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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought a used Beretta 682 back in december, it has a 34 inch mono barrel, adjustable comb and a add-a-rib installed. I have been toying with the idea of doubles, skeet and sporting clays, got a head of myself and bought a set of the first set of 28" sporting barrels i found. I know I should have held out for 30"+

I'm confused as to what I should do to get this set up for duel purpose. If i drop the comb With the 28" barrels, I see too much of the rib. Using g a laser I can see the barrels are a good 6-12" above my hold point.

Here are the options I'm considering.
1. Purchase an add-a-rib to match my trap stock so i have minimal (if any) adjustments to make. approx $200

2. Purchase a sporting stock and have it fitted for the sporting barrels. $400+

3. Purchase an additional 682 receiver and stock for dedicated skeet / sporting clays setup.

Any other options I should consider?
 

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Option 1 sounds the least expensive but you should experiment with a balsa wood rib to get the dimensions just right before getting the add-a-rib. Option 2 might be easier to accomplish provided the comb is adjustable. 4th option is not cheap but you could sell the 28" barrel set and get another gun with 30" barrels.
 

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I suggest you keep what you have and use it. My first 682 Sporting was bought in the middle 80's at a store north or London and it had 28" barrels. It worked fine for everything since it had screw in chokes. I own and shoot a bunch of different guns in all gauges and all action types and all barrel lengths from 26" to 34". Barrel length makes no practical difference at all. It's really what's in vogue and the ideas in some people's heads that make the difference. I sold it to the son of my college roommate and I have wished many times I had it back.

Johnpe
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I suggest you keep what you have and use it. My first 682 Sporting was bought in the middle 80's at a store north or London and it had 28" barrels. It worked fine for everything since it had screw in chokes. I own and shoot a bunch of different guns in all gauges and all action types and all barrel lengths from 26" to 34". Barrel length makes no practical difference at all. It's really what's in vogue and the ideas in some people's heads that make the difference. I sold it to the son of my college roommate and I have wished many times I had it back.

Johnpe
I still intend to shoot it, infact want to shoot it more hence; my dilemma.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Since your mono barrel has an add on rib, I'd do the same for the O/U barrels also.

HAP
Would I set up with the comb up or down? I would assume up incase I shoot trap doubles but how does that affect skeet or SC?

Did I mention that I still need my inertia trigger fixed before I can successfully use the o/u, it's not switching between barrels.
 

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I'd bet most folks find a Monte Carlo or parallel comb most comfortable on an all around gun...IIRC, Wenig went with this idea for their New American stocks. If you do decide to go with a sporting stock, pay to get it fitted to your gun so it won't crack. You'll also likely want an adjustable comb to raise/lower between trap/skeet and sporting.

Personally, I'd just get an add on rib...but you can probably get one cheaper than $200. I think I have a brand new adjust-a-rib (you can raise/lower it in the front and rear to adjust the amount of rib you see) that would fit if you're interested. I'm out of town till this weekend and would have to make sure I still have it though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I'd bet most folks find a Monte Carlo or parallel comb most comfortable on an all around gun...IIRC, Wenig went with this idea for their New American stocks. If you do decide to go with a sporting stock, pay to get it fitted to your gun so it won't crack. You'll also likely want an adjustable comb to raise/lower between trap/skeet and sporting.

Personally, I'd just get an add on rib...but you can probably get one cheaper than $200. I think I have a brand new adjust-a-rib (you can raise/lower it in the front and rear to adjust the amount of rib you see) that would fit for about $140 shipped if you're interested. I'm out of town till this weekend and would have to make sure I still have it though.
Thanks. Feel free to PM me pictures and contact info.
 

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mpolans is right, if you are American, and started as a trap shooter.

Many sporting shooters I know use sporting stocks (similiar to a non parallel skeet stock), but they never played the trap game much. And their face barely touches the comb. They have developed their style on that comb configuration, and it works. We trapshooters have that "glue your head to the stock for consistancy" mentality.

Due to all the odd/weird bird presentations, it's not nescessarily required on sporting. FWIW, I take out 3 shims for sporting on my doubles gun (which is 10" POI at 30 yards) and 5 shims for from my O/U singles gun (13.5" at 30 yards).

