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Anybody recommend good videos on shooting sporting clays? I seem to miss at the same stations every time, such as springing teal. Thanks.
 

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Speaking of the springing teal, I missed a lot at first, finally figured the best place to break it is when it almost reaches the top, it'll slow down at that point. Never wait till it drops.

The one I miss most is the one that crossing down hill into the valley.
 

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Save your money........get some gun speed while catching the target, find the target and pull through, and fire.........there you go......how to break the springing teal.

Lyle
 

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Easy to break at the apex, but you can also just cover it up and smack it, gun speed will give you the lead. True pairs, shoot the first one that way and the second at the peak.

HM
 

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Dan Carlisle's "Secrets of the Triangle" shows shooting springing teal
going up, at the apex, and falling. He prefers a target moving either up
or down. One thing I have noticed of Dan and all Master shooters,
"They have absolutely no fear of a falling target, such as a teal".
Many times they will wait for targets to fall. Gary Owen
 

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You should be able to shoot it on the way up, at the top, and on the way down. That way the timing isn't as critical when that target is thrown as a true pair with another target.

Personally, I find them easiest to hit falling. The speed and the line are constant and you can see the target the whole time. If you try to shoot them at the top, you're guessing at where the top is gonna be. If you shoot them on the rise, you can't see the bird at all and are relying solely on your line and gun speed. I need three points of consistent reference to shoot my best consistently.
 

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Gil say you should practice breaking it at three different places. You sweet spot, when it is fast rising, and when it is falling.
 

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Teal are the easiest sporting tragets for me (I miss plenty others!).
The 3 ways I shoot them, all pre-mounted.

One the way up:

Hold 1/2 way between the break point and the trap. Off to one side slightly so you can see the bird. As the bird catches the barrel, match the speed for a second then pull out in front and pull the trigger. Do NOT let the bird get ahead of the barrel. Remember, stay right on it for an instant or so, THEN pull out in front. (pull away method)

At the Apex:

The easiest, its really a matter of shooting where the bird will be just before it gets there. Point at the apex, back off about 6-8 feet down the line (not too far), as the bird approaches the barrel stay right on the it. Just BEFORE the bird gets to the apex, pull the tigger shooting right at the back/bottom edge of the bird. Your follow through/reaction time will give you a very very slight lead and is all thats needed. Remember the bird is at a dead stop for a split second. If you miss, bet your shooting over it. (almost a pull away method)

On the way down:

Hold a few feet under the apex, as the bird starts down, stay ahead of it by 2 to 3 feet, matching the speed and line. As the barrel gets to your chosen break point, pull the trigger. Again DO NOT let the bird catch up to the barrel, maintain your lead. You can break it easily at any height using this method. Happens alot on true pairs where you have to shoot the other bird first. (maintained lead method, my favorite for 80% of targets)


Do not ride the bird for very long on any of these shots. Will always miss doing that, really no matter what the presentation. Easy as pie...right :)

Mark

p.s. If you're not sure of what 3 feet looks like. For MOST sporting target distances, its about 3 times the barrel width between the barrel and the target. Thats the way I see it anyhow. That will get you in the ball park. For videos, Bobby Fowler Jr., I like how he explains things and uses high quality eye cam in slow motion so you can see exactly how he shot things. Many of the others are too zen-like. (feel the bird, feel the lead stuff). OSP-Gil & Vickie Ash..if you have not learned how to load your gun yet, they are good. :) I have never figured out how in the heck they stay in business.
 

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The best coach in the business (because he's my coach!) is Anthony Matarese, Jr. His video, Timed to Win, is excellent, long and detailed if you are serious. He was coached by Dan Carlisle and employs a lot of the same elements as Dan.
 

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I had a lesson from Dan Carlisle and Anthony Materese was also giving
lessons, so I invited to ride along and watch Anthony's course. Dogsnhorses
is correct that both teach the same concepts. Their styles are different,
but over dinner and breakfast I found that both deeply believe in the same
principles and are both very positive and supportive to you, thier student.
My lesson with Dan was very enjoyable, but be prepared to work intensely.
Gary Owen
 
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