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Looking for opinions on this .22 long rifle. Are they reliable? How's the quality? Thanks
 

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Got one for my son a couple years ago and it's holding up just fine. Is a good trainer for when he's ready to step up to an AR-15. And it's a ton of fun too!
 

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Another vote for the 10/22.
It's fine, just the way it comes, but there's an extensive inventory of after market support for anyone who wishes to go further.
 

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Might want to also look at a ruger 10/22 u can pick them up new for around $200
A 10/22 and an M&P 15-22 are nothing alike at all. The M&P is based on the AR platform. Both are fine guns, but no where near interchangeable as far as form or function.

On to the topic
I have heard nothing but good things about the M&P. They seem to function and hold up well. Nothing more fun than an AR in .22lr. I have a Tac Sol upper on a billet lower that I built. Lots of fun.
 

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What squad am I on?
Lots of different guns...
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When looking for a .22 upper for my CORE15 I came across the Chiappa M-Four .22 For less than the price of most conversions, I bought a mil-spec M4, poly but feels great, very solid with a decent trigger and shoots accurately, an absolute blast to shoot. Reviews are pretty good. I've since replaced hand guard, stock and removed front sight, carry handle and replaced it with the cheap scope that's on the CORE in the picture.
Im sure the MP15/22 is an upgrade from this one but trap's my main shooting interest so dropping a bunch on a plinker wasn't a priority.
IMG_2588.JPG
 

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I have a 15-22. It is accurate. Part of why I made that decision is because the lower will accept an upgraded trigger just like any Mil Spec AR. I know it sounds silly to drop a $300 two stage trigger in a $500 rifle, but competition is like that.

About three years ago, I did have the extractor fail, well actually a part flew out and got lost. I called S&W, they issued a return tag and repaired it with improved parts at no cost, including covering the shipping. I have had no problem since then.
 

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Some food for thought while making your decision:

S&W 15/22 Banned From Appleseed Events After Catastrophic Failures

S&W 15/22 Banned From Appleseed Events After Catastrophic Failures


A warning was issued recently to the Appleseed Instructor forum. The popular 15-22, made by Smith & Wesson, is temporarily banned from Project Appleseed events nationwide after issues involving out of battery discharges occurred at numerous events.

The following email was sent out to Appleseed instructors regarding recent reports of potentially dangerous malfunctions:

Outdoorhub Writes-
To: All Appleseed Instructors
Subject: TEMPORARY BAN ON SMITH & WESSON M&P 15/22 USE AT APPLESEED

EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY, THE USE OF SMITH AND WESSON M&P 15/22’S AT AN APPLESEED IS HEREBY BANNED UNTIL SMITH & WESSON FORMALLY INVESTIGATES THE PROBLEM AND ISSUES AN OFFICIAL CORRECTIVE ACTION. THE AOC WILL NOTIFY THE CADRE WHEN THIS BAN IS LIFTED.

The AOC has received a rash of reports regarding safety issues with the Smith & Wesson M&P 15/22, including a shooter getting injured as a result of an out-of-battery discharge (see reports below).

As responsible Instructors, we have a duty to maintain safety at our events. If we know a rifle to be potentially unsafe, we shouldn’t allow it on the line at all.

At this time the least risk course of action would be to exclude the Smith & Wesson M&P 15/22 from future events until Smith & Wesson formally investigates the problem and issues an official corrective action.
________________________________________

REPORTS TO BE AWARE OF:

Bowie, MD: A shooter (RHS) firing a M&P 15/22 with Remington 22 Thunderbolt Ammo had an out of battery discharge. A Metal Fragment hit the arm of a shooter next to her (LHS) in her right arm. She, did not realize that she had been hit with fragments at first and continued to fire until blood begin to pool (time est. 11:10am) feeling only a warm sting. Instructors rendered first aid applying a compression type bandage to stop the bleeding. Shoot boss suggested that she go to local hospital or emergency clinic. She was able to drive herself to the hospital. They took x-rays of the area and found a fragment deep in her arm. Hospital suggested that she see an Orthopedic surgeon or her Doctor on Monday to have the object removed but surgery should not be required.

Casper, WY: This past weekend we had a student show up with a 15/22. She had been using it pretty regular, since she had also attended our recent boot camp. After about 8 sets of squares, she began to notice the malfunction. Upon careful observation, it was noticed that as she reset the sear the rifle would discharge. We called cease fire and immediately removed this rifle from the line, and replaced it with a loaner.

Once off line, it was field stripped and upon inspection, found that not only was it firing at reset, but also when the safety was engaged. Further inspection found that the trigger pin and the hammer pin were both loose. They both had moved about 1/16th of an inch to the right. Just enough to be loose on the left side of the receiver. The pins were gently hammered back in and function checks performed. After about 3 sets, the hammer pin slid out again.

The rifle was reassembled and tagged out, student was told that 1) the rifle needed to be seen by her gunsmith; or 2) (my recommendation) sent back to the manufacturer for repair/replacement.

Michigan Senior Instructor: The SI wanted to shoot an AQT with his 15/22, but he needed to verify the zero. Another instructor volunteered to take the rifle over to another range, put it on a bench, and confirm zero. While shooting the first string, after pulling the trigger, the extractor shot out the ejection port along with the case and the extractor spring. The case was retrieved and it was observed to be split down the side, indicating that the rifle fired out of battery. Fortunately, the instructor was alone on the range, and no one was injured. The rifle was sent back to S&W, and it was repaired and returned. A copy of one page of the manual was enclosed, highlighting the need to keep the rifle clean and only use certain types of ammunition, insinuating that the problem was operator error, not a design flaw. The Senior Instructor sold the rifle shortly thereafter.

