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I have a Remington 11-87 that I just started using for Trap shooting it's barrel heavy where on the gun should be t's balance point?
 

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Some like a barrel heavy gun for Trap.

You can always add weight to the stock to move the balance back.

Its All Good

West
 

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Shotgun balance is ENTIRELY subjective to each shooter.
OP asked the shotgun's point of balance. It is different for every shotgun, but is not subjective. How the shotgun feels, which can include 'balance' is, as you say, individual and subjective.
 

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OP asked the shotgun's point of balance. It is different for every shotgun, but is not subjective. How the shotgun feels, which can include 'balance' is, as you say, individual and subjective.
No, he asked:
where on the gun should be t's balance point?
There is no "should be", it is up to the shooter to find what works best for them.
 

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A gun with neutral handling will balance about 4.5" in front of the trigger. I would imagine a garden variety 11-87 will be 6" or so in front, and that is definitely enough to make it feel front heavy. My experience with Remington barrels is that they are all over the place; some can feel like a large cantaloupe is stuck on the end of the barrel.
 

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Go Chiefs and now ready for the Super Bowl ! ..... Nb. 15 the Great Magic Mcholmes.
Yes, well, I'm pretty sure the guys under those Green Bay helmets are really the Minnesota Vikings......:vikings27:
 

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Different stock, denser wood, adjustable recoil pad hardware, adjustable comb hardware, heavier contour barrel, longer barrel, shorter barrel, heavier action sleeve (like in the Magnum models), having a cartridge in the chamber, having another, or several, cartridges in the tube magazine, all these things will affect the center of mass (a.k.a. balance point.)

But generally, it'll be in the general vicinity of where Norman's photo shows it.

Skeet Man is 100% correct. Whether that balance point is the "right" balance point is up to the shooter's personal preference.
 
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I totally agree w all that was said above. It also appears that picture is of the sporting clays model that has a shorter mag tube and forend. If it’s a field or trap model the balance point would be a shade closer to the barrel but the picture illustrates the general area of the balance point. But w all that said, how it “feels” is very subjective to the individual shooter.
 

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"A gun with neutral handling will balance about 4.5" in front of the trigger. " Wrong. A neutral balance point is about a 1/4" in front of the trigger guard. At least it was for over a hundred years, and still is as far as I know. Back in the " Golden Age of Gun Making " it's what every gun maker went for. Don't know why it would have changed. Now where one likes the gun to balance is another thing. Some like them muzzle heavy for a smoother swing that helps follow through and others like bird hunters like the muzzles to be more lively and easier to move quickly. As said it's a personal thing. That's why items are offered to change the balance point.
 

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The other thing to keep in mind is that if you're trying to compare multiple guns, and using a frame of reference (trigger, trigger guard, hinge pin, ect) these may all be in dramatically different locations on different model guns. A K80 has a much longer receiver than most o/us, so a gun balanced on the hinge will be more muzzle heavy than a Browning.
 
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