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Most shotguns have terrible triggers, too heavy, lots of creep and lots of over travel. Almost anything would be an improvement. HMB
 

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I had an occasional "hesitation to fire" and considered a release until Harlan Campbell suggested that I get the trigger in my XT worked over to see if that helped. I had Laurence Pylinski massage it. He took the pull from 7 pounds down to 3½ pounds with a break that's as crisp as a pretzel stick. The hesitation went away completely. No need for a release.

MK
 

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Steve...get Gary and Larry to convert your trigger to a release... I have shot one of theirs and some others as well and i believe that the Alfermann release is the fastest....You won't be sorry with an Alfermann release

krieghoff200....Steve White
 

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I'll tell you real soon. Sent my action out to Phil Crenwelge this morning. Never had the problem when i had my release on my previous gun.---Matt


NSXER---Pretty interesting article. Good reading for believers and non-believers of release triggers.
 

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I tried a release in one of my guns. Not only did it not help, it really caused trouble. I actually flinched really badly for the first few shots.

That's just one shooter's opinion.

What I would like to do is spend some real time with a quality release. The release I have is not a high quality one and there is a little creep on the release. I just haven't convinced myself that the $600 or more will really help.

Then there is the issue of having to convert all my other guns...
 

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I love a release but don't try to go back to pull---Stay with a pull as long as you can---There is no where to go after you go to the release and I know some that developed a flinch with a release---JMT---SJB---
 

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I had Gary put a release in my Silver Dollar Special. I had been flinching for years, first with my Bowning XT, then with my Krieghoff KS-5 Special, and finally with the Alfermann. When Gary put the release in, my flinching went from maybe ten in a one hundred shot match, to none. I'm not a great shooter, I don't shoot enough, but the flinching was ruining my enjoyment. My scores have gone up a little, I'll probably never be a champion, but now I'm back to enjoying shooting.
 

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Leo said he may go to a release but only if he can't work his way through his present problem. 100 singles, 100 from the 27 on one day and 95 in the doubles the same day, same conditions - flinch? Maybe.

I know some who cannot set the trigger with the gun open, shut, or pull the trigger. What can they do?? Many set the trigger with the gun open, then can release it when they see the target with the action closed.

There must be an answer. Personally, I can shoot with either, but I also can have a terrible flinch pulling, as well as a minor flinch releasing!! Backing off the "horsepower" of the shells may help?????????

merlyn
 

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merlyn,

I doubt the "horsepower" of the shells has much to do with it. At least not for me.

If recoil caused flinching, a release trigger would not help us.

It really is a mental thing.

Don Verna
 

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I have a bad flinch. Cannot shoot any gun without a release. I recently purchased a used Kolar T/A (was somewhat disappointed to find out what "T/A" really stood for), but knew I couldn't shoot it without an installed release.

I have heard that it takes dozens - perhaps scores - of muscles to pull a trigger. Maybe this is why so much of your upper arms, shoulder and neck can ache after 300 or 400 rounds. Only takes three or four muscles to let a trigger go. Don't have any ache with the release, so it wasn't recoil creating the bunged up muscles after shooting. Can someone with a neuro background confirm/deny this?

FWIW. ;-)

Steve Oehmen
 

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Back in the mid 80's, a friend of mine and I went to a 500 bird marathon at the Airport Gun Club in Lancaster, Ohio after returning from the Southern Grand. My singles average at the time was 92.74. When we got to the 500 marathon, I was undecided on what gun to use as this was my first marathon (I had taken my 1100 and my Citori Combo). He suggested that I shoot his Perazzi TM1 that he had just purchased at the Midwestern Grand the year before with a Bowen release. I had never shot a release prior to that day.

I went to the line (I lead off) and proceeded to break 23 on the first trap. From there I missed 2 out of the next 450 and then (getting excited) I missed two out of the last 25 for a total of 494 out of the 500. I shot a release from that day on and my average went from the 92.74 to 93.11 and then to a 96.04 when I got that TM1 from my friend. I also went from the 21 yard hdcp to my current 25 in a two year period. I didn't shoot much after that point but I really feel that it helped me at least a target or two on my average. I was just beginning to flinch maybe one or two targets per hundred when I tried the release for the first time. Maybe it is my mindset, but I had no issues going bird hunting and using a pull trigger after using a release after a few years on the trap line.

Jeff
 

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" Only takes three or four muscles to let a trigger go"

Its my understanding that when operating a release, it is a simple relaxation of the same muscles you used to set(or pull)the release trigger to start with. The difference between squeezing/pulling on a target and relaxing/releasing on a target is the supposed difference in ease of use and perhaps accuracy.---Matt
 

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Bear in mind that there is more than one cause for a flinch. Some shooters have a recoil flinch, while others will suffer from a timing flinch. The first one occurs when the shooter senses the pounding they may receive upon pulling the trigger, and the "little man" inside us does not want to pull the trigger due to that fear. The second occurs when the gun must fire by a certain point in time, or the "flinch-monster" takes over control of the shot. There could be more than those two causes also.

Learning to safely operate a release trigger is not difficult, but a double release; well let's just say that can be a whole different experience altogether.

Good luck.

Jon Reitz
 

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I have switched to a release with no appreciable benefits. However I will occasionally dry-fire on a thrown rock and notice that my flinch is thru my support arm on the forend, generally pulling the muzzle down a bit. I may be anticipating the shot, and it may be a result of years or shooting heavy rifles, but I certainly do not conscienously dread the recoil or noise.
Go fig'ur.
dju
 
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