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Rusted doors on trap houses tried a can of Rust olem heavy rust primer

1557 Views 19 Replies 13 Participants Last post by  Steve12
The doors on my 9 trap houses sat in the dirt for many years. Is this a waist of time. I am the only one repairing the fields. Spent the last year getting pat traps operating. Long way to go.
Steve
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You have to get ride of the cancer or it will come back. Rustolem will slow the process some what but won't stop it
 

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I am assuming it is a phosphoric acid compound - A strong reducing agent it will 'reverse' the oxidation causing the rust.

Knock off the worst scale. Brush the stuff on and let it sit for a day or three. Bad rust might need a second application. Once you are happy with the conversion process (it typically turns black) you need to clean off the excess converter (rags, water, etc.), let it dry and then you can prime it and paint it.

It is actually quite hard to find now because it is considered a hazardous material so shipping is a pain.

A general discussion - Formulation for phosphoric acid Rust Converter
 

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I have a little practical experience with the product HSDLS mentioned. He is spot on. It's a better option than most but it still just slows down the inevitable. It will last longer than just a primer. I'm only guessing but I feel that some of the rust is in the metal and the acid can't get to it to convert it. Eventually Mother Nature does her thing and you're chasing rust again.
 

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I read about it
Do you know anyone who has used it
Steve
A lot of guy in my online camper group use it on trailers, some also use the Rustoleum rust reformer.
Probably depends on how long you expect them to last after treating them.
 

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Stop whipping a dead horse! Replace crappy rusted door with heavy 2x12" door frame then cover with 3/4" marine plywood secured with brass screws supported by 4 large brass hinges and paint all surfaces even bottom of the door good and heavy with a quality acrylic latex!. end of your rust problem, as you do it right this time for the next generation of shooters to use and enjoy and maybe even remember you by.
Aloha
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Stop whipping a dead horse! Replace crappy rusted door with heavy 2x12" door frame then cover with 3/4" marine plywood secured with brass screws supported by 4 large brass hinges and paint all surfaces even bottom of the door good and heavy with a quality acrylic latex!. end of your rust problem, as you do it right this time for the next generation of shooters to use and enjoy and maybe even remember you by.
Aloha
Only in the islands
Great advice. They are about 20 years old.
Now I just need to get them to stop shooting at me when I stand out there.
Steve
 

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Sakbooknut had a good idea, but we found products that worked better than anything else we had tried.
I sailed in some pretty old ships with one outfit, mostly war time construction or shortly after, and they had never been properly prepped for paint, nor had they had anything more than "chip, scrape, red lead, undercoat, finish coat" treatment. One ship had a vertical winch back aft that received a ton of work, and the paint wore off the ribs of the drum, exposing bare metal, which rusted quicker than we could prep and paint. Between the ribs, huge rust bubbles would grow seemingly overnight.
We found that needle gunning the whole drum down to bare metal, using a wire wheel to remove any tiny bits of paint, then starting the cover treatment was the only way to get ahead of the rust.
We first used a vinyl wash product on the clean steel, which is just like it sounds; an acid based liquid with a vinyl component added. The acid etches into the steel and the vinyl bonds into the steel as the acid dries. Next, we used one coat of zinc chromate primer, which seems to bond to the vinyl better than anything else. Then we used two (thin) coats of red oxide primer, an undercoat, and a finish coat.
I left that outfit after doing a bunch of deck gear as I described, and years later ran into the mate from that vessel when he came to the company I was working for. He told me that they had never had to redo the vinyl wash/zinc chromate job on any surface, just touch up paint that chipped or wore, and they had no rust problems on anything treated with the system.
The vertical winch was on a very wet quarterdeck, and when I saw the ship tied up in retirement years later, It still had no rust on the drum.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Sakbooknut had a good idea, but we found products that worked better than anything else we had tried.
I sailed in some pretty old ships with one outfit, mostly war time construction or shortly after, and they had never been properly prepped for paint, nor had they had anything more than "chip, scrape, red lead, undercoat, finish coat" treatment. One ship had a vertical winch back aft that received a ton of work, and the paint wore off the ribs of the drum, exposing bare metal, which rusted quicker than we could prep and paint. Between the ribs, huge rust bubbles would grow seemingly overnight.
We found that needle gunning the whole drum down to bare metal, using a wire wheel to remove any tiny bits of paint, then starting the cover treatment was the only way to get ahead of the rust.
We first used a vinyl wash product on the clean steel, which is just like it sounds; an acid based liquid with a vinyl component added. The acid etches into the steel and the vinyl bonds into the steel as the acid dries. Next, we used one coat of zinc chromate primer, which seems to bond to the vinyl better than anything else. Then we used two (thin) coats of red oxide primer, an undercoat, and a finish coat.
I left that outfit after doing a bunch of deck gear as I described, and years later ran into the mate from that vessel when he came to the company I was working for. He told me that they had never had to redo the vinyl wash/zinc chromate job on any surface, just touch up paint that chipped or wore, and they had no rust problems on anything treated with the system.
The vertical winch was on a very wet quarterdeck, and when I saw the ship tied up in retirement years later, It still had no rust on the drum.
My dad did a lot of that in the Navy
 

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Sakbooknut had a good idea, but we found products that worked better than anything else we had tried.
I sailed in some pretty old ships with one outfit, mostly war time construction or shortly after, and they had never been properly prepped for paint, nor had they had anything more than "chip, scrape, red lead, undercoat, finish coat" treatment. One ship had a vertical winch back aft that received a ton of work, and the paint wore off the ribs of the drum, exposing bare metal, which rusted quicker than we could prep and paint. Between the ribs, huge rust bubbles would grow seemingly overnight.
We found that needle gunning the whole drum down to bare metal, using a wire wheel to remove any tiny bits of paint, then starting the cover treatment was the only way to get ahead of the rust.
We first used a vinyl wash product on the clean steel, which is just like it sounds; an acid based liquid with a vinyl component added. The acid etches into the steel and the vinyl bonds into the steel as the acid dries. Next, we used one coat of zinc chromate primer, which seems to bond to the vinyl better than anything else. Then we used two (thin) coats of red oxide primer, an undercoat, and a finish coat.
I left that outfit after doing a bunch of deck gear as I described, and years later ran into the mate from that vessel when he came to the company I was working for. He told me that they had never had to redo the vinyl wash/zinc chromate job on any surface, just touch up paint that chipped or wore, and they had no rust problems on anything treated with the system.
The vertical winch was on a very wet quarterdeck, and when I saw the ship tied up in retirement years later, It still had no rust on the drum.
Nothing like a response from the man who actually did the work.
(y)
 
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