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I've been watching a ton of youtube videos lately with some pros. And from what I have seen nearly all of them pull the gun slightly off their shoulder between shots and then remount. Now most of the guys I'm watching are British and I know they come from a low mount after the the first clay is thrown. I think I remember reading that was because of he rules they have there. Regardless, is a slight remount common? It seems like it would be more efficient to keep the gun solidly mounted to get on the second shot quicker. Curious on the mentality behind the 2nd shot slight remount.
 

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Most sporting clays shooters start with a "soft mount," gun up to the shoulder but not up to the face. This allows the shooter to visually pick up the clay without the gun in the way.

The best way to address a report pair (where the second target is released at the sound of the first shot) is usually as two separate shots. Coming slightly out of the gun, back to the soft mount, after the first shot allows the shots to be more similar in terms of move, mount, shoot.

There is no NSCA rule that requires this. Even in FITACS, where the gun has to be held at least 25 cm below the top of the shoulder until the target is visible, there is no required move or hold between shots of any pair of targets.
 

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I believe the most common reason is to see the next target. Not all targets have the same presentation. Having the gun fully mounted may interfere with seeing the line of flight and given the variables of target presentation a second “quick shot” may not be best. As an aside, once SC became organized the original rules called for a low gun position. That lasted until scores became more important that the game.
 

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Like everyone else says, it's purpose is to give the shooter a less obstructed view of the second target which can be lower or higher than the first shot. Unlike trap doubles, where the second bird is pretty much always higher than the first bird and at a known proximity. You may also notice that most of the top shooters will pull the trigger within a second of remounting the gun.

That's why gun fit is important.
 

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If a shooter thinks he's more successful using a low gun mount for the first shot, then why wouldn't he be more successful with a low gun on the second shot ? A friend and I both do it. Not that we're Master class shooters but it just seems more natural to do it that way. You don't really loose all that much time by pulling the gun off your shoulder and face just a bit. Clayton Rue, a level III instructor in NSSA, had a nice article about it in their March 2018 CTN magazine. One of his premises was that you could move the gun faster if it didn't touch the shoulder. Once it touched the shoulder one had to move the back to keep aligned with the bird. Off the shoulder, then the hands moved the gun which was quicker. One phrase he had was " did you ever hear of good eye back coordination "? No. It's good eye hand coordination. Something to think about.
 

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Six or eight years ago when I shot a lot of skeet with a gun down mount I found myself getting the gun caught on my heavy winter clothing. To alleviate the problem, I would push the gun out toward the bird as I moved with the bird. For me, a good by product of that was I was moving the gun on the same line of the bird as I mounted it. My scores went up. I just carried it over to SCs.
 

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Regardless, is a slight remount common?
No, I've Never Even Seen Anyone Do This. Since Sporting Clay's consists of All Report Pairs, and True Doubles!!! When would someone have the time to remount his gun between shots, without reloading? There are No Single Shots in Sporting Clays!!! Some shooters do lower there gun slightly between shots. They almost always keep the stock tight in there shoulder, when they do this though. This is a personal thing, and has to do with Target Acquisition. Of course these shooters run the risk of remounting poorly on the 2nd shot and missing targets. Only "YOU" can find out what works for YOU!!! What I do, may not work for you? There is always a Balance in everything you do. break em all Jeff
 

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Listen to Dr. Mike. I can only hope the International target makes it over here. I think a faster target that holds speed better would be neat.
 

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No, I've Never Even Seen Anyone Do This. Since Sporting Clay's consists of All Report Pairs, and True Doubles!!! When would someone have the time to remount his gun between shots, without reloading? There are No Single Shots in Sporting Clays!!! Some shooters do lower there gun slightly between shots. They almost always keep the stock tight in there shoulder, when they do this though. This is a personal thing, and has to do with Target Acquisition. Of course these shooters run the risk of remounting poorly on the 2nd shot and missing targets. Only "YOU" can find out what works for YOU!!! What I do, may not work for you? There is always a Balance in everything you do. break em all Jeff
Are you German? You're capitalization of letters reminds me of germans.
 

