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Need your thoughts on Scent protection hunting for whitetails---I'v hunted them for yrs and had my share of luck without any scent lock,but I notice there is alot of hunters using it and I wonder if there is a greater sucess rate---It seems like alot of work---You have to bag the clothes---Keep them outside and not in the cabin,ETC.---Is it worth it?--- I note there is scent lock soap---shampoo---hairspray---deoderant---Never had any of that stuff in the old days---Have the deer gone to school since then?---Thanks---MYSTIC
 

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I have used the scent blocker for years..I just usually spray down before I go into the woods.. I have tried everything from putting my clothes in plastic bags full of pine needles to letting them hang out side on the porch all night.. truth is.. if they come in downwind they will smell something.. I built a shooting house and never worry about the smell now.. good luck..
 

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I do use a spray on scent blocker and always have a bottle of turpentine which I spray on my boots. Down wind is inportant but I had a buck to walk right in and under me and never gave me a look and the wind was not in my favor. LOL It is hard to figure out sometimes. Jackie B.
 

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I've never bothered with scent blockers, but I do use one of the special scent killer laundry soaps for my hunting clothes. Mainly because regular laundry detergent has perfumes and UV brighteners in it. I also use unscented Mennen Speed Stick (and have for years because the scented kinds give me headaches). Other than that, I take no particular precautions for deer hunting. The deer here (blacktails) don't seem to be overly bothered by odors, unless you're really obnoxious about it.

There have been reports of bears, though, alarming at the smell of tobacco on clothing (no problem for me since I've never tried it.)

Also, if you are hunting older, experienced coyotes, you need to really think about scent control. Those recently weaned are kind of clueless when it comes to scents. But the older, wiser ones will definitely circle and try to pick up scents. Some have narrowly escaped hunters, and are trying not to repeat that mistake. I've found that dipping a q-tip in skunk essence will help throw them off, since it overpowers human scent and while stinky, skunks are not something for a coyote to get alarmed about.

BTW, for some reason your thread is in the political section. I first thought this would be about the stink of politicians.
 

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A few "old timers" around here smoke their hunting clothes up with smoke from a wood fire. They say because so many homes around here heat with wood, the smell is natural to the deer.

I've used the scent free soap while bear hunting, and kept my camo in the back of the truck with the bait. Now that I think about it, that may be why a few times I had to swat small bears out of my tree.

Doug
 

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Just get a few sent pads soaked with "doe in heat" and lace them to your boots.
Bucks won't give a damned about any other scent when they get a wiff of it.
Find some scrapes, load'em up with a few sent pads, stay down wind, real easy.
Don't smoke or let anyone smoke around your clothes. Don't wash your cloths in scented laundry detergent. Add a cup of baking soda to the rinse water.
I think that the ol' clothes in a bag with pine needles is also a good trick.
 

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Putting doe in heat scent on yourself is NOT recommended. Watch the video.
 
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