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Hello I bought a rem compition barrel for my 1100 it's back bored with the long chokes, I've shot 400 shells through it and went and took the barrel off to clean the gun. Oh my it was bad!! plastic and more plastic in the throat area of the barrel anyway lots of brush time. I can see the tool marks inside the barrel could I use a brake hone with super fine stone and hone on it myself and be safe? Thanks David
 

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If you want to do this yourself, go to Brownell's website and look at the barrel hones. They sell coarse and fine barrel hones, med forcing cone hones, and fine chamber hones.

Make sure you buy the oil made for these hones. They work very well. Use Brake Cleaner and compressed air to remove residue. This is the right way to do it. The hones will do several barrels, if handled and used properly.

Steel wool will not remove toolmarks, but will only make them smoother. If a brake hone stone breaks, it will quickly score your barrel and make things worse.
 

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Nooooooooooooooooooo! I dont think so

There was a warning out to not do any barrel work on those particular ones-

I would do as suggested above- try different wads

regards from Iowa

Gene
 

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It depends on the depth of the tool marks. I do not think the stones on a break hone would do a nice job. The one I have is way too course. I would be thinking about sending it to Tom Wilkinson.

Pat Ireland
 

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I have seen more barrels ruined with a break hone then with a hacksaw. This is not the place to save money. Jeff
 

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These hones may take out.001", but only if you wear a coarse and a fine out on one barrel. That will take a lot of time and effort.

Five minutes with the coarse, and three with the fine, and you will notice the difference. Five seconds from breech to muzzle, five seconds back. Use plenty of oil.

This is not a suggestion, but an answer to a question that will not damage but will solve the poster's dilemma.

I wore out a hone set on one of my Perazzi barrel sets, and changed bore dimensions .001". I spent a long time on that barrel. Now it will hurt your eyes to look through it, and the gun is a snap to clean, which was what I wanted.

I am lazy in my old age. LOL
 

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I agree with both Mr. Ireland and Shooting coach. Contacting a barrel expert is never a bad idea and using those barrel hones will not hurt anything. To the concept of using honing stones, I would not use a competition barrel as my first try.
 

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David, just curious. You say it's backbored and I wonder if it is one of the Remington-supplied over-bore barrels or if, instead, someone has "worked on it."

The Flex-hone ® pictured, with the appropriate cutting oil, can make a bore so perfect-looking you just can't believe it. Brownell's is my source. They also have chamber hones which will make the the weakest ejector springs rid gun of an economy shell, thus paying for itself in the long run.

However - if you compare the worst possible bore with the best, you won't see anything on your chronograph. Patterns perhaps, but you can take a $75 Korean hammergun with a barrel that looks knurled, polish it til it looks like a Stan Baker special, and the chronograph says you've been wasting your time.

Neil
 

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Dear Neil

You are right. Some of the tightest shooting barrels for card shooting I have ever seen looked like they WERE knurled! I knew a fellow who would run an overbore reamer through an old Marlin bolt action "Goose Gun" with a 36" barrel, and not do anything else. Those barrels would get you beat up at a turkey shoot!

However, I prefer a mirror bore in a tournament gun. If I shoot a flat or more of shells through a barrel in a day, I do not want to spend "days" cleaning it.

I am also of the belief that the less a barrel fouls over the day's shooting, the more consistently it patterns.

I DO like to hone chambers. It makes the stubborn hulls flow through chambers like quicksilver. Most clubs in my area sell promo and import shells. Proper functioning with such shells is important.

If a gun that comes to me does not have chrome, it gets a taste of the hone. American Brownings have chambers only chromed, so a rough bore can be fixed.
 

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Uh, why? Today's solvents seem to get things clean rather quickly when attacking mere plastic. Not the case with a 220 Swift barrel, for example, getting the copper off and out, but a shotgun? Brushes are cheap and so is Shooters' Choice. (Relatively)..
 

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Mike, all your talk about Wadlock II barrels has so far cost me $213.95 - ordering one - and then there will be the paper and time and all that. Luckily, it's just the sort of thing I _love_ to do.

Neil
 
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