one, and not many of them out there.
 

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Interested in having a stock duplicated, drilled and semi inletted at a fair price. Any recommendations?
I can finish and send out to be checkered
 

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The problem I see with the pantograph method is that the stock is made in reverse. By that, I mean that the blank is shaped before it is inletted. I was taught that the inletting (heading up) should be completed first, before the outside shaping is begun. The reason is that a shaped stock that hasn't been inletted leaves no room for error. If the receiver is misaligned just 0.05" after inletting, that could throw the butt end off as much as 1". With extra wood to work with, that can be tolerated since the typical blank is 2.5-3" thick whereas the finished stock is about 1.5" at the butt. It's not fun to mount the receiver and barrels into the stock and then draw the center-line onto the comb and find that it's off. Don't ask me how I know.
 

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The problem I see with the pantograph method is that the stock is made in reverse. By that, I mean that the blank is shaped before it is inletted. I was taught that the inletting (heading up) should be completed first, before the outside shaping is begun. The reason is that a shaped stock that hasn't been inletted leaves no room for error. If the receiver is misaligned just 0.05" after inletting, that could throw the butt end off as much as 1". With extra wood to work with, that can be tolerated since the typical blank is 2.5-3" thick whereas the finished stock is about 1.5" at the butt. It's not fun to mount the receiver and barrels into the stock and then draw the center-line onto the comb and find that it's off. Don't ask me how I know.
For rifle stocks the action and the trigger guard/magazine cuts where the stock has to be rotated 180⁰ great care must be taken to make sure the alignment is right. A little bit of misalignment on the long axis is a near disaster and any misalignment in the rotation is worse.

There is a custom rifle shop that has a duplicator here. If you buy one of their mistakes, not done accurately enough for their shop, it will be closer to tolerance than having the shop duplicate a stock for another rifle builder, they have ruined more wood for competitors than they have made workable stocks.
 

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This is the kind of thing where paying the man could be the right answer . Have someone who does it for a living do it . By the time you invest in all the equipment it will likely be more money than having a pro do it.

maybe someone here knows someone
 

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Wad, I owned and used the Gemini in the past. We had all the attachments and extensions, even made rifle stocks with it. It's da best in my opinion, and once you learn how to set it up its quite simple to use. Obviously you still have to hand fit the metal and finish sanding the stock but, with experience you can get it 90% finished out of the duplicator. I used to duplicate a stock and forearm in a day, and finish the project in a couple of weeks. I am sure you have one of those helmets with the holders for 2 beers and the tube to drink from. All you need to do is attach a full plexi shield to it and get busy. Those walnut splinters are painful. Of course you need to buy wood too. I have a good friend over here who understands my Brooklyn accent and has da best blanks around on my side of the country.
 

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The two best gunstock duplicators that I know of, are the Hoenig and Rodman, and the Don Allen machines. These are precise gunstock duplicators which will make a 95+% inletted stock.
Needless to say, the best machine still needs a demanding workman.
Lower priced, general use wood pantograph machines are capable of rough stock shaping work, but are not the tool of the professionals.
 

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What squad am I on?
Lots of different guns...
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Lower priced, general use wood pantograph machines are capable of rough stock shaping work, but are not the tool of the professionals.
You mean to tell me that Rich doesn't sit in a back room with a duplicator and his tongue sticking out of his mouth?
 

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Some stockmakers of my acquaintance have tried a cheap duplicator, not being able to pony up the big price of a professional machine. I saw nothing but frustration.
You cannot be a slapdash workman with the best of machines. There's lots of fussing, figuring and cussing in the duplicator room. You need a good dust control room for these things.
 
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