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Before I gave up competing at sporting clays in the UK towards the mid-1960s because cheating was so prevalent, everybody started from a "gun down" position as far as I recall, the targets being released when the referee considered you were ready, i.e. you were not allowed to say "Pull!"

At the British Open held at the West London Shooting Grounds at Northolt there was a simulated driven grouse layout. You stood in a replica grouse butt with the gun down and engaged a low fast approaching target passing slightly to your left, then you had to take your gun completely out of your shoulder elevating the barrels straight up in the air in the process while taking a step to turn around to your left, remount your gun and shoot a target that was sailing away straight behind you. This replicated shooting a "right and a left" at grouse just as you would on a grouse moor without pointing your loaded gun at your imaginary neighbor in the next grouse butt along the line.

What you're allowed to do when shooting sporting clays these days I've absolutely no idea. We always shot sporting clays just as you would when shooting game birds, pigeons and rabbits. Nobody ever shot starting with their gun in the shoulder or even as high as allowed in FITASC sporting.

Learning how to mount your gun properly and gun fit were necessities that were taken for granted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks for all the awesome info and feedback. I liked the explanation given about being able to track the second bird faster without having to move your back, just hands. Makes sense!
 

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The short answer is this depends entirely on target presentation. When timing and target trajectory allow, most sporting clays shooters prefer to initially set up “off the gun” in the form of a soft mount or even FITASC mount so that they can better see/acquire the first bird.

On a report pair with lots of time some shooters like to lower the gun slightly or raise their heads slightly after the first bird so they can better acquire the second target. In my experience this does not mean returning to a low gun or FITASC mount after killing the first bird. It is more of a subtle move that will become natural with practice.

Obviously on quick report pairs or true pairs it is usually necessary to stay mounted.
 

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I've been watching a ton of youtube videos lately with some pros. And from what I have seen nearly all of them pull the gun slightly off their shoulder between shots and then remount. Now most of the guys I'm watching are British and I know they come from a low mount after the the first clay is thrown. I think I remember reading that was because of he rules they have there. Regardless, is a slight remount common? It seems like it would be more efficient to keep the gun solidly mounted to get on the second shot quicker. Curious on the mentality behind the 2nd shot slight remount.
When I started competing in 1988 there were 2 organizations, NSCA & USSCA. I believe their rules back then were gun down.

Since I was a kid I always shot targets in the gun down position even Skeet so gun down for Sporting felt normal. I've even shot Trap gun down in practice & it was fun!
The only game I've ever tried that required gun up was Star Shot. That was a challenge for sure!

I don't remember when Sporting changed to mounted gun but I tried it & could never adjust to it. I've always dropped the gun slightly for report & true pairs. It just feels natural to me.

A lot of clubs throw doubles now that absolutely require a premounted gun to address targets before they go behind a barrier or other obstruction. To me Sporting clays have been changed to where I don't enjoy it like I used to.

Everyone is different when it comes to shooting Sporting but I like the British way of shooting.

i_shoot
 

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When I started competing in 1988 there were 2 organizations, NSCA & USSCA. I believe their rules back then were gun down.

Since I was a kid I always shot targets in the gun down position even Skeet so gun down for Sporting felt normal. I've even shot Trap gun down in practice & it was fun!

I don't remember when it changed to mounted gun but I tried it & could never adjust to it. I've always dropped the gun slightly for report & true pairs. It just feels natural to me.

A lot of clubs throw doubles now that absolutely require a premounted gun to address targets before they go behind a barrier or other obstruction. To me Sporting clays have been changed to where I don't enjoy it like I used to.

Everyone is different when it comes to shooting Sporting but I like the British way of shooting.

i_shoot
Yes, it used to be a low gun game, but the only way that they were going to attract more shooters was to allow pre-mounting. That came into effect around 2002, if I recall.
 
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