Trapshooters Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
187 Posts
Stovepiping is what happens when your brass doesn't eject fully. It "stovepipes", or flips up and is caught by the bolt when it closes. Have no idea on what is causing your problem.

Maybe Trench12 will appear and enlighten us. HarryC.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Stovepiping is a more common term in the pistol world. Where the ejecting case fails to get out of the way when the action is closing (usually on an auto pisto). My Beretta will do it nearly everytime when limp-wristing a light load.

Packing.org describes it pretty well. I've never seen a .22 auto do it, though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,981 Posts
Have you tried any better quality ammo? If seen plenty of 22's do this, and most times it's either weak 22 ammo, of a very dirty gun.

The cheap ammo doesn't seem to have enough power to move the bolt fast enough backwards to allow the ejector to give the empty a good "kick".

One other possiblity could be a weak extractor spring. When the ejector hits the empty, the rim of the shell will slip from the extractors grasp, losing it's pivot point.

Doug
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
366 Posts
This thing was made in both tube feed and clip fed models. Wudya got? Most I have been around will function without fail. Under no circumstances would I attempt to disassemble as they nightmares. As with most rimfires the biggest problem is wa, bullet lub, and unburned powder mixed with overlubrication which forms a nasty gunk and slows things way down. Don't know what you are feeding this thing but try the more expensive copper washed ammo instead of waxed lead projectile type. Hope this helps!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
Try asking at rimfirecentral.com (link above). There's a section specifically for Remington. From what I've read there, the Nylon 66 is considered to be one of the most reliable .22s ever made, so your problem shouldn't be considered typical. I didn't realize these were available with a magazine, I thought only tube feed. Good luck with it. James Fawcett
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,892 Posts
James,

I bought one for my daughter with a clip magazine but it is called an Apache 77. Virtually the same gun except the plastic is green camo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
163 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
timb99 the Apache 77 you bought for your daughter should have a 10 round clip. That model was an exclusive run, marketed by K Mart 1987-1989. There was a Mohawk brown 77 made with a 5 round clip made from 1970-1971. That gun was replaced in 1972 with the model 10C same gun but with a 10 round clip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
Find a diagram, take it apart, clean it thoroughly, oil the bearing surfaces, then use regular 40gr hi-speed ammo in it.

I've done that with a couple of them, and it worked both times.

They are kind of a pain to take apart and reassemble...........

One more thing....... When you have it apart, check the chamber mouth for dings due to dry firing.

Good luck.

Ric C.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,135 Posts
Not to be crude. I remember when I bought my first compensated pistol. It was brand new and was "stovepiping" every fifth round. I was getting mad and the range officer told me I was "limpwristing" and to stiffen my wrist. Later I had to explain to him that "limpwristing" had a whole different meaning in my neighborhood! LOL I finally put in a non compensated barrel to shoot the bottoms out of the 33 round mags. Still works fine today.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,892 Posts
whiz bang,

Thanks for that info. I bought it used, but it still had the original box.

Fun little plinker.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
163 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Fugate firearms in KY has a NIB 66 just like the one on Gunbroker with the scope listed for $900.00 also. Last week at the Tulsa Gun Show I talked to a dealer there that had four model 66 NIB that were still factory sealed with out the scope. He was firm at $1000.00 per gun. In my opinion these guys are fishing.

One table down i bought a model 77 Apache "the K mart gun" NIB for $400.00. Thats a much rarer gun. Go figure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,424 Posts
On a nylon 66 the ejector is a little metal piece that slides in from the back of the receiver. It may be missing. It usually falls out when you take the metal receiver off. To remove the receiver you take out the two bolts that hold it on and pull out the plastic bolt handle. The receiver slides upward and off. On the back side (opposide side of the bolt) there is a little slit that the ejector (flat piece of metal about 1.5 inches long that has a bend in it) slides into.

If you go to www.e-gunparts.com (numrich arms) you can look at a schematic of a nylon 66. It is number 19 on the schematic and it slides in from the back side.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,892 Posts
I had no idea that Apache 77 could be worth that much.

I bought it about 7 or 8 years ago, not new, but in almost new condition and in the original box (which I still have) for about $100.00

Cool!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
I don't recall the Nylon 66 coming in a clip fed version. I have seen ones that were magazine fed but never a clip fed one. Would like to see one if there is.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,892 Posts
Here's one.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,892 Posts
>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
163 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Model 66s have a 14 round tubular fed magazine through the but plate. The only semi autos I am aware of that are clip fed would be the model 77 with a 5 round clip or "box magazine". Model 10C with a 10 round clip, and the model 77 Apache with a 10 round magazine. The rifle pictured above by timb99 is a model 77 Apache with a 10 round clip. This gun is the gun that was marketed by K mart produced from 1987-1989.
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top