But that's me....not the gospel!! jar, your gun stock is not set up for a flat rib barrel. I'd sell the 28" barrels and buy a 30 or 32" with the same rib configuarion as your top single and go from there.
 

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Yep exact same thing. Keen sights built me a rib to match the heigth of my single barrel rib so i dont have to monkey with changing my comb and buttpad plate around
 

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You've already experienced the pain of "getting ahead of yourself" and investing money in equipment before you have a clear idea of where you're headed. Been there, too. Were it me, I'd make a new comb out of a piece of pine 2x4. Doesn't need to be adjustable, just rasp and sand it until you get a flat picture over the rib...voila...a custom clays stock for $4 instead of $400. Get it shooting near 50/50 and head to the clays course. You'll learn whether you like the game enough to invest $$$ in a different stock, different barrels or even a different gun.

I made a pine comb for a buddy who experimented with an unsingle for an entire year before deciding to go back to an auto.
 

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You've already experienced the pain of "getting ahead of yourself" and investing money in equipment before you have a clear idea of where you're headed. Been there, too. Were it me, I'd make a new comb out of a piece of pine 2x4. Doesn't need to be adjustable, just rasp and sand it until you get a flat picture over the rib...voila...a custom clays stock for $4 instead of $400. Get it shooting near 50/50 and head to the clays course. You'll learn whether you like the game enough to invest $$$ in a different stock, different barrels or even a different gun.

I made a pine comb for a buddy who experimented with an unsingle for an entire year before deciding to go back to an auto.
You'd probably be better served by buying a dedicated sporting gun which
you can also use for skeet.
 

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Can you use a dual purpose gun to duel?
 

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You'd probably be better served by buying a dedicated sporting gun which
you can also use for skeet.
Provided you already know that you like and plan to shoot those games and/or have a firm idea of what equipment you want. The OP already has buyer's remorse over the 28" barrels....the good news is, he didn't buy a dedicated 28" gun first. Sometimes it pays to have an easy exit plan.
 

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j119, there are a couple of things you have to consider. First, you have to decide what POI you want for the unsingle. Since you have an adjustable comb that's easy. If you already have it set, you are good to go. Then you must decide what POI you want for doubles, sporting and skeet. You want a flatish shooting gun for those sports. 60/40 to 70/30 are what most shooters prefer for an all-around gun. If your unsingle is set up to shoot higher than that, it's okay, but will affect the height of your new rib.

Assuming you would like to be able to swap barrels without readjusting your comb every time, you'll have to establish what rib height you need to gice you the O/U POI you want with the unsingle comb setting. This is not as simple as measuring the distance from the center of the unsingle barrel to the top of the rib and duplicating it for the O/U set. If you did that, the POI on the O/U would be considerably higher than for your unsingle. The reason is the great disparity in barrel lengths. To exactly match the POI of your unsingle with 28" barrels will require an even taller rib. If you've set your unsingle to shoot higher than you want for the )/U, even more rib height will be required.

miketmx's suggestion to use a balsa wood rib to find out what height you need is a good one. That is exactly what I did, except I used small, square brass tubing from the hardware store. You only need a piece about 6" long. I held mine on with rubber bands, along with the fiber optic front sight. It is an easy and inexpensive way to find out what rib height you need for what you want to shoot. BTW, you don't have to have a full rib installed if you decide on one. A half rib is less expensive and offers a lot of advantages. One is you'll pick up the target a lot faster than you will with a full length rib.

BTW2, there is nothing wrong with 28" barrels. If they are a tad too light for you, consider long, extended steel choke tubes. That will slow down your swing. If it were me, I'd leave them alone. You want to be moving faster with the O/U barrels, especially for sporting and 5-stand.
 

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ZZT is on point. I use pine or fir painted black and attach with electrical tape. For new shooters working on gun fit this has helped dial in the rib height\taper and configuration that works for them.
Comb hardware is usually not made for multiple adjustment take downs. Tiny screws only go in and out so many times.
You are not out any if you decide to sell the barrels. They are in demand and will not last long on a for sale site.
Experiment with what you have and see if you can get close before you make another buy on a longer set or a whole gun.
 
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