Michigan Instructor: “Back before I was more familiar with this model, we had a malfunction of the Extractor during an event – it simply fell apart during a course of fire. I took it to Williams and they said it needed to go back to S&W. To save time I just bought a new extractor, springs and dowel pins and replaced them myself. Tested it and it worked fine, that’s until it malfunctioned again after several hundred rounds down range.

As the old saying goes “two is one and one is none” – I had purchased several extractors, springs and dowel pins – replaced it a second time and it worked fine all up until I had a “Run-Away…” Luckily I had the muzzle pointed down range as it spit out the balance of 30 rounds down range without the need to have a finger on the trigger….

I contacted S&W and they sent me a repair tag and shipped it back to them. Upon its return I noticed that they replaced the hammer, sear and all the springs were replaced with “Blue” springs. The rifle performed well the after that but I never brought it back to an Appleseed. It now sits in the vault as an expensive club.”

Montpelier, VA: I’ve witnessed out-of-battery firing and squib from M&P 15/22’s twice but never from a 10/22.

While no one is certain of the exact cause, we are sure the team over at Smith & Wesson is on top of this and investigating the situation thoroughly. In the meantime, please remember to wear eye and ear protection and follow proper range etiquette.
 

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While I do not discount any of the above statements from the Appleseed people, I do think it is a bit of a knee jerk hysteria.

I have been shooting semi auto .22 rifles and pistols since the mid 1960's. Just because Montpelier, VA has never seen it, does not mean it dors not happen, I have seen it. A person does not have to shoot very long before you get a failure once and a while. I have had out of battery discharge with a lever action, when I would try to shoot it as fast as I could. Mossberg, Colt, Ruger, Marlin, Remington, High Standard, Ruger, Winchester, it really does not matter. I have owned them, and still have most of them. We are talking about 2 cent (used to be) a shot RIMFIRE ammo, getting shifted around at speed. Misfires, out of battery, and case ruptures are far more common with the bottom shelf ammo. Since the semi auto actions are recoil operated, and there is a HUGE difference in recoil with .22 ammo every weight, balance and spring tension of the mechanism is a compromise to try to make it function with all of them. Cheapie ammo has a huge difference even in the same box.

While on the line at a Military training, there would be an occasional out of battery with an M-14. No one went silly and banned that rifle. An Armorer was called, and another rifle issued and the suspect rifle was sent to the shop for repair. I have had an M-16 blow up two stations over during prone fire training, and got hit with pieces of aluminum.

There is always a small degree of risk in the shooting sports. The Appleseed course of fire has people shooting pretty close to each other on a firing line, of course that puts the people on the right of them next to the ejection port. I think what compounds the hysteria is that people are trying to be proactive against litigation. It is a little .22, not a hand grenade. None of the rifles have exploded the plastic housings, so how much energy could be there.? How many blown up shotgun pictures have we seen posted on this site? And those have exploded steel barrels actions and splintered hardwood. Yet we are not hearing a ban against those shotguns. Wear your safety glasses and ear plugs and accept the miniscule risk. You can avoid all gun risk by staying home and playing video games, only to die of heart desease, diabetes and bed sores.
 

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I had one of the first ones out. Probably put 15K thru that gun in three years. I beat the hell out of it, shot it fast and a lot and did not clean until it began to malfunction. I have both Rugers and other M&P 15-22 and both are nice and reliable guns. The SW is easy to take apart and clean. Would not hesitate to buy another at anytime.
 

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Other than playing make believe 'I'm a spec op guy', I don't really see the attraction to these AR style .22lr guns. But the market says they are really popular so obviously I am not speaking for all shooters. I am pretty confident that my pet 10/22 Deluxe model with its stock Ruger barrel will perform as well as any of these new plastic fantastic plinkers but will also admit to having trained that old 10/22 extensively over the past 20 years so obviously I am going to be biased on this.
 

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Other than playing make believe 'I'm a spec op guy', I don't really see the attraction to these AR style .22lr guns. But the market says they are really popular so obviously I am not speaking for all shooters. I am pretty confident that my pet 10/22 Deluxe model with its stock Ruger barrel will perform as well as any of these new plastic fantastic plinkers but will also admit to having trained that old 10/22 extensively over the past 20 years so obviously I am going to be biased on this.
I never was what you would call "attracted" to the M16 platform. My background included being a multi state competitor in DCM/CMP service rifle championships and serving on the State team at the National Championships. When I started, we still had the M14 chassis rifles and the older men were allowed to stay with their M1's. When service men started using the M16 chassis rifles, they were not really competitive, at least on the 600 yard targets. Then the AMU and Marine Corp armorers got to work and figured out how to make them shoot. Between the armorers, the barrel companies and the bullet makers, they overcame the short comings. The updated rifles are dependable, accurate and long lasting. Unlike M14's or my bolt action rifles, the yearly barrel change can be done at home with nothing but a 1/16th pin punch and a big pair of channel locks. Now, pretty much every competitor uses them. I use the 15-.22 for a winter smallbore league to stay with the same chassis to be consistent. My Anschutz will outshoot it, but that gets used for a different game. The younger generation has only used the M16 chassis, so it is comfortable for them.

Other than shotguns, the old school "fine grade" guns are no longer in style. To show the younger generation a genuine Roy Weatherby rifle or a mint condition Colt Python and all you will get is a dis interested shrug of the shoulders. they will not even look at them, let alone pay market value. It hurts me to say, but some day Perazzi, Beretta, Kreghoff and Caeser Guerini guns will be stacked at the back of the rack and no customers even wanting to look at them. Times change, people change, I just make sure to enjoy what I have each day, knowing someday it will no longer be special.
 
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