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The 12 ga was a terrible design that kicked the living snot out of you. I hate something with an automatic safety, not sure if the small ga versions had them as well. If I want my safety on I’ll put it on. I think the R & D team for Ruger must have been two hunting guys covered in hunter orange from hat to shoes on the design of it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The 12 ga was a terrible design that kicked the living snot out of you. I hate something with an automatic safety, not sure if the small ga versions had them as well. If I want my safety on I’ll put it on. I think the R & D team for Ruger must have been two hunting guys covered in hunter orange from hat to shoes on the design of it.
change the pad
 

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The 12 ga was a terrible design that kicked the living snot out of you. I hate something with an automatic safety, not sure if the small ga versions had them as well. If I want my safety on I’ll put it on. I think the R & D team for Ruger must have been two hunting guys covered in hunter orange from hat to shoes on the design of it.
Sir, like you I HATE automatic safeties. I understand the product safety and liability concerns in todays litigious society but still.....I found out a no cost conversion for the Red Label and did it on both my 12 and 20 gauge versions, especially the Sporting Clays version 12 gauge. Take the stock off and the safety is easily visible and accessible. It is spring loaded to hold it in place. I simply used a screw driver to depress the spring and swing the safety out free of its position and used a dremel tool to cut off the little stud in the back of the safety that contacted the mechanism and automatically pushed the safety on. It became a manual safety in doing that. Now then, the disclaimer is that I did it on my gun and would NEVER do it on another persons gun. And my action is not a recommendation for anyone else. What you do in the privacy of your workshop is your decision alone. But it works!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Change the pad?

I challenge you to take it out to shoot a pheasant with some federal hi-bird 3 3/4 dram 1 1/4 7.5 pigeon loads..........I’ll buy the remaining 23 shells from you after this experience.
u dont need them heavy loads an a real good pad helps alot when hunting an clay shooting mines 35 yrs old an shoot 200 clays at low gun with no pain
 

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The 12 ga was a terrible design that kicked the living snot out of you. I hate something with an automatic safety, not sure if the small ga versions had them as well. If I want my safety on I’ll put it on. I think the R & D team for Ruger must have been two hunting guys covered in hunter orange from hat to shoes on the design of it.
The Red Label kicks no harder than any other gun. Physics are physics. It’s all in gun fit and mine fits me well. Look closely at my avatar and you will see my Red Label on my shoulder. It is MY sporting clays gun and unless I find something I shoot better it will continue to be. I did replace the factory pad with a thicker Kickeez which also helped with the lop, which I needed.
 

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I used a Red label sporting clays edition as a doubles gun for a couple years. It did not kick any different than any other field gun of the same weight. It shot really flat. I thought it was a good gun.

I took the auto safety link out of the Red label, a Beretta and a couple other field guns. I think you have to buy a competition model gun to avoid an automatic safety anymore.
 

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The 12 ga was a terrible design that kicked the living snot out of you. I hate something with an automatic safety, not sure if the small ga versions had them as well. If I want my safety on I’ll put it on. I think the R & D team for Ruger must have been two hunting guys covered in hunter orange from hat to shoes on the design of it.
My 12 guage fits me perfectly, that's why I bought it. I have no problem with recoil from it. My wife shoots it for an occasion doubles, I just have to build up the comb for her.
Just because they make it , doesn't mean they made it For You !
 

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I definitely like the 30” barrels on the sporting version over the 26” or 28” which are more common. Also the under barrel on the sporting version is slightly canted up which gives it a slightly higher poi as opposed to the field guns which have parallel barrels.

Wish Ruger would have kept making them. Don’t know what happened with the remake they started but it went away fast.
 

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Sorry. I think I have hijacked this thread but I think the Red Label got a bad rap somewhere along the line. I really like my gun.
There are some who say they cannot be repaired when they wear out but I haven’t worn mine out yet.:balltrap:
 

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I have the 20ga in 28” and love it. It was the first O/U I had ever bought and learned to shoot it well mainly for dove. My Dad bought the 12 ga and it does not fit me well so the perceived recoil is greater, at least for me. Can’t beat the value for the money in 20ga though. I agree that the auto safety is a pain, especially when used to a target gun.
 

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Ruger Red Label o/u, field and, particularly, the Sporting Clay models were given very good comments among well-regarded shotguns by Michael McIntosh, a recognized shotgun authority, in his book "The Gun Review Book". Having owned and enjoyed Red Labels over the years, my experience with them has been excellent! Regards, Ed

More: In his chapter on Best Buys, McIntosh states the 12 ga. Red Label is too heavy for upland hunting, but is a "dandy" wildfowler. The 20 ga. is a likeable uplander and the 28 ga. is the only factory o/u available on a true 28 ga. frame under $3,000.
 

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Ruger Red Label o/u, field and, particularly, the Sporting Clay models were given very good comments among well-regarded shotguns by Michael McIntosh, a recognized shotgun authority, in his book "The Gun Review Book". Having owned and enjoyed Red Labels over the years, my experience with them has been excellent! Regards, Ed

More: In his chapter on Best Buys, McIntosh states the 12 ga. Red Label is too heavy for upland hunting, but is a "dandy" wildfowler. The 20 ga. is a likeable uplander and the 28 ga. is the only factory o/u available on a true 28 ga. frame under $3,000.
I would agree with being too heavy for upland hunting. I used it for pheasant one year, got my birds but my right arm was tired by the end of the day. It’s the 30” sporting model so that’s all I use it for now. It’s my favorite for that! It gets a lot of shells run through it as a result.
 
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