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Hi everyone. Looking to see if there's a universal torque spec for stock bolts. There should be.
There's torque values for most everything else. Snug isn't good enough for me. Thanks. Dave T.
 

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As one doofus I used to help with his race car would tell me when I asked, "Adequate." :eek:
 

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Need more information. What size? Fine or coarse? Metric or SAE? Dry threads, or lubed/coated? It all makes a big difference. An 8 mm metric, coarse thread, dry, would be about 10 ft. lbs. Six mm would be about half that.
 

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Unless the manufacturer has a torque listed for various bolts, you could use the universal standard for that particular bolt. Just google the size, pitch, grade of bolt and the chart should come up. If that doesnt work, use German torque........."Goood-n-Tite"
 

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Likely the above poster meant 5 ft/lb (60 in/lb). This is about what one can tighten a bolt with a standard screwdriver with one hand.

Ruger specified this value for their Red Label shotguns.
 

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5 finger tight


The amount of torque you can put on using just your 5 fingers(not the palm of your hand). A mechanic I worked with loved to tell you how many fingers was required to torque the fastener. It was his method. I find myself still doing that.
 

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5 finger tight


The amount of torque you can put on using just your 5 fingers(not the palm of your hand). A mechanic I worked with loved to tell you how many fingers was required to torque the fastener. It was his method. I find myself still doing that.
Snug and a little more.
 

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Beretta 391's specify 8 ft lbs. After getting mine back from a reputable smith, found the stock to be coming loose at a 3 day tournament. Was lucky it did not crack. This gun has a nylock nut on the recoil spring tube to hold the stock on. The nut has resistance when tightening, even before it snugs up against the stock shim. Make sure You are tightening the bolt/nut aganst the wood of the stock or stock shims!.
 

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This question brings up a very important, and often overlooked, point, especially with Perazzi stocks. We all have seen Perazzi stocks that have that ever present "hairline crack" either at the top tang, or the bottom where the receiver tightens to the wood. This is invariably linked directly to one of two things: 1) Stock bolt over tightened, causing the receiver to move too far back in the wood, or 2) Mounting a different stock on the gun that didn't come with the gun and doesn't fit properly. In severe cases, you can actually crack and split the "cheeks" of the stock when tightening the stock bolt too much. The correct fix to prevent this happening to your stock is to glass bed the receiver and stock to one another. Any stock man, or gunsmith, can do this for you at a very reasonable price. Every gun I own has the receiver glass bedded into the stock just for that reason..... Just my experience
 

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Absolutely the most important part, is what Dan said above, IMO. If the stock is bedded to the receiver, the force is equal all around with no pressure points. Then a tight stock, will stay tight with not much force. You can feel the stock is just right when it is snug, but not over-tightened. These pressure points are what causes cracking, and chipping, in most all situations.

All stocks should be bedded to the receiver, IMO. Even if the original wood is mated very close to perfectly, that still allows pressure points to exist, even with different hardness within the wood blanks themselves. Which would be the reason most cracks follow along grain lines, I would think.
 
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