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I visted the Beretta offices and factory in Maryland a few months ago. They showed me prototypes of a carbine being tested and I heard about a low-recoil autoloading shotgun under development but no small-gauge shotgun. In fact, they gave me one of the recoil reduction devices the low-recoil gun will utilize to try in my 687 combo and I can tell that it really works. I had a 682 combo owner shoot his gun and my gun with his shells and he could not get over the difference - and he was a lefty shooting a gun set up for a right-handed shooter who needs a lot of offset, so my stock was nowhere close to fitting him.

Ed
 

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They were considering making the 303 in 28 ga at one time per a Beretta employee. It got shelved about the time they bought Benelli. I would be standing in line for one.
 

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28 gauge autos have a problem. Expensive ammo and they toss the emties. Reloading takes the sting out of shooting 28. Tossed empties frustrate reloading.
 

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Yes they do toss the empties - but they sure are fun to shoot!

I absolutely love my Remington 1100 Sporting .410 gauge.

Jim Skeel

P.S. I am looking for a 28 gauge Remington Sporting
 

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Speaking of 410 1100s, I was looking at an 870 410 Wingmaster. Unlike the current 1100 version, the pump does not have screw in choke tubes. I don't understand why not. The 870 410 Wingmaster does have a mod choke, while the Express version has a full.
 

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The best way I can describe it is a larger version of a Dead Mule. It's not a Dead Mule product but works like one in that it has a spring-loaded weight that moves back when the gun bottoms out against your shoulder and is then propelled forward, "pulling" some of the felt recoil with it. It's roughly twice the length and diameter of a Dead Mule, which adds to its effectiveness as the weight being moved is heavier. I honestly did not weigh it before I installed it but it is not real heavy - six to eight ounces, I suppose.

Obviously, installing one in a gun stock will require a lot of room, especially length-wise. Beretta stocks are roomy as they have what appears to be two stock bolt holes drilled in them, one above the other. The top hole is where the bolt is located and I don't know what purpose of the lower one is. Weight reduction, perhaps? Together, they result in a large oval opening and all I had to do was make the lower hole an inch deeper and cut an extension from the device that I assume helps position it in the gun for which it is intended. I secured it in the stock with a pan-head wood screw with a flat washer under its head into the floor of the stock and bearing against the end of the device.

I've always thought that Dead Mules were the most effective recoil reduction device out there. I have one mounted on the magazine cap of my 870 and obviously can remove it quickly for comparison testing. Even weighted magazine caps that weigh a lot more don't dampen recoil as much as the Dead Mule. For me, anyway, they work better than weight alone or mercury reducers. In fact, I tried a 16-ounce (yes, one pound!) mercury reducer in my gun at one time and felt very little improvement. This Beretta gadget really works.

The left-handed Beretta shooter who shot my gun wants one for his 682 in the worst way but Beretta does not sell them yet. I'd imagine that as soon as the gun for which it is intended is released, the device will be available as a replacement part.

Ed
 
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